PipeChat Digest #4428 - Sunday, April 11, 2004
 
Re: Suite Gothique...
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Suite Gothique...
  by <DarrylbytheSea@aol.com>
Re: ETHICS-was Organ showpieces made playable (x-posted)
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Suite Gothique...entertainment value??
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: Holy Cross Lutheran, St. Louis City, 1902 Kilgen
  by "littlebayus@yahoo.com" <littlebayus@yahoo.com>
Re: Suite Gothique...entertainment value??
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Blessed Easter! (X-Posted)
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
Re: ethics
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: ethics
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: ethics
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: Suite Gothique...entertainment value??
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: ethics
  by "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org>
Its done and He's Risen!
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Sneering and Snobbery
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Flentrop (Biggs) Organ at the German Museum at Harvard
  by "nycchelsea@yahoo.com" <nycchelsea@yahoo.com>
Re: Suite Gothique
  by "Christopher Howerter" <OrgelspielerKMD@msn.com>
Forthcoming Program in Milwaukee 4/18/04
  by "John Seboldt" <rohrwerk@seboldt.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Suite Gothique... From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 02:41:23 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   It's self inflicted Douglas!   The Toccata from the "Suite Gothique" is one of only THREE organ pieces regularly played on the BBC Radio2 programme "Your hundred best tunes" on a Sunday evening.(I'm sure you will not need to know what the other two are!)   It may not be great organ music, but it is very, very effective. I personally like it, if only because it is quite "horror movie" material and the first French Toccata I ever learned.   Organists don't have to play to the strotosphere ALL the time, do they?   I'll just go and brush up Nevin's "Will 'O the Wisp" now!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- "Douglas A. Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com> wrote: > I find it most interesting that members of this list > would deem a certain > piece of music "unsuitable"   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Tax Center - File online by April 15th http://taxes.yahoo.com/filing.html  
(back) Subject: Re: Suite Gothique... From: <DarrylbytheSea@aol.com> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 06:00:23 EDT   Good mornig, Y'all!   As I've been reading all these notes about the Toccata from the 'Suite Gothique', I was reminded of an experience I often had at Coral Ridge. One = of our night guards, the one who worked weekends to supplement their income since = he had 2 kids in college, loved this piece. He'd heard Diane play it, etc., = etc., etc., and it was his favorite piece. He always (I mean always) asked me if = I would play it for him. I took great delight in occasionally obliging him. = Early on he told me he wanted me to use more trumpets (all of the chamades, of course), so I then established the ritual of letting him register the = piece. I'd start out with fonds and anches at 8 and 4, and then let him have a go at = it. Of course, he chose all the stop knobs with red letters (reeds were engraved = in red), but nonethless, he was in "hog heaven" while he added stop after = stop after stop, then with everything to everything on (full couplers, too!), I =   played the final cadence. Whew! It was loud, but his face was a sea of = smiles!   The best part of the story was that he was one of our biggest ambassadors = of the organ. He told visitors from far and near about the organ, about our program, about us, and about "his" church.   Yours,   Darryl by the Sea    
(back) Subject: Re: ETHICS-was Organ showpieces made playable (x-posted) From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 08:08:57 -0400   On 4/10/04 5:49 PM, "Gfc234@aol.com" <Gfc234@aol.com> wrote:   > One of my teachers once told me, "God is in the details." It's true...   You studied with Mies van der Rohe? . . . . Oh, not likely. But your teacher was quoting him. And it IS true, indeed.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Suite Gothique...entertainment value?? From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 09:05:26 EDT   Leaping into the fray with flame-proof organmasters on...   