PipeChat Digest #4442 - Monday, April 19, 2004
 
Re: What's an organ doing in a Greek Orthodox Church?
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk>
Haskelling
  by "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh@ns.sympatico.ca>
Re: Haskelling
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: Haskelling
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re: Haskelling
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: What's an organ doing in a Greek Orthodox Church?
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
Felix Hell. Graduation recital at Curtis
  by "Hans-Friedrich Hell" <hell-concerts@t-online.de>
Estey Drawings - Cross-posted
  by "Phil Stimmel" <pca@sover.net>
RE: Haskelling
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
Music of Samuel Walter
  by "Robert Eversman" <highnote@mhtc.net>
Carlo on Wanamaker Organ NEXT Saturday
  by "Robert Ridgeway" <robert@magneticlab.com>
It played in Peoria
  by "black" <gblack@ocslink.com>
It played in Peoria
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
Re: It played in Peoria
  by "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com>
PIPE ORGAN ON EBAY - the fallout continues to fall [x-posted]
  by "Charlie Lester" <crlester@137.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: What's an organ doing in a Greek Orthodox Church? From: "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 18 Apr 2004 11:14:33 +0100 (BST)   I get invited to quite a lot of weddings here in Greece. Photography seems almost to have taken over from the Priesthood as the main reason for the service, so you would do fine today, Bob! (Bob Conway wrote : they did not permit photographers into the church!) Although most of the Churches in our town are rather plain on the outside, inside they are superbly decorated with iconographic art, a highly specialised form which flourishes here. If you want to see an example and you have a moment to spare, go to my home page www.johnfoss.gr click on Mount Olympus which will take you to the Official Pieria Website (English version) and then click on Cultural Themes. Look at "The "Karapiperios School" of Byzantine Iconography" to see an example - though to appreciate the splendours you really need to go inside our Cathedral, or some of the other Parish Churches, to see Buildings completely decorated inside with this type of art. It is magnificent, and the acoustics are usually highly resonant: domes and cupolas, no carpets, but sound reflecting walls. Unaccompanied Byzantine Chant is the rule - professional choirs in some churches. No organs! Yes - there are three repetitions of many aspects of the service. You can find a good description of a Greek wedding at http://www.greecetravel.com/weddings/service.html Aspects of the service derive from pre Christian times - details of these can be found at the Classics site of Jennifer Powers of State University of New York http://ablemedia.com/ctcweb/consortium/ancientweddings3.html Weddings are important occasions here - this is not to say that they are not elsewhere, but family life in Greece, where 95% of the population are members of the Greek Orthodox Church, tends to be closer to the Church than in England and I guess the US: certainly, divorce seems to be less common. Children and education are highly valued, in general. If anyone is planning a visit to Greece for the Olympic Games - and over 75% of the tickets have already been sold - it's worth paying a visit to our part of the world: Salonika and the rest of Macedonia and Pieria, home of Alexander the Great and the Gods of Olympus! All of Greece is steeped in history - we can even claim to have invented the organ here. You can see the remains of the world's very first pipe organ in the Museum at nearby Dion - 10 minutes from my house - it can be seen in the Pieria site mentioned above - Click on a)History Archaeology then Ancient Dion followed by The Museum - First Floor for a photograph. The site gives a good idea of the rich and varied cultural life we have here - just in case anyone makes it, I am giving a piano recital on May 22nd - Bach, Haydn, Beethoven, Mendelssohn and Schumann. This is my debut as a pianist. It will be in the "Aithousa Mousikis kai Teknis" (Hall of Music and Art) at the Pieria School of Music. Concert Grand piano by Kawai. John Foss   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D www.johnfoss.gr http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/ Topics of the week : Easter Bunny crucified in Pennsylvania What has become of Saddam Hussein? Check your money ... predictions on US$ ignored?     ____________________________________________________________ Yahoo! Messenger - Communicate instantly..."Ping" your friends today! Download Messenger Now http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/download/index.html  
(back) Subject: Haskelling From: "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh@ns.sympatico.ca> Date: Sun, 18 Apr 2004 09:38:30 -0300   Seems to me a while back the subject of haskeling came up. I was gonna try an experiment with a pipe I have of haskeling it Question is How do I do it??? Any knowlegable help appreciated Danielwh    
