PipeChat Digest #4419 - Wednesday, April 7, 2004
 
Re: The Organists Dilemma --  Was RE: Easter Postludes
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
Re: The Organists Dilemma --  Was RE: Easter Postludes
  by "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net>
Re: Easter postludes
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Boellmann Toccata
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
French Romantic Toccatas
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: Boellmann Toccata
  by <OrganMD@aol.com>
Re: Easter postludes
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: NPM Regional Convention in Chicago
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: St. Thomas subway (was The Lewis organ in Southwark Cathedral)
  by "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com>
Re: Boellmann Toccata
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: The Organists Dilemma --  Was RE: Easter Postludes
  by "Richard Huggins" <huggins88@yahoo.com>
Re: St. Thomas subway (was The Lewis organ in Southwark Cathedral)
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
RE: altering the alter
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
Re: French Romantic Toccatas
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
Re: French Romantic Toccatas
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
"Churchly" pieces, was French Romantic Toccatas
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: Flag near altar, I guess
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
RE: French Romantic Toccatas
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
Re: The Organists Dilemma --  Was RE: Easter Postludes
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: altering the alter
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: St. Thomas subway
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Re: French Romantic Toccatas
  by <giwro@adelphia.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: The Organists Dilemma -- Was RE: Easter Postludes From: <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 12:12:14 EDT   Hello llwheels@mac.com,     In reference to your comment: I've been there many times with both pipe and non-pipe instruments. Which do you do??? I always play the best I can. It's usually safe to assume that the = organ's squawks/grunts/crackles are common knowledge.   When I'm on the bench during a service, I'm there to worship, not display faults in the organ and disrupt others' worship. There's time to kvetch = about the instrument during coffee hour.   Victoria    
(back) Subject: Re: The Organists Dilemma -- Was RE: Easter Postludes From: "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net> Date: Wed, 07 Apr 2004 12:20:07 -0400       On 7 Apr 2004 at 11:05, Larry Wheelock expounded:   > I've been there many times with both pipe and non-pipe instruments. > Which do you do???   Time it well. Need a new instrument? Is the church in a position to = launch a capital campaign for a new one? Then register ALL your music to let the = flaws show through.   If the congregation doesn't hear that there's a problem with the = instrument, then there isn't one. Head in the sand. If they don't hear it, then it = doesn't exist.   --Shirley        
(back) Subject: Re: Easter postludes From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 09:24:45 -0700 (PDT)   LOL hi Tom I use Boellmann to close my accompanying Nosferatu, as well. Right when he = goes up to try to get Ellen, and it perfectly comes to a close. But it = salso great for Easter Another Great Easter Po... The Lemmen's Fanfare!         From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html   --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Small Business $15K Web Design Giveaway - Enter today  
(back) Subject: Boellmann Toccata From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 09:31:48 -0700 (PDT)   unfashionable!?!?! My signiture piece, the entire Suite Gothique is not = unfashionable (giggle) I know one thing...its one piece that the general public finds to be most = memorable. I did a concert for a church in DC once which consited of 3 = toccatas: the Bach 565, Widor and Boellmann...the crowd could not get over = the Boellmann and called it "exquisite", and the Widor "Classy".   Well, we do have our opinions at pipechat. thats what mkes this group more = colorful than the other.     From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html   --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Small Business $15K Web Design Giveaway - Enter today  
(back) Subject: French Romantic Toccatas From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 09:46:24 -0700 (PDT)   Ok.... Boellmann is usually among our undergrad studies. But does that = make it an inferior piece? Most of the French toccatas are based on some arpeggiated figure(most,not = all, and im not the authority on this topic, so offer talks) The Widor is = also an arpeggiation, with exchanges from hand to hand, right?     From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html   --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Small Business $15K Web Design Giveaway - Enter today  
(back) Subject: Re: Boellmann Toccata From: <OrganMD@aol.com> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 12:57:31 EDT   For decades, the Gothic Suite has been a hit with the noon day recital = crowd in the Mormon Tabernacle. Sometimes we organists are guilty of playing to =   each other rather than the public at large. We will be on the bench = longer and playing for larger audiences if we always keep that in mind.   Rocky Mountain Organ Co., Inc. William S (Bill) Hesterman, President   We proudly represent Austin Organs, Inc. in the western US.    
