PipeChat Digest #4418 - Wednesday, April 7, 2004
 
Re: The Lewis organ in Southwark Cathedral
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Re: Easter postludes
  by "cnash cnash" <cnash@mail.fbcaiken.org>
Re: Easter postludes
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Sweet gawfulthique
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Easter postludes
  by "Patricia/Thomas Gregory" <tgregory@speeddial.net>
Flag near altar
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
Re: Willis and Lewis in London
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Easter postludes
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
NPM Regional Convention in Chicago
  by <pthibaul@maine.rr.com>
One of our organs is missing.....
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Easter postludes
  by "cnash cnash" <cnash@mail.fbcaiken.org>
Re: Vibrato and Pastoral Care
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Easter postludes
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Vibrato and Pastoral Care
  by <pthibaul@maine.rr.com>
Re: NPM Regional Convention in Chicago
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
RE: Venezuela National Anthem
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
Re: Vibrato and Pastoral Care
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Re: NPM Regional Convention in Chicago
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: NPM Regional Convention in Chicago
  by <pthibaul@maine.rr.com>
Re: Flag near alter
  by "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk>
Re: Venezuela National Anthem
  by "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk>
The Organists Dilemma --  Was RE: Easter Postludes
  by "Larry Wheelock" <llwheels@mac.com>
Re:altering the alter
  by "Larry Wheelock" <llwheels@mac.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: The Lewis organ in Southwark Cathedral From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Wed, 07 Apr 2004 06:34:02 -0400   At 11:06 PM 4/6/2004, John Speller wrote: >You seem to miss the point here. Train noises were invented to enhance >great musical performances. Where would St. Thomas, Fifth Avenue, New = York >be without the subway trains?   Somewhere other than on Fifth Avenue, I suppose! Which was there first, St. Thomas's or the subway?   I was at a Peter Hurford recital there once, and he was quite lucky, in that he seemed to have timed his recital so that the trains went = underneath between the music. Maybe he had some "pull" with the train drivers!   Cheers,   Bob Conway    
(back) Subject: Re: Easter postludes From: "cnash cnash" <cnash@mail.fbcaiken.org> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 07:08:48 -0400   That is probably the reason why most of us DON'T play the Suite = Gothique....it is quite an elementary piece...which is pretty much broken = chords...tonic to dominant....I have not played Suite Gothique since my = high school junior recital.   Christopher               ---------- Original Message ---------------------------------- From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Tue, 6 Apr 2004 19:25:34 -0700 (PDT)   >Am I the ONLY person here who likes to play the Suite Gothique? >LOL >Come on now...every one wants to do everything but Boellmann's = Toccata..all that drama, tension and then that discombobulated modulation = from dominant back to Tonic..then that triumphant picardy 3rd ending after = all the trial and tribulation? > >(Giggle) > > > >>From Desiree' >T. Desiree' Hines >Chicago, IL 60610 >---------------------------- >For Compositions by Desiree' >Frog Music Press >www.frogmusic.com >------------------------------- >FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' >http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html > >--------------------------------- >Do you Yahoo!? >Yahoo! Small Business $15K Web Design Giveaway - Enter today >  
(back) Subject: Re: Easter postludes From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 07:55:18 EDT   In a message dated 4/7/2004 7:07:19 AM Eastern Standard Time, cnash@mail.fbcaiken.org writes:   > most of us DON'T play the Suite Gothique   some of us old farts still play it because the people like to hear = it....and it makes a mean wedding recessional ---sounds like a dire warning of = impending turmoil and death to the poor fool getting married.   the Prayer is still lovely and plays on any size organ even "Baldwin" toasters.   dale in Florida    
(back) Subject: Sweet gawfulthique From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Wed, 07 Apr 2004 07:05:45 -0500   Does that mean I need to dust if off for this gig? I thought it was much better off in moth balls.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Keys4bach@aol.com   the Prayer is still lovely and plays on any size organ even "Baldwin" toasters.          