(back) Subject: Re: Haskelling From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Sun, 18 Apr 2004 08:51:11 EDT   In a message dated 4/18/2004 8:39:17 AM Eastern Daylight Time, danielwh@ns.sympatico.ca writes: Seems to me a while back the subject of haskeling came up. I was gonna try an experiment with a pipe I have of haskeling it Question is How do I do it??? Any knowlegable help appreciated hopefully you are dealing with a round pipe, as this will make = construction and calculating the inner tube easier. basically you need to measure the = inside diameter of the 'prime' pipe, and then calculate the necessary diameter of =   the 'insert' tube (closed on one end) so that the insert is .707 of the = area of the prime pipe, and then the length of the tube will determine the pitch = drop up to about 4/5th the length of the prime pipe. this obviously will be = easier to do on a longer pipe, and haskelled pipes that I have seen (mostly but = not always in Estey organs) rarely extended beyond the 4' C pitched pipe (i.e. =   tenor C of an 8' rank). Using the haskell tube will affect the timbre of = the prime pipe. You will also need to fashion some sort of support collar to hold suspend = the tube in the center of the prime pipe. Estey, and most other makers used a collar that was fitted to the outside of the pipe with a spiral (diagonal) = cut on part of the collar which sits against a bead of solder on the pipe body to =   allow for tuning. raising the tube into and out of the prime pipe is the = method of sharpening/flattening the pitch. FWIW, you could use a cardboard tube of the right diameter just to play around with with, just as long as the diameter and length are correct, tho = making a tube out of metal matching the prime pipe would obviously give the best results. Rick in VA    
(back) Subject: Re: Haskelling From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 18 Apr 2004 08:56:39 -0400   Hi Daniel, I suggest looking at the following link in Ed Stauff's "Encyclopedia of organ Stops" as a good starting point. There are some drawings of the different methods used, and an excellent explanation of the theory behind it. Let us know how you make out. Cheers Mike http://www.organstops.org/_apps/HaskellBasses.html   Daniel Hopkins wrote:   > Seems to me a while back the subject of haskeling came up. > I was gonna try an experiment with a pipe I have of haskeling it > Question is > How do I do it??? > Any knowlegable help appreciated > Danielwh > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Haskelling From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Sun, 18 Apr 2004 08:08:36 -0500   At 9:38 AM -0300 04/18/04, Daniel Hopkins wrote: >Seems to me a while back the subject of haskeling came up. > I was gonna try an experiment with a pipe I have of haskeling it > Question is > How do I do it??? > Any knowlegable help appreciated   Daniel   There are very specific measurements that must be followed in order that the haskelled pipe will work correctly. I don't have the specifics available right now but if you do a search at the US Patent Office you can get a copy of the original patent with has all of those measurements detailed.   Basically there is a very specific relationship between the diameter of the pipe and the diameter of the haskell tube along with how far above the end of the pipe that the tube must rise.   Sorry i can't give you all of the specifics but you can find them in the original patent.   David  
(back) Subject: Re: What's an organ doing in a Greek Orthodox Church? From: <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Sun, 18 Apr 2004 11:03:02 EDT   I play for weddings in a Greek Orthodox Church in Southampton, NY - and I have to bring my keyboards and amp. As far as I know, weddings are the = only time an "organ" is used.   And as Mr. Foss said, the acoustics are splendid. I have to set my amp volume low as I don't want to lift the dome. :-)   Victoria    
(back) Subject: Felix Hell. Graduation recital at Curtis From: "Hans-Friedrich Hell" <hell-concerts@t-online.de> Date: Sun, 18 Apr 2004 18:46:22 +0200   Dear listmembers and friends,   this is to announce Felix's senior recital at Curtis.   Location: The Curtis Institute of Music Field Concert Hall 1726 Locust Street Philadelphia, PA 19102   Date/Time: 04/29/04, 8 pm   Reception to follow   If you are in the area, Felix would feel honored if you would attend at this event, which will mark an important milestone of his career.   Hans-Friedrich Hell    
(back) Subject: Estey Drawings - Cross-posted From: "Phil Stimmel" <pca@sover.net> Date: Sun, 18 Apr 2004 13:21:08 -0400   I have recently come into the possession of over 600 architect's line = drawings of the facades of Estey pipe organs. These are the original drawings made in preparation for the building of = the pipe facades. It appears that Estey may have made use of numerous = "standard" designs. However, many of these drawings are identified by = opus number or church name. In some instances there are 2-3 drawings = for a given church, perhaps indicating possible variations on the case = design.   These drawings would be wonderful if matted and framed. I am willing to = make copies for anyone who might be interested. Please drop me a line = with any requsts you may have, and I'll be glad to see if I have a = drawing for you.   Phil Stimmel pca@sover.net www.esteyorgan.com    
(back) Subject: RE: Haskelling From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Sun, 18 Apr 2004 16:10:18 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   Hi David & Folks: Please let me know if there is a formula for the proportions and a description for the proceedings. I have a case here where Haskelling could be a better solution than mitering the pipes, but I want to do it right = the first time. Unfortunatedly I don't have an easy access to the US patent office- unless they are accesible thru Internet. (Yes, I will try Google- when I have the time. Very busy days, for that my silence) :)   Cheers :) Andres =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.    
