PipeChat Digest #4435 - Tuesday, April 13, 2004
 
Re: Organists pay about to EXPLODE UPWARD!!!
  by "Dick Meckstroth" <support@opensystemsorgans.com>
Handel's Messiah
  by "Rick" <iplayorgan@comcast.net>
AGO
  by "Rick" <iplayorgan@comcast.net>
Re: Newspaper Article About Home Organ
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: one more mp3....
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
RE: ethics
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
RE: Organists pay about to EXPLODE UPWARD!!!
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
RE: Suite Gothique...entertainment value??
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
Christopher Nash
  by "Mark W. McClellan" <omicron@prairieinet.net>
Re: Christopher Nash
  by "Mark W. McClellan" <omicron@prairieinet.net>
Re: Organists pay about to EXPLODE UPWARD!!!
  by "Nelson Denton" <ndenton@cogeco.ca>
Re: one more mp3....
  by "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net>
Easter Widor
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
Re: Handel's Messiah
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Looking for Easter Tide introits
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
Re: Easter Widor
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Organists pay about to EXPLODE UPWARD!!!
  by "bgsx" <bgsx52@sympatico.ca>
Re: Handel's Messiah (Sources for 1st performance @ Chester)
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Discovery of 18th century music
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Tannenberg Restoration -- The Book
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
Re: Christopher Nash
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: Article About Home Organ - Thanks
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Discovery of 18th century music
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Herman Schlicker at Grace Church??  Why?
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Article About Home Organ - Thanks
  by <Cpmnhartus@aol.com>
Re: Discovery of 18th century music
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Organists pay about to EXPLODE UPWARD!!! From: "Dick Meckstroth" <support@opensystemsorgans.com> Date: Tue, 13 Apr 2004 07:11:50 -0400   > a new industry of note counters will pop up   .... and be outsourced to Bangalore.   Dick  
(back) Subject: Handel's Messiah From: "Rick" <iplayorgan@comcast.net> Date: Tue, 13 Apr 2004 09:17:34 -0500   On this date in history:   1742 -- George Frideric Handel's oratorio Messiah is first performed, in Dublin.   Hallelujah! Rick      
(back) Subject: AGO From: "Rick" <iplayorgan@comcast.net> Date: Tue, 13 Apr 2004 09:20:19 -0500   Also on this date in history:   1896 -- The American Guild of Organists is founded in New York City.   Happy 108th anniversary! Rick    
(back) Subject: Re: Newspaper Article About Home Organ From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 13 Apr 2004 11:38:56 -0400   On 4/12/04 10:18 PM, "Devon3000@aol.com" <Devon3000@aol.com> wrote:   > You only have twelve days to find this article without doing an advanced > search: > Thoroughly enjoyed it! Kudos!   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: one more mp3.... From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 13 Apr 2004 11:42:17 -0400   On 4/12/04 11:41 PM, "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> wrote:   > And a prize goes to the first person to identify the tune   Well, Rudolf, it=B9s certainly SEASONAL enough. Just not THIS season!   Alan    
(back) Subject: RE: ethics From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Tue, 13 Apr 2004 11:36:35 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve     T.Desiree' Hines wrote:   > I don'r care for simplified versions either. you spen the same time learning, and oftern the simpliified versions are more difficult than the original correct version.   AMEN!- going a little further, we find the (in-)famous orchestra to piano reductions and "resolved" Bassos Continuos. Franz Liszt himself would quit playing most of the stuff! "An arranger must have more knowledge and = insight than a composer", my Jazz arangement instructor said...   Yours Andres =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.    
(back) Subject: RE: Organists pay about to EXPLODE UPWARD!!! From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Tue, 13 Apr 2004 11:37:08 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   Hee heee... Play Widor's 5th and Viernes 6th a buck per note a couple of times and RETIRE to... (fill in: Bahamas, Hawaii, Cote d'azur, Copacabana...) <G>   Couldn't resist to kid a little, but the whole affair is a sad symptom of our "get easy & fast rewards" time, IMHO.   Andres =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.            
