PipeChat Digest #4420 - Wednesday, April 7, 2004
 
Re: "Churchly" pieces, was French Romantic Toccatas
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
Lift Every Voice and Sing! Concert Tour
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
pipe organ control systems
  by "Jan S. Van Der Stad" <dorian@nac.net>
Re: French Romantic Toccatas
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Lift Every Voice and Sing! Concert Tour
  by "Melisma" <melisma@uniserve.com>
Re: "Churchly" pieces, was French Romantic Toccatas
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: PipeChat Digest #4418 - 04/07/04
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: French Romantic Toccatas et al
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: Boellmann Toccata
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Boellmann Toccata
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: NPM Regional Convention in Chicago
  by <mewzishn@optonline.net>
RE: Easter Postludes
  by "cnash cnash" <cnash@mail.fbcaiken.org>
Re: St. Thomas subway (was The Lewis organ in Southwark Cathedral)
  by <mewzishn@optonline.net>
Re: RE: Easter Postludes
  by <giwro@adelphia.net>
RE: ORGANS AT WESTMINSTER CATHEDRAL, LONDON
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
Re: Boellmann Toccata
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
RE: Easter Postludes
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: Easter Postludes
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
Re: Easter Postludes
  by "cnash cnash" <cnash@mail.fbcaiken.org>
Re: Easter Postludes
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: "Churchly" pieces, was French Romantic Toccatas From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 15:43:35 EDT   Desiree,   RIGHT ON!   And, folks, don't get me wrong--I love it all. I'm not disparraging the performance of works which are both technically and aurally demanding. = And, I'm grateful to play for a congregation which actually appreciates the = "Epilogue" from Langlais' "L'Hommage a Frescobaldi", a piece which I LOVE to play.   As for my own compositions, if they're for church, I'm not afraid to "push =   the envelope" a little. However, my undergraduate mentor, the late (and = great) Stanley Hollingsworth (who studied under Scalero and Milhaud, by the way) = gave me a great piece of advice when I was a 16 year old College Freshman, frustrated by an overload of species counterpoint exercises: "write what = you want, but don't forget that every piece benefits from having a 'hit tune'." He = couldn't be more right--and boy, did I learn how to write one which wasn't cheap.   Pax, Bill H.    
(back) Subject: Lift Every Voice and Sing! Concert Tour From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 12:49:44 -0700 (PDT)   Announcing the Lift Every Voice and Sing! Concert Tour inspired by the = doctoral dissertation of Wayne Anthony Barr A History of the Pipe Organ in = Black Churches in the U.S. Celebrating the Pipe Organ in the African-American Church with Toni-Desiree' Hines, Organist August-September 2004 Mount Zion Baptist Church, Seattle, WA Balcom-Vaughn III/29 1998 Time and Date TBA Hartford Memorial Baptist Church, Detroit, MI Petty/Madden IV/96 1988 August 29th, 2004 3 PM Homecoming Concert First Baptist Congregational Church, Chicago, IL W.W. Kimball and Company IV/77 1927 Worlds largest completely enclosed pipe organ September 5th, 2004 4 PM Program Prelude, Fugue and Chaconne D. Buxtehude Music of J.S. Bach Jesus Christ Our Savior The Holy Christ is Arisen (Orgelbuchlein) Prelude and Fugue in E Minor, BWV 533 Transcriptions for the Organ Largo in G G.F. Handel/D. Bish Come, Sweetest Death J.S. Bach/T.D. Hines Hymn: Lift Every Voice and Sing! Intermission Intermezzo in D Minor T. D. Hines Adoration Florence B. Price Tuba March in D T.D. hines Cantilene in G Major Malcolm Archer Prelude in G Minor Gabriel Pierne Suite Gothique Leon Boellmann III. Priere A Notre Dame IV. Toccata Hymn: Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord God Almighty Introduction from Majestic Beginnings by T.D. Hines (available at = www.frogmusic.com ) Encore Piece (pending     From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html   --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Small Business $15K Web Design Giveaway - Enter today  
(back) Subject: pipe organ control systems From: "Jan S. Van Der Stad" <dorian@nac.net> Date: Wed, 07 Apr 2004 15:48:28 -0400   Dear List:   We maintain a small 2 manual, 14 rank pipe organ that is in need of a new control system. The console has been somewhat electrified but retains an ailing pneumatic combination action. The church has limited funds, but wants something that is both efficient AND effective with regards to MIDI interfacing as well as general function.   I would appreciate input from the list as to what systems are worthy of consideration.   Cordially,   Jan S. Van Der Stad      