(back) Subject: Re: Easter postludes From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 09:58:28 -0700 (PDT)   YES!!!! The Farnam O Filli et Fillae!!!!!! O mercy Yes!     Patricia/Thomas Gregory <tgregory@speeddial.net> wrote: Greetings:   After a long prelude/w/brass ensemble + several hymns + several anthems I always looked forward to getting off the bench (probably as much as the congregation looked forward to making a quick exit).   My standard postlude was the Farnam toccata on "Ye Sons & Daughters"....short/fast/and impressive (especially on a Skinner/w/good reeds).   Now that I am in "semi-retirement" I fondly look back on Holy Week & = Easter Sunday with fond memories. Maybe we will get the eggs dyed this year.   Best wishes,   Tom Gregory         -- Thomas and Patricia Gregory 716 West College Avenue Waukesha WI USA 53186-4569 "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org       From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html   --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Small Business $15K Web Design Giveaway - Enter today  
(back) Subject: Re: NPM Regional Convention in Chicago From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 10:05:52 -0700 (PDT)   Well hey Paul! I may go there...Im Director of Sacred Music and Organist at a larger RC = church in Chicago and I think im pretty competent (giggle) i too noticed that it seems to be very little offered for those who are = already organists. BUT thats great for those who want to learn how to = play. I dunno...we'll see.       From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html   --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Small Business $15K Web Design Giveaway - Enter today  
(back) Subject: Re: St. Thomas subway (was The Lewis organ in Southwark Cathedral) From: "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com> Date: Wed, 07 Apr 2004 10:05:54 -0700     ----- Original Message ----- Where would St. Thomas, Fifth Avenue, N= ew York > >be without the subway trains? > > Somewhere other than on Fifth Avenue, I suppose! Which was there f= irst, > St. Thomas's or the subway? > Actually the problem is 53rd St., not Fifth Avenue. (It's the "E" tra= in going to and from Queens.) I think St. Thomas (built 1914) predates t= he subway by a decade or so, but I could easily be wrong. The most spect= acular recording of the subway of which I'm aware occurs during the middle o= f the Liszt Ad Nos in Charles Swisher's recording of Mme. Durufl=E9's 1966 performance. It almost seems that a careful listener should be able t= o tell whether the train is east- or westbound.   And now that I've wasted a few minutes, time to settle down with taxe= s, arggh.   MAF      
(back) Subject: Re: Boellmann Toccata From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 10:15:35 -0700 (PDT)       OrganMD@aol.com wrote:For decades, the Gothic Suite has been a hit with = the noon day recital crowd in the Mormon Tabernacle. Sometimes we = organists are guilty of playing to each other rather than the public at = large. We will be on the bench longer and playing for larger audiences if = we always keep that in mind. Desiree' writes: in response PREACH!!!! AMEN! When will we learn this? I think I will continue programing it in my recitals and making marks on = people. If we keep playing these academic recitals with unfamiliar pieces that = appeal ONLY to us organists, we will continue to see college programs = close and guitars in churches.       From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html   --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Small Business $15K Web Design Giveaway - Enter today  
(back) Subject: Re: The Organists Dilemma -- Was RE: Easter Postludes From: "Richard Huggins" <huggins88@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 07 Apr 2004 12:44:54 -0500   I definitely would try to use what the instrument was best at. To me that = is what a professional does, use his or her skills and judgment to evaluate = the situation and optimize it. To hear "our organ never sounded so good" would be to me highly satisfying. With doctors the same principle is "first do = no harm."   --Richard Huggins   > From: "Larry Wheelock" <llwheels@mac.com>   > Herein lies the dilemma with which I have struggled many times over. > Should you do your best to hide the flaws of the instrument and risk > the listeners saying "Gee -- is sounds so good when he/she plays it; > why would we need a new organ?" Or, do you let the flaws shine through > - usually just a matter of trying to play the instrument as if it were > a good one and using standard registration, techniques and a practiced > 'startled' look when it misbehaves. > > I've been there many times with both pipe and non-pipe instruments. > Which do you do???    
