PipeChat Digest #4431 - Monday, April 12, 2004
 
simplifed choral greats/ was ethics
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
Praise the Lord w/Drums & Cymbals
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
Re: Praise the Lord w/Drums & Cymbals
  by "Tom Hoehn" <thoehn@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Praise the Lord w/Drums & Cymbals
  by "Tom Hoehn" <thoehn@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Historic Organ On TV
  by "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org>
Re: Flentrop (Biggs) Organ at the German Museum at Harvard
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Historic Organ on TV
  by "Keith Zimmerman" <kwzimmerman@alltel.net>
Easter Music
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
Snobbery and Fear
  by "Mike Franch" <mike6514@hotmail.com>
The Harvard Organ Society
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
this week's mp3
  by "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net>
 

(back) Subject: simplifed choral greats/ was ethics From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 22:38:11 EDT   May I be so bold as to veer this topic to another direction...   Several weeks ago, the choir I direct at my part-time Episcopal church = gig, sang a 3-part arrangement of Mendelssohn's "He Watching Over Israel". = They worked hard on it because they HAD to, but they sounded good and it = contributed wonderfully to the service.   I felt it was more a ministry to them (and to the congregation) to help = them sing this great piece, albeit in a simplified form, than to deny them a wonderful opportunity to sing good music.   Today, they sang Healey Willan's unison setting of "We Praise Thee, O = God". The sopranos have never sounded so glorious in the time I've been here... nicely unified sound, sung in tune, with vitality. The other singers sang = well too.   My thought on the subject of simplified arrangements is: as long as the "essence" of the composer's work is present, is it so wrong to present an arrangement?   The other piece of my thinking is... because the originals were so wonderfully crafted, oftentimes, arrangements end up more difficult to = play.   Neil by the rainy Bay      
(back) Subject: Praise the Lord w/Drums & Cymbals From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 21:38:54 -0500   I've been wanting to learn Karg-Elert's "Praise the Lord with Drums and Cymbals". I don't care what anyone says, its still my favorite "show off the organ to the general public" piece. Which happens to the only public = I have any interest in showing off the organ to. I figure organists already =   know the organ is cool. :) A brief search of the internet has left me scratching my head, though a little perseverence would probably get me = there eventually. But maybe someone here knows... who publishes it/how can I = get it?   Andy     By the way, for others who like to please people, Callahan's "the = rejoicing" is fun. Listen to it on the Wicks web page under recordings. Its easy. I = am working on it to play soon (on an 1860's William Nutting 1-man tracker = with only 13 pedal keys! Trust me... I know its a stretch but they'll like = it). Part of his Suite in G which can be obtained through = www.morningstarmusic.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Praise the Lord w/Drums & Cymbals From: "Tom Hoehn" <thoehn@theatreorgans.com> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 22:51:34 -0400   The Karg-Elert is published in a book of Diane Bish arrangements.   Tom Hoehn, Organist Roaring 20's Pizza & Pipes, Ellenton, FL (substitute - 4/42 Wurlitzer) First United Methodist Church, Clearwater, FL (4/9?- = Rodgers/Ruffati/Wicks) Manasota/OATOS/HiloBay/CIC-ATOS/VotS-ATOS/DTOS http://theatreorgans.com/tomhoehn ----- Original Message ----- From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, April 11, 2004 10:38 PM Subject: Praise the Lord w/Drums & Cymbals     > I've been wanting to learn Karg-Elert's "Praise the Lord with Drums and > Cymbals". I don't care what anyone says, its still my favorite "show = off > the organ to the general public" piece. Which happens to the only = public I > have any interest in showing off the organ to. I figure organists = already > know the organ is cool. :) A brief search of the internet has left me > scratching my head, though a little perseverence would probably get me there > eventually. But maybe someone here knows... who publishes it/how can I get > it? > > Andy > > > By the way, for others who like to please people, Callahan's "the rejoicing" > is fun. Listen to it on the Wicks web page under recordings. Its easy. = I am > working on it to play soon (on an 1860's William Nutting 1-man tracker with > only 13 pedal keys! Trust me... I know its a stretch but they'll like it). > Part of his Suite in G which can be obtained through www.morningstarmusic.com > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Praise the Lord w/Drums & Cymbals From: "Tom Hoehn" <thoehn@theatreorgans.com> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 22:54:42 -0400   Follow this link:   http://www.activemusician.com/store/product.asp?sku=3DHL.08738723&c=3DD941E= A26EC3447BC91CA7C38FAFE4E51&sn=3D40&nav=3Da   Tom Hoehn, Organist Roaring 20's Pizza & Pipes, Ellenton, FL (substitute - 4/42 Wurlitzer) First United Methodist Church, Clearwater, FL (4/9?