(back) Subject: Re: French Romantic Toccatas From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 07 Apr 2004 15:53:42 -0400   On 4/7/04 2:14 PM, "Keys4bach@aol.com" <Keys4bach@aol.com> wrote:   > Well, maybe most of the Messian i could do without. > =20 Well, Dale, right now, maybe. But you=B9re just a kid. Your day of =B3growing into=B2 Messiaen will come, I think. I hope. (I really like it, but can=B9t play it at ALL!)   Alan      
(back) Subject: Re: Lift Every Voice and Sing! Concert Tour From: "Melisma" <melisma@uniserve.com> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 12:57:32 -0700   Desiree, you will please tell us when the Seattle concert gets fixed for - and if you could give us directions to find the venue, please? That's the closest one to me, and I might just try to wheedle a trip down there out = of my parents - or plan a trip to see friends in the area - so I can attend.   Best,   Melisma (going back into hiding here under her Rock)           ----- Original Message ----- From: T.Desiree' Hines To: pipechat@pipechat.org Sent: Wednesday, April 07, 2004 12:49 PM Subject: Lift Every Voice and Sing! Concert Tour     Announcing the Lift Every Voice and Sing! Concert Tour inspired by the doctoral dissertation of Wayne Anthony Barr A History of the Pipe Organ in Black Churches in the U.S. Celebrating the Pipe Organ in the African-American Church with Toni-Desiree' Hines, Organist   August-September 2004   Mount Zion Baptist Church, Seattle, WA Balcom-Vaughn III/29 1998 Time and Date TBA      
(back) Subject: Re: "Churchly" pieces, was French Romantic Toccatas From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 12:59:58 -0700 (PDT)   My thing is I love to play big pieces for church. But in my course of = study, I prefer to learn those pieces that are pleasing to BOTH sects of = listeners...organist and the public at large. Let's just say that people = at t Saint Turibius are remaining to hear the postludes. i do everything = from trumpet tunes, hymn arrangements, to Alain's litanies. Actually, I = did that for prelude number 2 on Palm Sun. And same with the Lanquetuit Toccata. JUST got it. Im learning it for use = in both ways. Its catchy and Jazzy. Hmm...why don't we think of bigger pieces that are good for church and = concert: Toccatas of Widor, Gigout, Boellmann, Mulet, Lanquetuit Several of the Vignt Quatre Pieces en Style Libre by Vierne (The = Divertisement is fun!) Franck's Priere, Cantabile, Pastorale, and Prelude Fugue and Var. Viernes Carrillon of Westminster tons of Guilmant The hymn arrangements of Diane Bish, Dan Miller, and others (who by the = way always include hymn arrangement in their very exhaustive list of = conserts) others?       From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html   --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Small Business $15K Web Design Giveaway - Enter today  
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #4418 - 04/07/04 From: "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 21:05:50 +0100 (BST)   Sorry if my memory has not served me right on that, Colin. (Colin Mitchell wrote "I don't know where John gets the idea that I believe Willis gained his reputation by re-building Lewis organs! Willis more or less exterminated Lewis, and put their name to his last works.") I was thinking back to a previous discussion on Lewis and Willis on pipechat, but I have no archives available for reference so my memory must be playing me up.   Harrison's have always been high quality builders - but looking at a list of the Willis organs they rebuilt in the early twentieth century cannot have harmed their reputation. They include   Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford Carlisle Cathedral Durham Cathedral Salisbury Cathedral St David=92s Cathedral, Wales Gloucester Cathedral Lincoln Cathedral Wells Cathedral St Mary=92s Cathedral, Edinburgh St Bees Priory The Royal Albert Hall Huddersfield Town Hall Reading Town hall Balliol College Oxford =96 Chapel and Dining Hall St Augustine, Kilburn and Hampstead Parish Church to name but a few.   Yes, of course they (Harrison's) built very fine new organs, and have continued to do so to this day. Your mentioning St Bee's brings back memories - I wandered in there some years ago, asked if I could play, and then climbed up to a wonderfully antique ivory and oak console, switched on and was overwhelmed by the sounds that came forth. The Harrison rebuild at Kilburn, where you presided for a time, is also one of my favourites - Harrison rebuild of a Willis (at any rate, it has a Harrison & Harrison nameplate on it, I think!)   