(back) Subject: RE: Suite Gothique...entertainment value?? From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Tue, 13 Apr 2004 11:49:34 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   Folks, I sweared to myself to never ring in such threads again, but...   1) Historically correct interpretation- whuzzat? In my relatively short career I had to learn two "historically correct" ways to play Ancient Masters; when the third one came up I quitted for good, and right now I = was told about a completely new historically correct way based on latest knowledges... when will it be realized at broad level that with 1+ millenium's culture heritage in the background we never will be able to = play exactly like the old masters played 300 or 400 years ago? To the other side, it's all but historically correct to play Cesar = Franck's "Piece Heroique" or L. Boellman's "Suite Gothique" on a neobaroque Kleuker (look, Ma- no vox celeste, reeds, swellbox or registration aids!). Nevertheless we managed to do it out of necessity, and the audience was thrilled.   2) What's wrong with Boellman's "Suite Gothique?"- it's part of our = academic organ program because we consider it an easy introduction to french romantics. It has all the characteristic elements without the fiendish technical difficulties that characterize other works. The student can concentrate on expression and registration techniques without having to worry about too many difficulties. What's in a name? "Gothique" was a la mode in that time. We have some Cavaille-Coll organs with "gotic" facades and behind high romantic stops instead of a Blockwerk. The same happens with L. Boellmann's little opus, whose only "gothic" elements are the title- and a very decent modal harmony.   3) About so-called "junk"- organ Works: they must be played with most careful understanding, love and enthusiasm precisely because the performing = organist must put in all the artistry the composer didn't for whatever reasons. Otherwise they will become "empty noise" indeed. It would be a mistake to convert such works into the "strong point" of a recital. But my organ instructor said that such works are good fill-ins for recitals: "Play = three or four 'heavy' works and between relax the audience and yourself with easier stuff- *well* played, it is!".   3) Academic vs entertainment: A good recital should have both and be instructive and entertaining. Then, it won't be boring. Once again *the* = old theme from me: We 21th cty ladies and gentlemen have an unique opportunity to deal with 1000 years culture heritage. Recent investigations brought us back lots of lost knowledge and material. Let's take advantage of it! Bringing together "food for the spirit" and "crowd pleasers" in a recital *is* possible with imagination, good taste, and keeping in mind that people come first after all. Such a recital can become a fascinating trip through organ history, more in US-America with so many wonderful eclectic organs. As for academics etc I expressed my opinion three weeks ago in other list and won't bother you again with another AGEP.   ....Still mildly amazed how a harmless question about an Easter Postlude suggestion could develop into such a destructive fuss, I wish you all a blessed, happy and soul-raising Easter Time. (PS: I would have suggested an arrangement of Haendel's "Aleluia Chorus" = for organ solo, but hadn't time to open my mail in these days).   Yours Andres =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.    
(back) Subject: Christopher Nash From: "Mark W. McClellan" <omicron@prairieinet.net> Date: Tue, 13 Apr 2004 11:28:12 -0500   Dear Organists, First of all, thank you for alerting me about the unfortunate exchange that took place over the internet last Wednesday evening between our organist, Christopher Nash, and other members of the www.pipechat.org chat room participants. I was embarrassed both for Christopher and for our = church and want you to know that I am very sorry that we were represented in such = a poor light because of his actions. I have discussed this with Christopher, who has assured me that he has called Ms. Hines and personally apologized to her for his mean-spirited comments. He has also sought our forgiveness and has asked me to extend = his sincere apologies to you on his behalf. While I am not at liberty to discuss with you the circumstances surrounding such behavior, I can offer you the pledge that it will not happen again. I appreciate the kind way that all of you have handled this matter and the gracious words that you have extended to us about our = church and your concerns for its reputation. Aiken's First Baptist Church truly = is a wonderful place in which to work and minister. It is also a place that recognizes that we are all human; that we all make mistakes; and that grace-filled forgiveness is always an opportunity for redemption and = growth. Needless to say, this past Sunday, of all Sundays, was our way, as Christians, to celebrate what unconditional love really means! I wish for all of you the very best as you continue in your ministries and I hope that you will be able to forgive Christopher (as we have) for = his foolish and hurtful behavior.   Sincerely, James Bennett     James E. Bennett, Jr. 803.648.5476 (Church) 803.215.2637 (Cell) 803.648.4453 (Fax)    
(back) Subject: Re: Christopher Nash From: "Mark W. McClellan" <omicron@prairieinet.net> Date: Tue, 13 Apr 2004 11:32:41 -0500     James Bennett is the Minister of Music at First Baptist Church in Aiken, = SC. Evidently the server took off the letter head. It was in my mailbox but = was meant for the entire list.   Mark McClellan >    
(back) Subject: Re: Organists pay about to EXPLODE UPWARD!!! From: "Nelson Denton" <ndenton@cogeco.ca> Date: Mon, 12 Apr 2004 23:23:26 -0400   Great Idea!!! However how much do they deduct for wrong notes played???   There has to be a catch.  