(back) Subject: Easter postludes From: "Patricia/Thomas Gregory" <tgregory@speeddial.net> Date: Wed, 07 Apr 2004 07:17:25 -0500   Greetings:   After a long prelude/w/brass ensemble + several hymns + several anthems I always looked forward to getting off the bench (probably as much as the congregation looked forward to making a quick exit).   My standard postlude was the Farnam toccata on "Ye Sons & Daughters"....short/fast/and impressive (especially on a Skinner/w/good reeds).   Now that I am in "semi-retirement" I fondly look back on Holy Week & = Easter Sunday with fond memories. Maybe we will get the eggs dyed this year.   Best wishes,   Tom Gregory         -- Thomas and Patricia Gregory 716 West College Avenue Waukesha WI USA 53186-4569  
(back) Subject: Flag near altar From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Wed, 07 Apr 2004 07:28:07 -0500   I'm a bit behind in my reading, but I noted the following. . .   Craig <Swedish5702@aol.com> wrote:   > I am quite sure IF we had been defeated in WW II we wouldn't have any = freedom of > anything as we would either all be slaves or dead.   > Something to think about when you comment on OUR flag.   In our church, we DO think about it. Every week. Our former Pastor, who is a VERY Patriotic sort, has us stand and start the service with the Pledge of Allegiance to both the U.S. and the Christian flag (yes, there = IS a pledge for that flag also!) and sing "God Bless America" before starting our Worship Services.   He started this when our troops went to Iraq and our current Pastor (his son!) plans to continue it each and every Sunday until EVERYONE is back home again! I say: GOOD FOR THEM!!! Perhaps the conflict would be over sooner if more churches followed this practice and PRAYED for our troops for both success and protection while overseas.   I'm grateful for every hard-fought-for (and WON) freedoms, including the ability to be able to do this and think EVERY ONE of us who live in this great country need to take a moment and ponder this fact and give thanks accordingly and appropriately!   Faithfully,   G.A.   -- Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO <>< Schneider Pipe Organs, Inc. 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (877) 944-2454 TOLL-FREE (217) 944-2527 FAX arpschneider@starband.net Home Office EMAIL arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com URL ADDRESS  
(back) Subject: Re: Willis and Lewis in London From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 05:28:03 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Oh dear!   I don't know where John gets the idea that I believe Willis gained his reputation by re-building Lewis organs! (Willis more or less exterminated Lewis, and put their name to his last works.)   I also don't know where he gets the idea that Harrison & Harrison became famous out of re-building Willis organs! (That said, the re-build of the Willis at Durham was their first big job.)   Willis was precocious in the extreme, very talented and very self confident. After all, he was very young when he established the Willis sound, and somewhere near Liverpool is a very early Fr Willis which sounds like no other I have ever heard. To be honest, the overall effect is not good in spite of some nice individual ranks.   At Crosby PC, Liverpool, is a wonderful example of a three manual Fr Willis in full bloom; just a few years later, and very similar to the magnificent Fr Willis I used to play at St Augustine's, Kilburn, London.   I think Willis worked to a very successful, but very predictable formula, with an almost "factory" approach to scaling etc.   I must have been blessed, for in addition to being associated with Fr Willis and Kilburn, my first ever post was as organist of Holy Trinity, Keighley (my home town), which housed an early Harrison & Harrison from around 1880.   This was one of the three organs which Lt Col George Dixon visited in the Yorkshire area, and around the time that he suggested a different tonal scheme of things to Harrison's. St Bees priory was, I believe, the first to be built to Lt Col George Dixon's design, replete with the typical fiery Swell reeds and bright mixture, the big Cornet with Septieme rank on the Great, and the usual Trombas on HP etc.   In fact, the Holy Trinity organ was fascinating, for it was originally built as a two-manual instrument and then enlarged. Modest wind throughout, the original organ had a very restrained Swell, a very nice Great (with a superb tracker action), a five stop Pedal with a large wooden bass and a simply ghastly, utility case.   When the third manual was added (on the same modest pressure), it was placed ABOVE the Swell manual, and had a very odd tonal design with, if I recall correctly, the following:-   Clarabella 8 Viole da Gamba 8 Flute (?) 4 Picollo 2   (The above un-enclosed)   Clarinet 8 Orchestral Oboe 8 Vox Humana 8   (these three enclosed in a swell box on the same chest)   The reeds were awful, the flutes fat and unblending and the only use I could ever find for them, was as an extension of the pedal organ!   If ever an organ summed up the difference between things tonally in 1875 and 1905, this was it, and to be honest, the original older pipework was far superior in tonal blend.   