(back) Subject: Re: St. Thomas subway (was The Lewis organ in Southwark Cathedral) From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 13:49:26 -0400   And then there are the Park Avenue Churches, St. Ignatius Loyola being the one I know best. Its two 32' stops, one flue and one reed, are nicely augmented by the Metro North Railway, going in an out of Grand Central Terminal through the long Park Avenue tunnel, creating the perfect generic 64' sound, not often at the right moment, of course. I guess Brick Church = up the avenue a bit, Keith Toth's very nice emporium, gets this as well. McNeill Robinson at Park Avenue Christian should benefit from this, also.   When St. Ignatius was built in 1898, the tunnel was not a tunnel, but = rather a sunken railway track for steam trains, sending noise and soot throughout the neighborhood. The advent of diesel and electric trains, and the = presence of tremendous wealth in the great apartment towers beginning to line both sides of the avenue, made it possible, even necessary, to close in the tunnel.   Cheers,   Malcolm - back on the Organ bench!     ----- Original Message ----- From: "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, April 07, 2004 1:05 PM Subject: Re: St. Thomas subway (was The Lewis organ in Southwark = Cathedral)       ----- Original Message ----- Where would St. Thomas, Fifth Avenue, New = York > >be without the subway trains? > > Somewhere other than on Fifth Avenue, I suppose! Which was there first, > St. Thomas's or the subway? > Actually the problem is 53rd St., not Fifth Avenue. (It's the "E" train going to and from Queens.) I think St. Thomas (built 1914) predates the subway by a decade or so, but I could easily be wrong. The most = spectacular recording of the subway of which I'm aware occurs during the middle of the Liszt Ad Nos in Charles Swisher's recording of Mme. Durufl=E9's 1966 performance. It almost seems that a careful listener should be able to = tell whether the train is east- or westbound.   And now that I've wasted a few minutes, time to settle down with taxes, arggh.   MAF     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org          
(back) Subject: RE: altering the alter From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 14:02:31 -0400   > Thank you Bob! I was turning four shades of blue here at my computer = as=20 I read the postings fully-competent people mis-choosing the word=20 'alter' for 'altar;' a common mistake among the laiety, but=20 embarrassing for church professions, IMHO.   Nah, a certain rectorina of my former acquaintance managed to run a = once-thriving parish into the ground in two years. When she was = appointed, they had more pledges than they knew what to do with. By the = time she left this past autumn, so little remained of either money in = the bank or warm bodies in the pews that the bishop was afraid that he'd = have to close their beautiful building. One of her favorite sermon = themes, apparently, was "the church must change... change... the church = has to CHANGE." Well, she certainly changed hers.   If we can take any satisfaction from the situation, it was that after = she harrassed the parish's beloved, and liturgically/musically = conservative, organist-choirmaster for a year, he resigned last summer, = for a parish six miles away, and several families followed him = forthwith. For many of those who remained, that was the last straw. = The clergy don't always win.              
(back) Subject: Re: French Romantic Toccatas From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 14:07:32 EDT   Desiree and List,   I'm glad to see some folks sticking up for the Boellman Toccata--and for = all those other "unfashionable" pieces people love.   What, exactly, is this business about stuff we played as undergraduates = being somehow "beneath" us now that we have jobs and have advanced beyond the technique of our Senior Recitals? Desiree, you would probably agree with = me that this is a strange way to choose repertoire--especially for Church!   If I stopped playing pieces I played in college, out would go the = Buxtehude Prelude, Fugue and Ciacconne; Several Bach trios and Chorale Preludes (including "Wachet Auf", a great favorite among congregations), not to = mention the "Gigue" Fugue; Plus some Mendelssohn, several of the Brahms 11, as well = as a smattering of Langlias and--talk about UNFASHIONABLE--even some = Karg-Elert!   And I wasn't even an Organ Major--I majored in Composition!   Very few congregations can live on a steady diet of AGO recital academic repertoire. Frankly, I attend very few organ recitals myself because most = of them are dreadfully dull. Furthermore, I take absolutely NO pleasure in = attending a colleague's recital in order to ruthlessly criticize it afterwards--a favorite passtime among some guild musicians as we all know. Desiree is = absolutely correct that if we added some accessable music to our recital programs, = our audiences would be bigger--of course, many of us are already doing that.   Just my tuppence worth, Bill H.    