While (some of us) us organist types like to go recitals to hear the 'historically informed' performances of our peers (and = superiors/inferiors) the GENERAL PUBILC goes to organ recitals (and other musical events for that = matter) in part to be >>entertained<< and not necessarily to be "educated". Those organists who not only play musically but present a varied, = listener-friendly program will do more to promote the future of the organ than so-called eliteists whose mission is to educate the great unwashed. This is in part what makes = going to recitals by the likes of Virgil Fox, Carlo Curley et al not only = musically edifying, but FUN...and therein lies a part of the key to attracting a = wider listening audinece for the instrument which we all love and wish to see = continue to flourish.   Is there a place for the "historically-correct" (or what we perceive to be =   such) performance practice? Of course there is, but not at the expense of listener friendliness. I have sat thru too many "historically informed" = recitals that failed to inspire me despite the note-perfectness of the playing. If = you don't connect to people's emotion (at some level) they will not respond positively (IMHO).   Rick in VA    
(back) Subject: Re: Holy Cross Lutheran, St. Louis City, 1902 Kilgen From: "littlebayus@yahoo.com" <littlebayus@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 06:29:42 -0700 (PDT)   Travis,   Travis,   A direct e-mail to you....   Can I still listen to the files you mentioned in your e-mail below???   I went to   briefcase.yahoo.com/tlevans@sbcglobal.net   and received the message, "Access denied."   What should I have typed in my browser?   Best wishes,     Morton Belcher         --- "Travis L. Evans" <tevansmo@prodigy.net> wrote: > Yesterday, on a spur of the moment I headed to Holy > Cross in the city and made some impromtu recordings > w/ > my minidisc recorder. I went without shoes and > music, > so grabbed a hymnal and just played for a couple > hours. Most of what I did was on a meditative > level, > was a way to relax a bit. So if you'd like to hear > this wonderful instrument. Go to: > > briefcase.yahoo.com/tlevans@sbcglobal.net > > they will be located under the "Holy Cross Lutheran > St. Louis City" > > There are a couple that were pieces I sight read > that > were laying on the organ (Track 1 and Track 2). > > Hope you enjoy. > > Travis > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Tax Center - File online by April 15th http://taxes.yahoo.com/filing.html  
(back) Subject: Re: Suite Gothique...entertainment value?? From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 21:56:14 +0800   Spot on, Rick. You have got it right!You can take off your flame proof = gear because a lot of us will agree with you. Bob Elms. ----- Original Message -----=20 From: RMaryman@aol.com=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Sunday, April 11, 2004 9:05 PM Subject: Re: Suite Gothique...entertainment value??     Leaping into the fray with flame-proof organmasters on...   While (some of us) us organist types like to go recitals to hear the = 'historically informed' performances of our peers (and = superiors/inferiors) the GENERAL PUBILC goes to organ recitals (and = other musical events for that matter) in part to be >>entertained<< and = not necessarily to be "educated". Those organists who not only play = musically but present a varied, listener-friendly program will do more = to promote the future of the organ than so-called eliteists whose = mission is to educate the great unwashed. This is in part what makes = going to recitals by the likes of Virgil Fox, Carlo Curley et al not = only musically edifying, but FUN...and therein lies a part of the key to = attracting a wider listening audinece for the instrument which we all = love and wish to see continue to flourish.=20   Is there a place for the "historically-correct" (or what we perceive = to be such) performance practice? Of course there is, but not at the = expense of listener friendliness. I have sat thru too many "historically = informed" recitals that failed to inspire me despite the = note-perfectness of the playing. If you don't connect to people's = emotion (at some level) they will not respond positively (IMHO).   Rick in VA  