I am reminded of advice given me by a car dealer friend of mine who said "if you want to get a good price for your car, replace the pedal rubbers and the Number Plates." Maybe there is a lesson here for organ builders. A good brass plate adds thousands on to the price. (I think Allen organs come with a brass plate!) It is some time since I looked at a Willis brass plate - but I seem to remember that they had a Latin inscription on them "me fecit ....", and I think they mentioned the Rotunda Works. Does this ring a bell anywhere? St Anselm's, Hatch End comes to mind. This was originally built by Willis in 1899 for the Royal Academy of Music, and moved to St Anselm's in 1911. It must have been one of the last organs Fr. Willis himself built as he died in 1901. It was within cycling distance of my home, and I used to play it regularly as a teenager. You can get more information on Father Willis at http://www.willis-organs.com/history.html Most organ builders have a fairly standard set of pipe dimensions - they modify them according to circumstances, and are usually voiced in the factory before installation. How the "end product" sounds depends to a vast extent on the siting and acoustics of the building. I don't know to what extent present day organ builders still roll their own - but I guess that a lot of builders buy at least some of their pipes from trade suppliers. John Foss   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D www.johnfoss.gr http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/ Topics of the week : 90% in favour of a change of government Spring in the air     ____________________________________________________________ Yahoo! Messenger - Communicate instantly..."Ping" your friends today! Download Messenger Now http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/download/index.html  
(back) Subject: Re: French Romantic Toccatas et al From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 13:13:45 -0700 (PDT)     I love Dieu Parmi Nous! And while I do love Langlais, I think the Te Deum and a few other pieces = will work in church. Fete...let's save that one for AGO competitions!     From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html   --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Small Business $15K Web Design Giveaway - Enter today  
(back) Subject: Re: Boellmann Toccata From: "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 21:16:57 +0100 (BST)   Well, it just goes to show that the "Public's" taste is pretty appaling, doesn't it! At Christmas, thanks to Bruce Miles, I played Sussex Downs by Billy Mayerl as a voluntary - not at the main service but a Children's service. "Now, that was nice!" one old lady said. "I wish you'd play more pieces like that", said another! So perhaps it's not worth all the effort of learning Vierne Symphonies and so on when "junk" like this(the Boellmann)is available. Mind you, Sussex Downs is a hell of a sight harder and rather better musically than the Boellmann Toccata which I would rate at Grade IV Associated Board. John Foss     =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D www.johnfoss.gr http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/ Topics of the week : 90% in favour of a change of government Spring in the air     ____________________________________________________________ Yahoo! Messenger - Communicate instantly..."Ping" your friends today! Download Messenger Now http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/download/index.html  
(back) Subject: Re: Boellmann Toccata From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 13:27:37 -0700 (PDT)       John Foss <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> wrote: Well, it just goes to show that the "Public's" taste is pretty appaling, doesn't it! At Christmas, thanks to Bruce Miles, I played Sussex Downs by Billy Mayerl as a voluntary - not at the main service but a Children's service. "Now, that was nice!" one old lady said. "I wish you'd play more pieces like that", said another! So perhaps it's not worth all the effort of learning Vierne Symphonies and so on when "junk" like this(the Boellmann)is available. Mind you, Sussex Downs is a hell of a sight harder and rather better musically than the Boellmann Toccata which I would rate at Grade IV Associated Board. John Foss     Desiree writes NICELY remembering the pipechat rules:   Well...if thats the case that Boellmann's Toccata is "junk"...there are a = lot of people out there who have bad taste and one persons junk is = another's treasure. Those treasures pay my rent in Downtown Chicago.   Of course its worth the effort to learn Vierne Symphonies...but few of the = momements have a place in worship services. BUT they do make great pieces = in concerts. I would never do anything other than movements from Vierne's = G Minor in church. Now, the Finale from his 6th is one of my favorite = pieces. BUT, I would reserve that for concert, as its style is totally = concert fare to show the concert virtuosity of a concert player.       From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html   --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Small Business $15K Web Design Giveaway - Enter today  
(back) Subject: Re: NPM Regional Convention in Chicago From: <mewzishn@optonline.net> Date: Wed, 07 Apr 2004 16:40:54 -0400   IIRC, the organization's acronym is pronounced "napalm." Although the organization is well intentioned there are some who feel it's had that effect on R.C. worship.   Kenneth L. Sybesma Choirmaster and Organist Church of the Advent, Westbury NY Temple Organist & Director of Children's Music Temple Or Elohim, Jericho NY   On 7 Apr 2004, at 9.45 AM, Alan Freed wrote:   > Phil: I hope you go. And I look forward to your report. I OFTEN find > myself urging RC people to connect with NPM, but don't know whether I'm > going them a favor or not. I HOPE I am!    