(back) Subject: Re: French Romantic Toccatas From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 14:14:35 EDT   In a message dated 4/7/2004 2:08:52 PM Eastern Daylight Time, DERREINETOR@aol.com writes: If I stopped playing pieces I played in college, i once had a studio mate of mine in Cinti, who(m?) i respected immensely = and in fact hired to be the consultant on my church's new organ say to me,   you know, i wish i would have spent more time in school learning usable church rep like you di, rather than all the big stuff.   Mark S. was a gifted player, the Dupre Triptych and Reger Morning star = just rolled out of him and into our ears and hearts. i was gratified to = realize there truly was very little i learned in college that i cannot use in = church.   Well, maybe most of the Messian i could do without.   dale in Florida    
(back) Subject: "Churchly" pieces, was French Romantic Toccatas From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 12:00:12 -0700 (PDT)       DERREINETOR@aol.com wrote: Desiree and List,   I'm glad to see some folks sticking up for the Boellman Toccata--and for = all those other "unfashionable" pieces people love.   What, exactly, is this business about stuff we played as undergraduates = being somehow "beneath" us now that we have jobs and have advanced beyond = the technique of our Senior Recitals? Desiree, you would probably agree = with me that this is a strange way to choose repertoire--especially for = Church!   Desiree' Writes:   YES Bill. Exactly! I remember when I was searching for a program at first. = I specifically did not want to go int a program that would train me to be = a concert organist, but a well rounded Sacred Musician that could also = support myself by playing a concert once a month or so. i wanted a program = that would give me good, sturdy hymn playing, a technique that was solid, = and where the teacher would train me how to be a good church musician.   I even recall, the program at Birmingham Souther College REQUIRES the = Church Music majors with a concentration in Organ to learn at least 3 hymn = arrangements each semester. That was in addition to pieces that have a = "duality" about them: being great pieces for church, and that would = warrant encores at a concert. The Boellmann Suite Gothique, Buxtehude = Prelude Fugue and Chaconne, the Karg Elert Marche Triumphale, the Langlias = Organ Book and several other pieces have proven good for me in both = capacities and will remain in my repertoire until I retire from the = profession.   "If I stopped playing pieces I played in college...."   Well, when I studied with Jeff McClelland, he mad it a point to say that = if we did not take the time to learn as much as we could in undergrad = programs, we probably would NEVER learn the necessary repertoire needed = for church services. Since, when we get to masters and doctoral programs, = we are busy concentrating on our concentration projects. Which brings me = to another thing...Im doing my masters at Georgia State U...regardless of = where I live. The program requres 1 solo concert and one chamber. So for = the solo recital, I may do a recital with pieces from Guilmant's = L'organist Practique (such as the Grand Symphonic March), and do a lecture = on Church-appropriate music writted by the masters. That way Im killing = two birds with one stone...a concert...and church repertoire expansion.   So...where do the people here get the repertoire they use in church if the = toss the babies out with the bath water?       "Very few congregations can live on a steady diet of AGO recital academic = repertoire. Frankly, I attend very few organ recitals myself because most = of them are dreadfully dull...."   This is very true as well! You must know that that little old lady that = was at the last guild concert just LOVED the entire works of Clarambault = (Desiree' giggles sarcastically) If French Classical is a person thing, = play the pieces that will rouse someone...those great Noels that show the = colors and are playful.       From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html   --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Small Business $15K Web Design Giveaway - Enter today  
(back) Subject: Re: Flag near altar, I guess From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 07 Apr 2004 15:11:18 -0400   On 4/7/04 11:38 AM, "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> wrote:   > the Saint's banner (St. Leonard) to Mothers' Union, and the Scouts and > Brownies.   I can understand that each group wants it's moment in the sun (though I think it's a bit misguided). But what's the connection with Easter? Why not on Ash Wednesday, or Trinity Sunday or something? It's just that I don't get the "Easter connection." Surely the Brownies had nothing to do with THAT!   Alan    
(back) Subject: RE: French Romantic Toccatas From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 15:12:09 -0400   > Ok.... Boellmann is usually among our undergrad studies. But does = that make it an inferior piece?=20 =20 Rather than inferior, I'd call it sturdy and coarse-grained. It might = be an inferior piece to a form & analysis class, but where the = congregation talk during the postlude (i.e., probably 99% of our = churches), I feel that the setting doesn't do justice to any as fine and = subtle as a Bach fugue, whereas French toccatas survive largely = unscathed and constitute a worthy conclusion for a festive service. = They are perfect for that situation.   Today composers write in minimalist style (although it's not the fad = that it was 20 years ago). Yesterday, French composers wrote toccatas. = Am I the only one who sees an influence here, or at least a trait that = audiences might appreciate in similar manner?          