(back) Subject: Re: one more mp3.... From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> Date: Tue, 13 Apr 2004 09:45:05 -0700   Re: one more mp3....<chuckle>   coming to a worship center near you in about, oh...8 months or so....   -J ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Alan Freed=20 To: PipeChat=20 Sent: Tuesday, April 13, 2004 8:42 AM Subject: Re: one more mp3....=20     On 4/12/04 11:41 PM, "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> wrote:     And a prize goes to the first person to identify the tune     Well, Rudolf, it's certainly SEASONAL enough. Just not THIS season!   Alan  
(back) Subject: Easter Widor From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Tue, 13 Apr 2004 12:53:37 EDT   Friends: Yes, I played the Widor for the prelude for both services on = Sunday at All Saints Episcopal, Lakewood, NJ. The little unified Reuter did = well, despite its propensity to have empty notes here and there. And yes, I = played it in 6 minutes flat, generally regarded as TOO fast among us. However...   I thought I would share what a parishioner wrote my rector via -email.   "I enjoyed the music, and was especially set up by that Widor Toccata, = which I thought was executed at exactly the right speed, instead of like an = imminent train wreck, the way one usually hears it.   It was nice for a change to have a relatively stress-free holy week...and = it was pleasant to "enjoy" the week and Easter rather than dread it.   Peace to you all.   Neil by the extremely rainy Bay    
(back) Subject: Re: Handel's Messiah From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 13 Apr 2004 10:02:45 -0700 (PDT)   Eeeeerm!   Not QUITE true I'm afraid!   Handel's Messiah was actually FIRST performed in Chester Cathedral here in England, as the crew were on their way to Dublin.   I THINK it was a sort of rehearsal for the Dublin event, but as the cathedral was open for business and the choir and band performed it live, it kind of qualifies as a first performance in public.   I'm being terribly pedantic of course, and let's face it, the details of the first performance are fairly irrelevant!   Not a bad piece of music, on the whole!!!!!!!!!!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- Rick <iplayorgan@comcast.net> wrote: > > 1742 -- George Frideric Handel's oratorio Messiah is > first performed, in > Dublin.       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Small Business $15K Web Design Giveaway http://promotions.yahoo.com/design_giveaway/  
(back) Subject: Re: Looking for Easter Tide introits From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Tue, 13 Apr 2004 13:03:39 -0400   Christ the Lord is Risen Today David H. Williams H. W. Gray / Belwin  
(back) Subject: Re: Easter Widor From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 13 Apr 2004 10:06:09 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Oh dear!   5m 20secs.......I guess I did the train wreck!   Tracker action, and fingers like racing snakes.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Innkawgneeto@cs.com wrote:   And yes, I played > it in 6 minutes flat, generally regarded as TOO fast > among us.     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Small Business $15K Web Design Giveaway http://promotions.yahoo.com/design_giveaway/  
(back) Subject: Re: Organists pay about to EXPLODE UPWARD!!! From: "bgsx" <bgsx52@sympatico.ca> Date: Tue, 13 Apr 2004 14:57:02 -0400     >> a new industry of note counters will pop up > > ... and be outsourced to Bangalore.   "Every two weeks, when Lucas plays a piano at Acadia University, a short drive from his home, his teacher, Marc Durand, sits listening 700 miles away at a second shiny black grand piano at the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto. With a built-in computer and tiny solenoid pistons, the piano springs to life there as though being played by a ghost imitating every keystroke and pedal movement that Lucas makes"   http://www.monitor.ca/monitor/issues/vol11iss8/bytebeat.html#5138   http://www.newswire.ca/en/releases/archive/February2004/25/c3973.html   http://www.acadiau.ca/whatsnew/newsrelease/2003/music_educ_20may03.html    
(back) Subject: Re: Handel's Messiah (Sources for 1st performance @ Chester) From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 13 Apr 2004 13:55:19 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   One member contacted me re: the first performance of "Messiah" at Chester.   The following may be of general interest to the list.   Actually, the information came from Roger Fisher, a former organist and master of choristers at Chester Cathedral.   Chester is (and was then), a suitable staging post for the journey to Dublin, with the boat sailing from Holyhead in Wales across to Dublin. I guess it would have been a two or three day journey across to Ireland and, of course, they would have travelled by coach and horses from London or wherever in the 18th century. Chester was then an important "staging post" for regular scheduled stage-coach journeys to the North of England.   The joys of being a travelling musician!   Interestingly, Handel also used to visit Adlington Hall in Cheshire (not far from Chester) where he played the organ in the great hall; since restored to original condition with short compass bottom octave.   