(back) Subject: Blessed Easter! (X-Posted) From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 09:49:56 -0500   He has Risen! He has risen indeed!   We just returned from a wonderful Easter Sunrise Service at St. Paul's Lutheran Church in Decatur, IL. To keep this organic, pieces played included selections by Paul Manz, Charles Ore and the traditional Jesus Christ has risen today. . . There were others, but it was difficult to remember through the tears of joy. I forgot to grab a bulletin. . .   We will soon leave to attend another service with our Daughter, grandsons and (hopefully!) our Son-in-Law.   Just wanted to take a moment during this "in-between moment" to wish everyone God's richest blessings and an enjoyable Easter, as you celebrate this Blessed day with you and yours.   Hallelujah and AMEN!   Faithfully,   Rich & Joan Schneider -- Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO <>< Schneider Pipe Organs, Inc. 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (877) 944-2454 TOLL-FREE (217) 944-2527 FAX arpschneider@starband.net Home Office EMAIL arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com URL ADDRESS  
(back) Subject: Re: ethics From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 14:51:23 -0400   Dear Greg,   Methinks this Organist doth protest too much. I agree with the idea that = this kind of a simplification, which I have not seen either, is not a = fair representation of the art of the composer. I cannot imagine feeling = right or comfortable playing such a thing. I can't, however, quite make = the leap to a point that would make it an insult to Vierne or Widor, or = whomever. When I write my spectacular Toccata, a magnum opus to beat all = magnum(?) opera, always heard on the concert circuit, where it will = become a de rigeur work to program, I want to hear it complete and = unadulterated. But should I be anything but flattered when Miss or Mr. = Left Toe Susie/Sammy plays it in church on Easter Sunday. As a living = (barely) composer, I will have either made or approved the = simplification, and so, hey, there will be a royalty in the sale. I do = think that if my simplification is decently done, Mr. and Mrs. Left Toe = will still have a chance to make a spiritual connection to the composer = - me!   Greg, we got troubles, us and our instrument, but I do not see this = leading "to the Organ being insulted and disrespected even more by other = instrumentalists."   With a touch of uncertainty, my old friend Felix Aprahamian, then doing = a bit of work for Associated Music Publishers, ushered along the = publication of a particularly taxing piece by Jeanne Demessieux, = assuming it would not do well, as so few could ever play it. It sold = like gangbusters, and Felix learned that tons of Organists bought the = piece, just to sit it on the music desks on their instruments, so that = those going by would be really impressed. Most of the scores were never = opened. Does this have relevance to the discussion in hand? I don't = know. I am ready to crash after a brass rehearsal Wednesday, Maundy = Thursday festivities, Good Friday, Holy Saturday full choir rehearsal at = 2, The Vigil until late, and Easter too early! A good time was had by = all, but I am out of fuel right now.   Greg, I think you are so often right on, I look forward to the = refreshment that comes from your postings. I feel like, perhaps, this = time, you were suffering from a bit of Holy Week Shell Shock. If there = was no way my abilities would allow me to play some great toccata in the = repertoire, I would go without, rather than playing a simplified = version, but I am not so quick to condemn others who would. There are = lots of nuances to consider here, including in what circumstances was = this arrangement played.=20   All the best, =20   Malcolm ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Gfc234@aol.com=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Saturday, April 10, 2004 9:19 PM Subject: ethics     In a message dated 4/10/2004 7:42:22 AM Central Daylight Time, = DarrylbytheSea@aol.com writes: I was surprised to see this link to the OHS catalogue: http://www.ohscatalog.org/ohscatalog/orshowmadpla1.html   Although I've purchased a zillion cd's from OHs, I've never = purchased an actual score. I'm curious who is the arranger for these = simplified arrangements and the publisher. Did I miss something? Did anyone else think twice when they saw this book? I have a few = issues with it. I have never seen it-but am going to ASSUME the = following things:   1. It makes the pieces easier by leaving out the tiny details and = virtuosic sections. 2. Most people who would purchase this book are trained organists, = have probably heard, and even "attempted" the works (in their proper = form)-and are looking for an easy way out.   Could the following be possible results?   1. Someone plays a piece in its edited form-and mentions nothing about = it being edited-this means that the organist has MISLEAD his = audience-and ultimately insulted the composer and our instrument. =20 2. Even if the organist does mention that it was edited-the = composer's name will be remembered by the audience-not the editor. = MISLEADING 3. The organist is cheating himself out of the "spiritual" connection = and understanding made with the composer. A connection that can be = attained only through hours of diligent work 4. Could this lead to the organ being insulted and disrespected even = more by other instrumentalists? 5. Does this make the organ and its rich history look bad? 6. Is it disrespectful to the people who have worked hard to learn = the works in their proper form?   One of my teachers once told me, "God is in the details." It's = true... Happy Easter. gfc     Gregory Ceurvorst M.M. Organ Performance Student Northwestern University Director of Music and Organist St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL 847.332.2788 home 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com  