(back) Subject: RE: Easter Postludes From: "cnash cnash" <cnash@mail.fbcaiken.org> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 16:48:27 -0400   Miss (Tony-male) as I remember you Hines...   I understand your take on the music. It is obvious, however, that you = allow your congregation to hear high school and lower level undergrad = works and call them major concert pieces. Every piece you have = listed...most of us learned before college or during freshman undergrad = levels. Have you ever thought about going BACK to school and finishing? = Perhaps that not only would allow you to enhance your playing skills to = actually be able to play these pieces you talk about...but your writing = skills could be improved as well. You have some very musical things going = on in your "book" however...4 measures of block chords or triplet rhythms = going NOWHERE and then playing the last line of the hymn does NOT cut it = in the REAL organ world.   Christopher    
(back) Subject: Re: St. Thomas subway (was The Lewis organ in Southwark Cathedral) From: <mewzishn@optonline.net> Date: Wed, 07 Apr 2004 16:49:30 -0400   IIRC, it would most likely have to be the west-bound train, since the east-bound tunnel is below that for the west-bound. Think of it as a Schoenstein doubly-enclosed set-up, if Schoenstein built subways. That stop serves both the E and V lines, imagine the noise in the church if both tunnels were at the same level, almost constant at rush hours.   Kenneth L. Sybesma Choirmaster and Organist Church of the Advent, Westbury NY Temple Organist & Director of Children's Music Temple Or Elohim, Jericho NY   On 7 Apr 2004, at 1.05 PM, M Fox wrote:   > ----- Original Message ----- Where would St. Thomas, Fifth Avenue, > New York >>> be without the subway trains? >> >> Somewhere other than on Fifth Avenue, I suppose! Which was there >> first, >> St. Thomas's or the subway? >> > Actually the problem is 53rd St., not Fifth Avenue. (It's the "E" train > going to and from Queens.) (snip) > It almost seems that a careful listener should be able to tell > whether the train is east- or westbound.    
(back) Subject: Re: RE: Easter Postludes From: <giwro@adelphia.net> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 14:00:30 -0700   MEOW! MEOW!   ok now, let's not get nasty here.... this is a FRIENDLY list   jeez.... and people wonder how organists get such a bad name as = insufferable prima donnas...   superior attitudes like THIS is what does it...   nothing wrong with a little FRIENDLY banter, but this was downright NASTY   give me an organist with some ENTHUSIASM over a cold overeducated = (*$&#$(%&^#$ anyday   -jonathan > From: "cnash cnash" <cnash@mail.fbcaiken.org> > Date: 2004/04/07 Wed PM 01:48:27 PDT > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Subject: RE: Easter Postludes > > Miss (Tony-male) as I remember you Hines... > > I understand your take on the music. It is obvious, however, that you = allow your congregation to hear high school and lower level undergrad = works and call them major concert pieces. Every piece you have = listed...most of us learned before college or during freshman undergrad = levels. Have you ever thought about going BACK to school and finishing? = Perhaps that not only would allow you to enhance your playing skills to = actually be able to play these pieces you talk about...but your writing = skills could be improved as well. You have some very musical things going = on in your "book" however...4 measures of block chords or triplet rhythms = going NOWHERE and then playing the last line of the hymn does NOT cut it = in the REAL organ world. > > Christopher    
(back) Subject: RE: ORGANS AT WESTMINSTER CATHEDRAL, LONDON From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 17:02:24 -0400   If you have a Groves Dictionary 5th ed. (1954) nearby-- the stop list is = in there (at the end of the "Organ" article).   I distinctly recall this because seeing it as a kid was my encounter = with the existence of a place known as Westminster Cathedral. I = suspected that it was not Westminster Abbey, else why wouldn't they call = it so, but I also knew that London's cathedral was Saint Paul's, so what = was this "Westminster Cathedral" place? Well, all in God's good time, I = would find out.   The action of the gallery organ is (was) tubular pneumatic, but it also = controlled from the apse console electrically. "...a notable example of = 'parallel' action, being wired in parallel with the tubular pneumatic = action in the west gallery, nearly 300 feet distant, where the original = 1922 console is retained for recitals and other appropriate occasions." = Nicholas Kynaston's recording on this organ, including most memorably = the "Combat de la Mort et de la Vie" from Les Corps Glorieux by = Messiaen, was one of the standout contributions to the Great Cathedral = Organ Series in the late 60s. I definitely wanted to visit if I ever = got to London, and once there in 1972, made sure to attend any recitals = on weekday evenings in the summer.   As I recall, the gallery organ was still tubular-pneumatic when, thanks = to Colin Mawby's natural, matter-of-fact, unassuming kindness, a London = friend and I got a crack at it after one of these recitals. Before = leaving, he carefully showed us the way we should take afterwords, = through the nave area and around the south transept all by means of the = triforium; then down a staircase near the east end, and along a = corridor extending further east for almost a block.   