Of course, with acres of mahogany, straight grained pine, massive timbers and an extremely robust action, it was, in all other respects, a Harrison to the last key ivory.   Also, just up the road, from around 1911, is the very first EP actioned Harrison & Harrison at Christ Church, Skipton, which continues to give magnificent service. A two manual organ with a prepared third, this organ is every bit the Edwardian Harrison sound, with leathered diapasons, HP tromba and a big pedal Ophicleide.....a tiny cathedral organ sound, in fact.   So with all due respect to what John Foss says (and I know exactly what he means), I think that H & H did not need Willis organs to become famous. In terms of quality workmanship, they were vastly superior to Willis, and with the tonal ideas of Lt Col George Dixon......as they say....right on!   Finally, it seems a funny thing that, probably the very best re-build that Harrison & Harrison did (rather than restoration projects like Southwark and Armley) was to the rather non-descript instrument at St George's Chapel, Windsor, originally by Spurden-Rutt among others.   They created a simply wonderful sounding instrument which is as fascinating and thrilling to-day, as it was in the 1960's when they re-built it. It gets my vote anyway!   Now, about Willis's private life.   So far as I know, he only married his first wife's sister, which was then illegal.   His business life was much more interesting, for he would find more than one patron to pay half each for the organ, and then charge the church for an additional half!   In the words of Henry Willis IV, "This made certain organ-building rather profitable."   Fr Willis may have been a criminal and a con-man, but he could certainly build organs!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK             --- John Foss <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> wrote: > Colin > is the expert on Fr Willis' private life - I don't > believe a word of it, Colin! - and whereas I > maintain > that Harrison and Harrison first built there > reputation on rebuilding Willis organs, I think > Colin > believes Willis built his on re-building Lewis > organs!     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! 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(back) Subject: Re: Easter postludes From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 05:32:35 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   But .....(note the but word) ....could YOU write anything half as effective?   There's nothing wrong in tonic and dominant. Why should the cinema organists have all the fun?   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- cnash cnash <cnash@mail.fbcaiken.org> wrote: > That is probably the reason why most of us DON'T > play the Suite Gothique....it is quite an elementary > piece...which is pretty much broken chords...tonic > to dominant....I have not played Suite Gothique > since my high school junior recital.     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Small Business $15K Web Design Giveaway http://promotions.yahoo.com/design_giveaway/  
(back) Subject: NPM Regional Convention in Chicago From: <pthibaul@maine.rr.com> Date: Wed, 07 Apr 2004 08:45:55 -0400   My question: Anyone planning to attend the Central Regional National = Association of Pastoral Musicians in Chicago on June 28th to July 1st?   I confess that I have never been to any NPM function, perhaps because = their brochures seem to be so directed to the piano playuh who is called = to play an occassional mass. I have been to AGO regionals, but the = brochures are SO different in direction.   Whether intentional or not, reading a convention program which is heavy on = "From Piano to Organ: Organ for Pianists" and "Choral Directing I" really = discourages the attendance of anyone who knows his or her way around a = basic pipe organ console. (An editoral isn't necessary here--you all know = what I am a-thinkin')   But, I intend to attend. I am sure there will be various groups of = underground secret societies of people who play standard literature (and I = do NOT mean Glory and Praise). The brochure, I understand, was crafted to = invite the begining keyboard player--but I HAVE to believe that there will = be some good discussions -- it would be great fun to meet you subversive = yet competant Roman Catholic employees!   Phil Thibault MANE (Upper left hand corner of the map)    