(back) Subject: Re: ethics From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 15:01:03 EDT   If there was no way my abilities would allow me to play some great toccata i= n=20 the repertoire, I would go without, rather than playing a simplified version= ,=20 but I am not so quick to condemn others who would. There are lots of nuances= =20 to consider here, including in what circumstances was this arrangement playe= d.=20   =A0 All the best,=A0=A0=A0 =A0 Malcolm   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Malcolm-   Thank you for your kind and well written response! I don't mean to condemn=20 anyone either-I am one of those people that believes that practically anyone= ( who has done some study of the organ) who is willing to do the work is capab= le=20 of playing just about anything-but believe me-I klnow what its like to feel=20 overwhelmed by a work too...(just finished the Vierne Bb Minor=20 toccata-grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr) LOL   Happy Easter! gfc    
(back) Subject: Re: ethics From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 12:12:08 -0700 (PDT)   I don'r care for simplified versions either. you spen the same time = learning, and oftern the simpliified versions are more difficult than the = original correct version.     From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html   --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Tax Center - File online by April 15th  
(back) Subject: Re: Suite Gothique...entertainment value?? From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 15:20:59 EDT   In a message dated 4/11/2004 8:56:56 AM Central Standard Time, bobelms@westnet.com.au writes:   > Is there a place for the "historically-correct" (or what we perceive to = be > such) performance practice? Of course there is, but not at the expense = of > listener friendliness   Who ever said that historically correct means the listener is bored = (besides Virgil Fox)? Do they (audience) know the dif between all toes and heel = and toe, finger substitution, articulation (let's assume that we are speaking = of major Bach works)? As far as I am concerned-playing things with historic techniques and articulations makes them MUCH more exciting and sprited-as = opposed to the CONSTANT and seamless blllaahhh and honk that is associated with the Lemmens based technique-which is 100% correct for works written after = "Ecole d'Orgue" Remember-the legato technique, articulations, phrasing, and = registration practices are also historically correct!!!! It is a shame that we don't = honour the baroque technique the same way we honour the Romantic...To play everything in one style is like whitwashing musical styles and = traditions-it's musical holocaust. I will also assume that audiences are fascinated by the 32' = reed, the chamade-and flashy sounding pieces-all three have their place in "historically correct" performances. A friend of mine studied with Ulrich = Bohme at St. Thomaskirche, Leipzig-and Bohme would always yank on the 32' reed-say that = it was Bach's favorite stop-and to "use it in anything that is not too fast!!!!!" As responsible and intelligent musicians, we need to = differentiate bewteen "historically correct"-and BORING-not doing so is really an insult to the composers, and people who take the time to study and play their works in = a "historically correct" style.   Just food for thought-my 2 cents- Happy Easter- gfc    
(back) Subject: Re: ethics From: "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 14:21:57 -0500   At 01:51 PM 4/11/04, you wrote: >Is it disrespectful to the people who have worked hard to learn the works =   >in their proper form?   Not all of us are as accomplished or capable as you and others may be.....is it wrong for us to try and do the best with what we can do...I think not..the whole issue is providing music and if a simplified and edited version is what we are capable of providing a satisfactory performance, how is the disrespectful.   jch   >    