As we played away with delight, the custodians gradually shut the place = up, turned off the lights, and left us alone up there. It was after 11 = pm. when we decided to leave. We locked the wrought-iron gate to the = gallery and proceeded along the path that Colin had showed us, only to = encounter a door that someone had locked in the transept area. Now, = this would have been just the excuse we needed to return to that = marvelous organ and play the rest of the night, which I wouldn't have = minded in the least; but unfortunately we had locked the way back = ourselves. I thought that I *might* be able to scramble over the top = and unlock it from the organ gallery side, but George wasn't so keen on = that idea, especially as we were up high and in the dark. Finally we = found an intercom telephone, started punching numbers at random, and = eventually roused a priest who sent rescue after fifteen minutes more. = I'll always have fond memories of the place, and of Mr. Mawby, thanks to = that little adventure. (All's well that ends well. If we'd had to camp = out the rest of the night on a marble floor in a corridor, I'd probably = be less enthusiastic.)=20      
(back) Subject: Re: Boellmann Toccata From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 17:10:18 EDT   Mr. Foss,   I suppose that the "public's" taste has always been in need of elevation. After all, one can't expect everyone who comes to church (or to a concert) = to have an university degree in organ. I find, however, that the best way to = elevate taste is to a) draw folks in with some things which are at least decent = music and accessible, and b) do lots of TEACHING--on a layman's level--to help churchgoers and concertgoers to appreciate music WE like. I don't do many recitals, but when I do, like Desiree (I believe she said she does this), = I almost always do spoken programme notes which are geared toward helping people = who are not musicians appreciate what's coming next WITHOUT insulting anyone's intelligence. Perhaps this is rather informal and American, but it works. = I have done this when conducting orchestra concerts as well, and it has always been = very well received--except by the staunchest of snobs.   And regarding musical tastes, they change much faster in the academy then they do in public life. While one shouldn't be a slave to the mob, it = doesn't hurt to bring audiences along gently--they'll come! The failure to do so = is a major problem for church and concert music alike in our post-modern era.   Apropos questionable taste and snobbery, I have just been browsing through = my copy of the 1906 English Hymnal (actually, it's one of Everett Titcomb's = old copies) and find amusing that there are some tunes and texts which I = myself might call bordering on the tasteless--despite the venerable RVW's = assertion in the Preface that (and I paraphrase) the volume contains nothing which is corrupted by popular or sentimental tastes(!). Compared to some of what I = see in this revered document, the Boellmann Toccata in question is highbrow--and certainly less contrived and stiff.   Joseph Clokey once said "The purpose of worship is to elevate, not to degrade. The quality of the music used should be above rather than below = the cultural level of the congregation. If the music seems to be 'over your head', the best plan is to raise your head". While I agree with this, I would add the = caveat that it is the organist's duty to assist the laity in this endeavor.   Then again, I am only a tiny little Choirmaster in a tiny little Anglo-Catholic parish in a smallish city in the (former) Colonies. Perhaps = I have alot to learn about good taste.   Pax, Bill H. St. John's Bowdoin St. (Former Cowley Mission) Boston    
(back) Subject: RE: Easter Postludes From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 14:12:12 -0700 (PDT)   While you have GREATLY insulted me... there is no telling how many others = you have offended       From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html   --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Small Business $15K Web Design Giveaway - Enter today  
(back) Subject: Re: Easter Postludes From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 17:15:45 EDT   If Desiree is referring to the post I THINK she's referring to, count me among the offended.   Pax, Bill H.    
(back) Subject: Re: Easter Postludes From: "cnash cnash" <cnash@mail.fbcaiken.org> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 17:32:08 -0400   I say it out of love and concern....not to offend....someone literally = sent one of her pieces around our AGO chapter as an April Fools Joke!   C.N    
(back) Subject: Re: Easter Postludes From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 17:30:17 EDT   In a message dated 4/7/04 4:16:32 PM Eastern Standard Time, DERREINETOR@aol.com writes:   << If Desiree is referring to the post I THINK she's referring to, count = me among the offended. >>   Although I normally eschew "AMEN" posts, I feel I must add mine here.   Richard Spittel Baltimore, MD