This must be the only organ in the world which was secured to two huge oak trees, which were simply cut to shape where they grew!     www.adlingtonhall.com/     THE FOLLOWING IS TAKEN from a BBC website:-   On his way over to Ireland he was delayed at Chester because the winds were wrong for crossing the Irish Sea, so he used the time by rehearsing Messiah with some singers from Chester Cathedral, but the results were not good. On one occasion, having asked the cathedral organist to recommend any choristers who could sing at sight, Handel auditioned a printer named Janson, who was supposed to have a good bass voice. Janson, however, was useless. Handel in fury said, 'You scoundrel, didn't you tell me that you could sing at sight?' to which the hapless printer replied, 'Yes, Sir, and so I can, but not at first sight!'   On arrival in Dublin, Handel initially ran into a storm of protest from the church authorities. His plan was to give his new oratorio its first performance at the New Musick Theatre in Fishamble Street5. But the Dean of St Patrick's Cathedral, Dr Jonathan Swift (author of Gulliver's Travels), initially came out against him, writing as follows:   .... whereas it hath been reported that I gave a licence to certain vicars to assist at a club of fiddlers in Fishamble Street, I do hereby annul and vacate the said licence, intreating my said Sub-Dean and chapter to punish such vicars as shall ever appear there, as songsters, fiddlers, pipers, trumpeters, drummers, drum-majors, or in any sonal quality, according to the flagitious aggravations of their respective disobedience, rebellion, perfidy and ingratitude. Swift must have relented, however, because the performance did take place, on 13 April, 1742, with 26 boys and five men from the cathedral choirs participating. It was a great success, and the fact that it raised money for several charities (a debtors' prison, a hospital, and so on) helped to bolster Handel's reputation in Ireland. He remained in Ireland for eight or nine months, and that sojourn was a great help to him in building up his bank balance, which had become severely depleted because of problems in London.     AND THE FOLLOWING IS OF INTEREST:-     http://www.manchester2002-uk.com/daytrips/out/chester.html       It was in Chester Cathedral that the first ever performance was made of Handel's "Messiah". Copies of Handle's original manuscript are on view in the cathedral.   AND ALSO THE FOLLOWING:-     [Charles Burney tells a story about the preparation at Chester Cathedral for the first performance of Messiah in Dublin.] During this time, he [Handel] applied to Mr. Baker, the Organist, my first music master, to know whether there were any choirmen in the cathedral who could sing at sight, as he wished to prove some books that had been hastily transcribed, by trying the choruses which he intended to perform in Ireland. Mr. Baker mentioned some of the most likely singers then in Chester, and, among the rest, a printer the name of Janson, who had a good bass voice and was one of the best musicians in the choir... A time was fixed for this private rehearsal at the Golden Falcon, where Handel was quartered; but, alas! on trial of the chorus in the Messiah, 'And with his stripes we are healed,' poor Janson, after repeated attempts, failed so egregiously, that Handel let loose his great bear upon him; and after swearing in four or five languages, cried out in broken English, Handel : "You shcauntrel [scoundrel]! tit not you dell me dat you could sing at soite [sight]?" Janson : "Yes, sir, and so I can, but not at first sight." (Charles Burney, An Account of the Musical Performances...in Commemoration of Handel, 1785)   -o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-oo     So there seems to be the conclusive evidence that "Messiah" was first heard in Chester Cathedral!   Regards,     Colin Mitchell UK             __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Tax Center - File online by April 15th http://taxes.yahoo.com/filing.html  
(back) Subject: Discovery of 18th century music From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 13 Apr 2004 13:59:06 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   A friend of mine has been investigating the work of William Herchel, the 18th century astronomer.   In his searches, he has come across voluntaries for organ which are held, I think, in Edinburgh.   They have specific registration markings which suggest that they were written during the period that Herschel was organist at Halifax Parish Church here in the UK.   Herschel was, of course, the astronomer who discovered the planet Uranus.   More later!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Tax Center - File online by April 15th http://taxes.yahoo.com/filing.html  
(back) Subject: Tannenberg Restoration -- The Book From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Tue, 13 Apr 2004 17:59:43 -0400   A splendid new and well illustrated book on the restoration of David Tannenberg's organ built for Home Moravian Church in Salem, North Carolina (the subject of TV coverage last weekend), is now available from OHS for only $10 at http://www.ohscatalog.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Christopher Nash From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 13 Apr 2004 15:34:34 -0700 (PDT)   Well he has not called me. but hes being "served" .   Thanks for being there, all of you. One thing I have been assured of is = that The pipechat gang is truly the real crowd for me Lovingly D     From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Tax Center - File online by April 15th  
(back) Subject: Re: Article About Home Organ - Thanks From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Tue, 13 Apr 2004 18:35:36 EDT   Michael and Maggy sent me a PDF of the article -- and several others told = me privately that my AOL address and my iMac computer show that I will never progress beyond a tubular-pneumatic internet connection...   SMG   ..  