(back) Subject: Its done and He's Risen! From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 12:31:20 -0700 (PDT)   Mercy This has been one week for me. Pipechat mess...and one of my choir members gets me hot DURING Easter = Vigil. Shes that Prima Donna type that cant sing her way out of a wet = paper bag...every volunteer choir has one. Giggle But its all over, im done, and my Boellmann Cam eout great for the = postlude! So did Widor for the Prelude!     From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html   --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Tax Center - File online by April 15th  
(back) Subject: Sneering and Snobbery From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 16:45:39 EDT   Mr. Elms brings up a great point about how organ recitals 50+ years ago = were events that packed auditoriums, both civic concert halls and churches. = One thing to remember about entertainment choices back then, is that they were =   limited, and many people didn't have the luxury of going to the symphony = like we do today. Many people's only taste of orchestral music were the = transcriptions that organists played. However, as was pointed out, people heard a few "masterworks" of the organ literature, with transcriptions and some = character pieces thrown in for good measure. A balanced program, but meant for the = general public, who, for the most part, should make up the audience at a concert. =   Regarding the Suite Gothique, it's got it's moments, but it's not my = favorite work. I like the Priere and the Minuet is cute. The Toccata is ok, but = it's not my all time favorite toccata. Everytime I've played it, though, audiences seem to go crazy over the whole work. I can't judge a piece on = what other organists think because the audience loves it. What's wrong with giving = them something they like once in a while?   If all I played was a program of atonal works by contemporary Eastern European composers, most middle-America blue hair old ladies would walk = out. They are the ones writing the checks to the organ funds and supporting the = music programs/concert series at churches and colleges, what's wrong with = letting them hear something that they like? Play a transcription like the Dvorak = "Largo" or even the Bach "Arioso". Melt their little hearts, endear them to you, the =   performer, as well as the instrument. Then if you want to throw in a = Messaien piece, go for it. I'm playing a concert this summer and I'm going to = play several movements of the Joseph Clokey "Fireside Fancies." Sure it's = tacky, but it's a hit. There's nothing wrong with working the audience a little bit. It worked back in the 1920's and 1920's, and even up through the 1950's. = It wasn't until organists got "scholarly" during the organ reform movement = that we had to give up our romantic instruments and romantic literature that we =   turned people (read--audiences) off from the organ. As with everything in = life, there is a place of balance. We can go too far in either way, which is = bad, but what's wrong with having good literature along with some old favorites = and even some "trash". Crowds go wild over pieces like the D'Antalffy = "Sportive Fawns", the Powell Weaver "The Squirrel" and one of my tacky favorites, = Gordon Nevin's "Will o' the Wisp." Play some Bach and Mendelssohn, a couple of = chorale preludes, a transcription, and you've got a great program that anyone can enjoy--from a trained organist to 90 year old Miss Betty Sue who just = donated the new organ at the church.   There's no place for sneering and snobbery, because the audiences are the ones who pay us...they pay our church salaries and they pay our concert = fees. If we alienate them, where are the jobs going to be? We need to make friends =   for the organ and right now, there are too many people who think it's a = dead instrument and that organists have bad attitudes.   Need I say more????????   Monty Bennett    
(back) Subject: Flentrop (Biggs) Organ at the German Museum at Harvard From: "nycchelsea@yahoo.com" <nycchelsea@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 14:19:21 -0700 (PDT)   I've been relistening to my Bigg's CD's of the marvelous Flentrop organ at the German Museum at Harvard and was wondering if the organ is still being played, being kept up etc?   I understand it is a classical instrument voiced in the traditional fashion, along the lines of Schlicker Organs (such as at the one at Grace Church in NYC to be replaced by a Skinner type organ voiced more on Orchestral lines popular before classic organs came back into vogue in the late 50's/1960's).   Sad to see the Schlicker go at Grace, is anything being done to preserve the Flentrop at Harvard which was a gift by E. Power Biggs himself?     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Tax Center - File online by April 15th http://taxes.yahoo.com/filing.html  