(back) Subject: Re: The Organists Dilemma -- Was RE: Easter Postludes From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 07 Apr 2004 15:16:29 -0400   On 4/7/04 12:05 PM, "Larry Wheelock" <llwheels@mac.com> wrote:   > I've been there many times with both pipe and non-pipe instruments. = Which do > you do???   How about "It depends on who's there"?   If it's a day when you want to look your very best (the bishop is there, = or something), put your best foot forward.   But when it's just "family," don't hesitate to "let it all hang out."   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: altering the alter From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 07 Apr 2004 15:18:37 -0400   On 4/7/04 12:10 PM, "Larry Wheelock" <llwheels@mac.com> wrote:   > a common mistake among the laiety, but embarrassing for church = professions   Ah, yes. The "laiety."   Alan, who can't spell either    
(back) Subject: Re: St. Thomas subway From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 07 Apr 2004 15:37:46 -0400   On 4/7/04 1:05 PM, "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com> wrote:   > Actually the problem is 53rd St., not Fifth Avenue. (It's the "E" train > going to and from Queens.) I think St. Thomas (built 1914) predates the > subway by a decade or so, but I could easily be wrong.   Surely you are quite right. Which one was PLANNED first might be more to the point, but you'd probably still be right.   St. Peter's, on Lexington, has that problem even worse (with the sanctuary floor well below ground), but they had better technology to deal with it when that was built; I don't think it's a big problem for the Klais there.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Re: French Romantic Toccatas From: <giwro@adelphia.net> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 12:41:08 -0700   one of my professors in college said to me "learn all the music you can = NOW... when you get into life after graduation, you will NOT have anywhere = NEAR the time to practice that you do now"   she was right - gone are the days of 4 to 8 hours of practice a day.... = i'm lucky to get a couple of hours a WEEK.   then, of course, at this church i am not just the organist - with all of = the non-music duties i'm more like a producer... maybe someday i can just = concentrate on music, but until then i'm glad for those hours many years = ago i spent learning the service music.   years ago when we worked together, dale told me "put your music on a = 2-year rotation, then either change churches every two years or repeat the = music... in either case, no one will ever know" i must say he was right - = i regularly repeat stuff and no one seems to notice.   ....as for french toccatas, there are more of those than one can shake a = stick at - in addition to collecting organ symphonies for the book i'm = writing, i also have been collecting toccatas, and the mind boggles at how = many there are of THOSE... mebbe i'll make a list someday...   -jonathan     > From: Keys4bach@aol.com > Date: 2004/04/07 Wed AM 11:14:35 PDT > To: pipechat@pipechat.org > Subject: Re: French Romantic Toccatas > > In a message dated 4/7/2004 2:08:52 PM Eastern Daylight Time, > DERREINETOR@aol.com writes: > If I stopped playing pieces I played in college, > i once had a studio mate of mine in Cinti, who(m?) i respected immensely = and > in fact hired to be the consultant on my church's new organ say to me, > > you know, i wish i would have spent more time in school learning usable > church rep like you di, rather than all the big stuff. > > Mark S. was a gifted player, the Dupre Triptych and Reger Morning star = just > rolled out of him and into our ears and hearts. i was gratified to = realize > there truly was very little i learned in college that i cannot use in = church. > > Well, maybe most of the Messian i could do without. > > dale in Florida > >