(back) Subject: One of our organs is missing..... From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 06:05:56 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   And.....note the 'and' word.....I know just how John feels.   I have a simply dreadful book about the Rotterdam bombing during WW2, with many, many pictures. The destruction was almost total, and very, very little of old Rotterdam remained afterwards; the pictures showing an almost desolate landscape with, as John suggests, the defiant burned-out shell of the cathedral still standing.   People in Rotterdam have never forgotten that destruction, and it is etched on the civic memory.   Of course, the superb restoration of the building has resulted in something of an organ mecca, with FOUR organs in the building. There is the organ in the Choir, the Chancel Organ, the huge Marcussen in the West Gallery, and a tiny little pipe-organ in a side chapel.   Of course, the destruction of WW2 also affected other countries, including Poland, Germany, Belgium, France (to a limited extent) and Russia (not many organs there) among others. Even the UK lost a number of historic buildings.   Which leads to two further questions......   Firstly, perhaps John could tell us what historic organs were lost in Rotterdam generally, and in Holland in particular; bearing in mind that places like Eindhoven were also badly damaged. I know absolutely nothing about the loss of organs in Holland during this dreadful chapter in European history, and do not recall ever knowing what organ was in Rotterdam cathedral before the bombing.   Secondly, has anyone ever catalogued the loss of important instruments in Poland, Czechoslovakia, Germany, Belgium and elsewhere?   Indeed, moving up to date, what was lost during the Yugoslavian conflicts?   I recall seeing a lovely twin harp case in the West Gallery of Lublijana Cathedral in the former Yugoslavia, and I know that Belgrade suffered terrible loss of historic and priceless buildings/art.   The very thought of people destroying priceless medieval Istrian frescoes is a quite distressing one, but I bet they did!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       --- John Vanderlee <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> wrote: > I was born in Rotterdam at the end of WW2. > I 'll never forget > that area where a > brick was the tallest thing remaining. Except.... > the skeleton of the > St Laurens church and it's steeple all blackened by > the fire that > destroyed it   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Small Business $15K Web Design Giveaway http://promotions.yahoo.com/design_giveaway/  
(back) Subject: Re: Easter postludes From: "cnash cnash" <cnash@mail.fbcaiken.org> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 09:09:29 -0400   - I don't know, could I? Concordia thinks so....   Christopher         --------- Original Message ---------------------------------- From: Colin Mitchell <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 05:32:35 -0700 (PDT)   >Hello, > >But .....(note the but word) ....could YOU write >anything half as effective? > >There's nothing wrong in tonic and dominant. Why >should the cinema organists have all the fun? > >Regards, > >Colin Mitchell UK > >--- cnash cnash <cnash@mail.fbcaiken.org> wrote: >> That is probably the reason why most of us DON'T >> play the Suite Gothique....it is quite an elementary >> piece...which is pretty much broken chords...tonic >> to dominant....I have not played Suite Gothique >> since my high school junior recital. > > >__________________________________ >Do you Yahoo!? >Yahoo! Small Business $15K Web Design Giveaway >http://promotions.yahoo.com/design_giveaway/ >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >          
(back) Subject: Re: Vibrato and Pastoral Care From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 06:19:48 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   I know about pastoral care......   I knew THE most insensitive Organist/Choirmaster in history, who once suggested that two of the sopranos in the choir were ready for the glue factory!!!!!   They couldn't stick it any longer, and left....probably suicidal.   Then there was an elderly gentleman who, in his eighties, had a fine bass voice. Unfortunately, he was on quite powerful medication, and never did heed the doctor's advice that he should not drink whilst taking pills.   Imagine the scene of the Nativity......9 lessons and carols.....the choir take their place at the West End of a large gothic church, and old Eric stands there with "Once in Royal" at the ready.   Whether it was the pills or the hip flask of whisky, we could not be sure, but just as the boy soloist was about to sing, old Eric suddenly took leave of his senses and shouted, at the top of his voice "This is a right grand affair....Merry Christmas everybody!!"   The 9 lessons started a little later, after Eric was de-frocked and bundled into a guarded pew!!   A wonderful moment, still talked about long after Eric's demise.....bless his memory.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Small Business $15K Web Design Giveaway http://promotions.yahoo.com/design_giveaway/  
(back) Subject: Re: Easter postludes From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 07 Apr 2004 09:29:06 -0400   On 4/6/04 8:24 PM, "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> wrote:   > on 4/6/04 7:45 PM, Glenda at gksjd85@direcway.com wrote: > >> I hope that's not what I'm playing! >> >> Glenda Sutton > > Glenda dear, are you playing somewhere, then? > There WAS that funeral solo, very popular (but much cursed) in the 1920s, "Beautiful Isle of Somewhere." Truth (alleged) is stranger than fiction.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Vibrato and Pastoral Care From: <pthibaul@maine.rr.com> Date: Wed, 07 Apr 2004 09:33:14 -0400   " two of the sopranos in the choir were ready for the glue factory!!!!! = >>>They couldn't stick it out any longer, ....."   Isn't cut and paste FUN?    