(back) Subject: Re: Suite Gothique From: "Christopher Howerter" <OrgelspielerKMD@msn.com> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 19:09:42 -0400   AMEN!!!   Most Cordially, Christopher J. Howerter, SPC (who wishes there were more tolerance) <snip> If you don't agree don't listen, but don't sneer at those who wish to = play it. Easy! It is called tolerance, to sneer is snobbery.. Bob Elms =  
(back) Subject: Forthcoming Program in Milwaukee 4/18/04 From: "John Seboldt" <rohrwerk@seboldt.net> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 18:27:03 -0500     Anyone in the Milwaukee area (or beyond!) is invited to a program by myself= =20 and my wife Mary, at Our Savior's Lutheran Church, 3022 W. Wisconsin Ave.,= =20 Milwaukee, on Sunday, April 18, 2004, at 2 pm. It's announced as a ticketed= =20 event at $10 per person.   The church is sponsoring a monthly series of programs by local organists to= =20 raise money for the organ fund covering needed renovations. The instrument= =20 is a Casavant from 1964, opus 2770, about 67 ranks if I count correctly=20 from the specification. Despite some of the "crashavant" bashing of some=20 instruments from this era, there are several very fine-sounding instruments= =20 within this neo-classic mold, and this is certainly one of them. I'll post= =20 the spec here soon: www.seboldt.net/annunciation/oursavior .   The nicely-balanced Swell, Great, and Choir ensembles are supplemented by=20 an encased Ruckpositiv division, playable from the Choir manual (I).=20 Reasonable weight for Romantic (and other!) music is assured by 16' flue=20 stops on the Great and Swell, and provision of sub-octave coupling from=20 Choir and Swell.   While interesting, the Ruckpositiv tends more toward the excesses of its=20 era, with a very light gedackt foundation and a rather high-pitched Zimbel= =20 III, but can provide some contrasts in proximity and sound. Pedal=20 foundation stops are amazingly round and full, including a nice smooth 16'= =20 Principal (Contra Bass). What I find so useful is that the 16 and 8'=20 foundations can stand under a surprising range of manual combinations, from= =20 mf to f or so, without coupling. One misses 32' stops in an organ of this=20 size, but this is on the renovation wishlist (supplied electronically).=20 Additionally, the lack of vertical reeds on the Great is somewhat missed,=20 though the chamade trumpet (available on Great and Choir) is not so loud as= =20 to be totally useless in ensemble.   This organ invites a comparison with another somewhat larger Casavant of my= =20 acquaintance, from the same era, at Central Lutheran Church in Minneapolis.= =20 This one is a bit more luxuriously appointed, with real 32' stops, a full=20 reed chorus on the Great, a "Positiv" based on an 8' principal (underpinned= =20 with a 16' flue as well), and other features. On this instrument, no octave= =20 coupling at all is provided, and is usually not missed. It had a recent=20 renovation and cleaning, complemented by some discreet re-voicing. The=20 overall sound is somewhat more restrained than its Milwaukee cousin, with=20 an acoustic not quite as rich (though neither building is extremely live by= =20 any means).   Anyway, we hope to make a joyful noise in Milwaukee; we'll record it and=20 post a snip or two on the website for all to enjoy.     Our Savior's Lutheran Church 3022 W Wisconsin Ave. Milwaukee, WI Organ program by John and Mary Seboldt Sunday, April 18, 2004, 2 pm     Alleluyas Simon Preston (b. 1938) John   I Love to Tell the Story Emma Lou Diemer (b. 1927) Mary   Praeludium in G Minor, BuxWV 148 Dietrich Buxtehude (1642-1707)   Have mercy on me, Lord God, BWV 721 attr. J.S. Bach (1685-1750) John   Fantasia in G Minor, BWV 542 J.S. Bach Mary   Intermission   Symphony No. 5 in F Minor, op. 42/1 Charles-Marie Widor (1844-1937) III. Andantino quasi allegretto John   Vespers of the Common of the Blessed Virgin Mary, op. 18 Marcel Dupr=E9=20 (1886-1971) Antiphon III: I am black but comely, O ye daughters of Jerusalem Antiphon V: How fair and pleasant art thou   Concerto in G Major (after Johann Ernst), BWV 592 J.S. Bach I. [Allegro] II. Grave III. Presto Mary   Chorale Settings See the Lord of Life and Light, BWV 620 (Passiontide) J.S. Bach O Sacred Head, Now Wounded, op. 67/14 (Passiontide) Max Reger= (1873-1916) Christ Is Arisen, BWV 627 (Easter) J.S. Bach Come, Holy Ghost, Creator Blest, BWV 667 (Pentecost) J.S. Bach   Symphony I, op. 14 Louis Vierne (1870-1937) VI. Final John   Hope to see some of you there.