(back) Subject: Re: Discovery of 18th century music From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 13 Apr 2004 18:49:32 -0400   On 4/13/04 4:59 PM, "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:   > [Herschel] the astronomer who discovered the planet Uranus. > > More later!   There'd better be! I was just getting warmed up to the subject!   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Herman Schlicker at Grace Church?? Why? From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 13 Apr 2004 19:39:30 -0400   On 4/11/04 11:43 PM, "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> wrote:   > [Grace Church] was persuaded to buy one of the least successful of all = the > instruments by Hermann Schlicker.   What I cannot figure out is HOW were they so persuaded? What on EARTH = could have been the attraction? Was it the titulaire? I happen to LIKE = Herman's horns. But for Grace Church? Please! Just a horrible mismatch! Is = there even a "maybe" answer to that?   > I am told that remnants of the old Organ are playing and much loved = somewhere > in The South. As a Juilliard student in the early 60s, I went along to a > recital by Power Biggs when the Schlicker was quite new. This was the = kind of > instrument, judging from the stoplist, that we were supposed to love. = With its > little baby scales, neither the front Organ nor the back had the = slightest > impact on us, sitting about 10 rows from the front. Back then, we did = not > fully realize the nature of the mistake that was made. It is now well > understood by the church, and they have been trying to find a way to = once > again have a beautiful and amply scaled instrument, capable of playing a = wide > range of repertoire while comfortably accompanying the Anglican service.   I certainly appreciate the historical background, but my big question (above) remains to perplex me.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Article About Home Organ - Thanks From: <Cpmnhartus@aol.com> Date: Tue, 13 Apr 2004 20:30:27 EDT   Some of you may think that Sebastian had a "tubular pneumatic Internet connection" ( I have one, as well), but tubular pneumatic is not = necessarily slow. The wonderful three decker T. C. Lewis organ of 1901 in Glasgow's = Kelvingrove Art Museum has the fastest action I have ever played. It was restored in = 1988 by Manders.   This is a wonderful organ that remains in its unaltered state and has been =   used for weekly organ recitals. It is silent for the moment because the = museum is closed for a complete restoration which should be finished by mid 2006. =   Glasgow is a wonderfully exciting city and real arts mecca, well worth a = special visit.   After Glasgow, go to Edinburgh and hear the magnificent Willis at St. = Mary's Episcopal Cathedral where Simon Nieminsky is the assistant organist. That organ has the most beautiful Corno di Bassetto I have ever heard and = played.   So, Sebastian, I belong to your club. You have company.   George   George W. Bayley Senior U. S. Consultant Copeman Hart America Lewes, Delaware    
(back) Subject: Re: Discovery of 18th century music From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Tue, 13 Apr 2004 19:43:02 -0500     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, April 13, 2004 3:59 PM Subject: Discovery of 18th century music     > Hello, > > A friend of mine has been investigating the work of > William Herchel, the 18th century astronomer. > > In his searches, he has come across voluntaries for > organ which are held, I think, in Edinburgh. > > They have specific registration markings which suggest > that they were written during the period that Herschel > was organist at Halifax Parish Church here in the UK. > > Herschel was, of course, the astronomer who discovered > the planet Uranus.   The discovery of Uranus (which Herschel originally named Georgius Sidus in honor of King George III) took place, of course, after he left Halifax, = when he was organist of the Octagon Chapel in Bath. He later gave up being a professional organist when he was appointed the Astronomer Royal. His sister Caroline was also a famous musician and astronomer, who discovered = a comet.   Some of Herschel's compositions for organ have been published (there is = one, I recall in one of E. Power Biggs's anthologies), so it would be = interesting to know if the Edinburgh voluntaries are previously unknown. At the least there should be a nice Ph.D. dissertation in it for someone.   John Speller