- = Rodgers/Ruffati/Wicks) Manasota/OATOS/HiloBay/CIC-ATOS/VotS-ATOS/DTOS http://theatreorgans.com/tomhoehn ----- Original Message ----- From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, April 11, 2004 10:38 PM Subject: Praise the Lord w/Drums & Cymbals     > I've been wanting to learn Karg-Elert's "Praise the Lord with Drums and > Cymbals". I don't care what anyone says, its still my favorite "show = off > the organ to the general public" piece. Which happens to the only = public I > have any interest in showing off the organ to. I figure organists = already > know the organ is cool. :) A brief search of the internet has left me > scratching my head, though a little perseverence would probably get me there > eventually. But maybe someone here knows... who publishes it/how can I get > it? > > Andy > > > By the way, for others who like to please people, Callahan's "the rejoicing" > is fun. Listen to it on the Wicks web page under recordings. Its easy. = I am > working on it to play soon (on an 1860's William Nutting 1-man tracker with > only 13 pedal keys! Trust me... I know its a stretch but they'll like it). > Part of his Suite in G which can be obtained through www.morningstarmusic.com > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Historic Organ On TV From: "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 23:11:54 -0400     > > They were referring to the recently restored 1800 Tannenburg organ. = Restored > in VA. Belongs to a church in NC.   Er, sort of. It was originally installed in the Moravian Home Church of Salem, NC (now Winston-Salem) but was dismantled by them in 1910. I = believe they have a 1960 Aeolian-Skinner now.   Fortunately, they did not throw away the Tannenberg in 1910. The vast majority of the organ case and pipework were stored and rediscovered about = a decade ago. There is quite a story attached to the search for the = pipework, but ultimately, of the original 644 pipes, only 17 were missing and were easily replaced.   Historic Old Salem (not the church) decided to have the organ restored and = a new vistors center was built with an auditorium to house the instrument.   It was restored as closely as possible to the original 1800 installation = by the firm of Taylor & Boody in Staunton, VA. The organ was inaugurated in = its new home about 3 weeks with a weekend of symposia about the history of Tannenbert, the Moravians and details about the restoration of the organ. = The inaugrial recital on the organ in its new home was played by Peter Sykes. =     It is the largest surviving organ by David Tannenberg and the oldest = surviving 2 manual organ in America and is indeed beautiful, both to behold and to = hear.   More info can be found at the Taylor & Boody website:   www.taylorandboody.com/gallery/opus_40_facade.html   Cheers, TommyLee Whitlock Reston, VA    
(back) Subject: Re: Flentrop (Biggs) Organ at the German Museum at Harvard From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 23:43:57 -0400   Dear Anonymous - and List,   The Flentrop in Busch Hall, earlier known as the Busch-Reisinger Germanic Museum, is well used and well appreciated. Not having heard this Organ for over 30 years, having spent much of that time out of the country, I = finally had a reunion with it a couple of years ago, in one of the weekly = recitals, played this time by Michael Murray, Organist/Choirmaster at Church of the Redeemer, Brookline. The recital was wonderful, the small hall was well filled, and the Organ was as thrilling as I had remembered it all those years ago.   Here is the URL for the Harvard Organ Society, including a listing of recitals in Busch Hall.   As for Grace Church, New York, I am afraid I could not more disagree with your feelings about this. In the sort of general sweeping away of the = great Skinners, of which the Grace Church Organ was a magnificent example, the church was persuaded to buy one of the least successful of all the instruments by Hermann Schlicker. I am told that remnants of the old Organ are playing and much loved somewhere in The South. As a Juilliard student = in the early 60s, I went along to a recital by Power Biggs when the Schlicker was quite new. This was the kind of instrument, judging from the stoplist, that we were supposed to love. With its little baby scales, neither the front Organ nor the back had the slightest impact on us, sitting about 10 rows from the front. Back then, we did not fully realize the nature of the mistake that was made. It is now well understood by the church, and they have been trying to find a way to once again have a beautiful and amply scaled instrument, capable of playing a wide range of repertoire while comfortably accompanying the Anglican service.   Cheers from the NOT anonymous   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com     ----- Original Message ----- From: <nycchelsea@yahoo.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, April 11, 2004 5:19 PM Subject: Flentrop (Biggs) Organ at the German Museum at Harvard     > I've been relistening to my Bigg's CD's of the > marvelous Flentrop organ at the German Museum at > Harvard and was wondering if the organ is still being > played, being kept up etc? > > I understand it is a classical instrument voiced in > the traditional fashion, along the lines of Schlicker > Organs (such as at the one at Grace Church in NYC to > be replaced by a Skinner type organ voiced more on > Orchestral lines popular before classic organs came > back into vogue in the late 50's/1960's). > > Sad to see the Schlicker go at Grace, is anything > being done to preserve the Flentrop at Harvard which > was a gift by E. Power Biggs himself? >      
(back) Subject: Historic Organ on TV From: "Keith Zimmerman" <kwzimmerman@alltel.net> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 23:48:01 -0500   Tom said, "They were referring to the recently restored 1800 Tannenburg organ. Restored in VA. Belongs to a church in NC."   bgsx52@sympatico.ca gave the link: http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2004/04/09/sunday/main611248.shtml   Thanks guys. My mother-in-law mentioned the Moravians. I mentioned the name "Tannenburg" to her, but she said that that didn't sound right. From what I've read, Tannenburg built for the Moravians. She did mention the thing about some Boy Scouts stepping on some pipes years ago thereby flattening them. Anyway, it's nice to be correct at the in-laws' from = time to time.   Thanks for the help, Keith      