(back) Subject: Re: NPM Regional Convention in Chicago From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 07 Apr 2004 09:45:04 -0400   On 4/7/04 8:45 AM, "pthibaul@maine.rr.com" <pthibaul@maine.rr.com> wrote:   > MANE (Upper left hand corner of the map)   Politically or geographically?   Phil: I hope you go. And I look forward to your report. I OFTEN find myself urging RC people to connect with NPM, but don't know whether I'm going them a favor or not. I HOPE I am!   Alan    
(back) Subject: RE: Venezuela National Anthem From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 10:00:38 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@elcel.net.ve   Yes, it is! I believed for years that the history with the lullaby was an irrespectful joke or legend- until someone lended me a record with the ol= d tune. The lullaby's melody was adapted for the refrain.   Yours Andres =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.   ----- Original Message ----- From: Randolph Runyon <runyonr@muohio.edu> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, April 06, 2004 11:10 AM Subject: Re: Venezuela National Anthem     Andr=E9s, is this it? http://www.imagesoft.net/midi/venezuel.mid Doesn't sound like it could ever have been a lullaby, but it is a fine tu= ne all the same.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu    
(back) Subject: Re: Vibrato and Pastoral Care From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 21:53:34 +0800   Well, I repeat, I have no argument wth that, but Bud suggested that = church musicians should take a course in pastoral care at a seminary. = The type of training at a seminary would probably not include the kind = of pastoral care mentioned in the posts supporting Bud's argument. I = said the last thing I would want would be such a course. I stick by = that. Now perhaps we can get back on topic?   BTW I noticed mention of the Lewis organ in Southwark. I read somewhere = that this is a sister organ to that in St Paul's Cathedral, Melbourne, = recently restored. Bob Elms. ----- Original Message -----=20 From: DERREINETOR@aol.com=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Wednesday, April 07, 2004 2:15 AM Subject: Re: Vibrato and Pastoral Care     On the subject of pastoral care by church musicians, I am in 100% = agreement with Bud. Bud's examples of pastoral situations which arise in = choirs really resonate with me, especially those surrounding allowing = those who miss rehearsal to sing on Sunday.=20    
(back) Subject: Re: NPM Regional Convention in Chicago From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 10:31:05 EDT   In a message dated 4/7/2004 9:45:48 AM Eastern Daylight Time, acfreed0904@earthlink.net writes: I HOPE I am! Your are. Some AGO snootiness but mostly much nicer people.   dale in Florida    
(back) Subject: Re: NPM Regional Convention in Chicago From: <pthibaul@maine.rr.com> Date: Wed, 07 Apr 2004 11:27:01 -0400   I OFTEN > findmyself urging RC people to connect with NPM, but don't know > whether I'm > going them a favor or not. I HOPE I am!   I'm a-going--just hope I'm not a goner! > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Flag near alter From: "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 16:38:21 +0100   Well, Bob: it's the schoolteacher in ME (even though I taught children, = not schools) that makes me use the RED pencil in such cases. Red / Blue ? "Red ? Blue ? What's in a colour ?" as the General said to his Staff Officers ! (Get it ?)   Harry {MusicMan] Grove   ('Two Nations, divided by a common language')   PS, Just to keep things 'on topic', I use black felt-tip then composing at the keyboard ....damn things don't 'run-out' just because they're writing 'up-hill'.   PPS, Also, just to keep things '0n-thread', we'll be having all sorts of flags next to our Alter(nate) / Altar this Easter Sunday, from the Saint's banner (St. Leonard) to Mothers' Union, and the Scouts and Brownies. Just about the only flag we WON'T be having is the Country's flag (the Union flag, not the Jack, 'cos we're not a- float).         -----Original Message----- From: bobelms <bobelms@westnet.com.au> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: 07 April 2004 06:32 Subject: Re: Flag near alter     >That title worries me. Shouldn't we alter the word "alter" to "altar"?? It's >the retired schoolmaster in me that makes me blue pencil spelling errors! >Can't get away from it! >Bob Elms.      
(back) Subject: Re: Venezuela National Anthem From: "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 16:52:39 +0100   Pssst, Andres; thanks for the help pointing me in (what I hope) is the = right direction   -----Original Message----- From: Andr=E9s G=FCnther <agun@telcel.net.ve> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: 07 April 2004 14:52 Subject: RE: Venezuela National Anthem     Andres Gunther agun@elcel.net.ve      
(back) Subject: The Organists Dilemma -- Was RE: Easter Postludes From: "Larry Wheelock" <llwheels@mac.com> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 11:05:54 -0500       On Apr 7, 2004, at 5:01 AM,Glenda Sutton wrote:   > Even people with horrible instruments need to worship, and an attempt > at > music on them is better than none at all, I guess (although I'm not > convinced in this case).   Herein lies the dilemma with which I have struggled many times over. Should you do your best to hide the flaws of the instrument and risk the listeners saying "Gee -- is sounds so good when he/she plays it; why would we need a new organ?" Or, do you let the flaws shine through - usually just a matter of trying to play the instrument as if it were a good one and using standard registration, techniques and a practiced 'startled' look when it misbehaves.   I've been there many times with both pipe and non-pipe instruments. Which do you do???     Larry Wheelock Director of Music Ministries Kenwood United Methodist Church Milwaukee, Wisconsin musicdirector@kenwood-umc.org  
(back) Subject: Re:altering the alter From: "Larry Wheelock" <llwheels@mac.com> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 11:10:42 -0500     On Apr 7, 2004, at 5:01 AM, Bob Elms wrote:   > Shouldn't we alter the word "alter" to "altar"??   Thank you Bob! I was turning four shades of blue here at my computer as I read the postings fully-competent people mis-choosing the word 'alter' for 'altar;' a common mistake among the laiety, but embarrassing for church professions, IMHO.