(back) Subject: Easter Music From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Mon, 12 Apr 2004 00:03:18 EDT   Prelude - Chorale in E Major - Joseph Jongen   Offertory - Improvisation on "Llanfair" - Robert Groves   Postlude - Festal Flourish - Gordon Jacob   Used the Trombone (from the midi), dropped it two octaves ,which makes a terrific 32' Bombarde, and our area Rodgers rep recently set up a dandy = Festival Trumpet on the Swell manual for me, a wonderful "en Chamade" or State = Trumpet fanfare reed. Thank you again, Steve (Wittman, Greater Kansas City = area)!!   Dale G. Rider Northern Blvd. United Methodist Church Independence, Missouri Rodgers 805 w/ PR300S    
(back) Subject: Snobbery and Fear From: "Mike Franch" <mike6514@hotmail.com> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 23:08:17 -0500   In my opinion, snobbery is a symptom of fear. Most musicians - artists, = for that matter, are very sensitive people. We are easily hurt by others words =   or lack of.   Many artists strive for perfection, some lose their mind over it, due to either being a better critic than performer, or strive for better-than-perfection. Some see perfection as a means to an end. The balanced individual (most of us) can see the human side of striving for perfection. That is, we're always striving for it, but never really get there. (I know. Some of you are saying "Speak for yourself"). I say to = you, look further inward.   The reason I say this? I consider myself a snob. Why? Because when I play = my music for people and put in my emotional all, and I get less than a heartwarming, genuine emotional thanks, I feel that this or that person = has no appreciation for my art, which is why they hated my playing. Those substandard non-musical uneducated subhumans! Aha! SNOB!   I took paino lessons for many years. My parents treated me as a trophy = piece for their dinner parties. I was expected to play whenever they had guests over. I can remember as a young child, when I played for my relatives, = they would laugh at me. Or so I thought. They were not laughing at me, but laughing at the fact that this young kid (5 years old) could play like = that. I was so hurt, I would go up to my room and cry. I don't feel traumatized = by it in the way of dysfunctional, but I shied away from my talent as I = started to create a shield around my inner being from this insensitive way of telling me I had talent. Why couldn't they have just humbly said, "Mike, = you are a very talented musician. I'll bet your parents are very proud of = you." My adult reason tells me that the human being won't always tell you what = you wnat to hear. That's just human nature. But, the walls were already built.   I won trophies in elementary school going to McCormick Place in Chicago = and competing at piano competitions. My piano teacher said I had talent and could be a 'star'. I was always the last or next to last to play in his recitals. (We were put in order from worst to best). I declined to pursue = my love of music, because I equate my playing with a very inner emotion that I'm trying to convey to people. When someone doesn't like what I play, that's like saying that they hate every fiber of who I am. I just can't do =   it! Getting rejected from a job or a girl I liked was MUCH more palatable than someone saying they didn't like what I played or a feeling of indifference to my music. And I turn the SNOB knob on to protect myself = from the hurt that I would feel because of it. I can play with a lot of = emotion. Now, I do it alone. I still play in church but only one Saturday a month = at prayer services, minimal playing, only because I love the organ. But to = put my life into it - just can't go there. The rejection would go into the = very fiber of who I am. There would be nothing left to reject. That's all of = it. Period!   So I sell instead. Newspaper advertising. Still get rejected. But, I'm secure in knowing that they rejected my attempt at selling them an ad. The =   SNOB knob still kicks in when they say 'no' only because I say to myself "Hah! They don't know my secret talent! And they never will!"   Now, if I get critiqued at my playing, I can use the excuse that I don't practice enough and didn't get a college education at it, and don't do it professionally anyway.   So, I think snobbery is a very inner place that people go to protect themselves for what they wish to hear, but don't.   Mike Franch Madison, WI   _________________________________________________________________ Watch LIVE baseball games on your computer with MLB.TV, included with MSN Premium! http://join.msn.com/?page=3Dfeatures/mlb&pgmarket=3Den-us/go/onm00200439ave= /direct/01/    
(back) Subject: The Harvard Organ Society From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 12 Apr 2004 00:20:17 -0400   Dear List,   In responding to Anonymous in Chelsea a while ago, I had intended to give the URL for the Harvard Organ Society. It is:   http://hcs.harvard.edu/~organ/recitals.php3   It includes a listing of upcoming recitals in Busch Hall on the Flentrop.   Cheers,   Malcolm      
(back) Subject: this week's mp3 From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 22:27:06 -0700   Hello folks,   This week's mp3 is my own recording of the Mouvement by Jean Berveiller   http://www.blackiris.com/orwig/mouv.mp3   I hope to resume the Richard White series soon - I've begun preliminary = work on his Fantasy and fugue in F minor - now that the pressures of easter are = past, I expect to=20 have more time to work on my projects   Best,   Jonathan