(back) Subject: Music of Samuel Walter From: "Robert Eversman" <highnote@mhtc.net> Date: Sun, 18 Apr 2004 18:10:18 -0500   Hi list members,   I have played and very much enjoyed the organ music of Samuel Walter who used to be the organist/choirmaster at St. John's Church, Stamford Conn. back in the early 1960s I have heard a few of the following anthems but never seen the music. If any of you have these in your library I would really appreciate a single well made copy and will take care of postage = and a $5.00 tip for each anthem supplied. I will take care of the copyright clearance with Abbington you can be sure. I think my choir might enjoy = some of his works.   I listed to a recording in a friend's private library of one of his church services back in 1961 or so, he was playing Hyfrydol like I have never = heard it played since !!! I get goose bumps just thinking about it. Truly an inspired musician.   Here they are: (I got the following info from the James Laster book (what = a wonderful resource !)).   1) Blessed Are the Pure In Heart Abington (1961) APM-190 SATB unaccomp.   2) The Lord Reigneth Abington (1962) APM-203 SATB or SA + keyboard   3) Holy, Holy, Holy Abington (1961) APM-172 SATB unaccomp.   4) They That Wait Upon the Lord C.C. Birchard (1955) 2102 SATB keyboard   5) Peace Be Unto You Abington (1963) APM-279 SATB organ   Thanks ! Robert highnote@mhtc.net (Please email me directly regarding copies to be mailed, otherwise please share this topic of discussion with the group...THANKS)        
(back) Subject: Carlo on Wanamaker Organ NEXT Saturday From: "Robert Ridgeway" <robert@magneticlab.com> Date: Sun, 18 Apr 2004 21:12:21 -0500       This is a must-attend concert for all lovers of romantic organ music played= =20 on the world's largest playing pipe organ by the world's formerly largest=20 organist. Carlo has managed over the past two years to shed 150 pounds! He= =20 is now trim and filled with more stamina than ever before. I attended a=20 concert he gave in Grand Rapids at Thanksgiving and I believe he is playing= =20 better now than ever before. Go to his website=20 (<http://www.carlo.com/>www.carlo.com) to see pictures and hear MP-3 sound= =20 bites.   Carlo performs the Opening Concert Celebrating the Centenary Year of the=20 Wanamaker Grand Court Organ, Lord & Taylor, Philadelphia, the World's=20 Largest Playing Pipe Organ (6 manuals /28,482 pipes)   Saturday, April 24th at 2.30pm FREE ADMISSION       The Opening Recital Program Celebrating the Monumental Instrument's Centenary Year * Sir Arthur Sullivan: The Lost Chord (arr.: Curley) * John Stanley: Trumpet Voluntary in D * J. S. Bach: Chorale Prelude: O Mensch, beweindeinS=FCnde gross (O Man,= =20 Bewail Thy Grievous Sin), BWV 622 * Marcel Dupr=E9: Prelude and Fugue in G-minor, Op. 7, No.3 * John Stanley: Voluntary in F A Fancy * J. S. Bach: Passacaglia and Fugue in C-minor, BWV 582 * Richard Wagner: Liebestod ("Love-Death"), from Tristan and Isolde=20 (arr.: Curley) * Sir Edward Elgar: Sonata in G, Op. 28 (Allegro maestoso, Allegretto,= =20 Andante espressivo, Presto (comodo))   The Lord and Taylor store is located in downtown Philadelphia at 13th and=20 Market Streets. It is diagonally across from City Hall. Lord and Taylor=20 has been a good steward of this musical treasure so when you attend the=20 program please browse through the store and buy something. The quality of= =20 their merchandise is high and when the management sees hundreds of people=20 attend this program AND leave carrying L&T shopping bags it will reinforce= =20 in their mind that this is a sound business decision as well as a positive= =20 cultural force in the city.   Robert Ridgeway, Curator Sanfilippo Collection Barrington Hills, IL              
(back) Subject: It played in Peoria From: "black" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Sun, 18 Apr 2004 22:01:06 -0500   HI list, What a great weekend in Peoria! Thomas Trenney accompanied the silent movie, The Phantom of the Opera on the 1973 4 manual Moller housed = at First Baptist. A problem with the organ just before showtime was capably taken care of by Rich Schneider of Schneider Pipe Organs. No music was = used at all to the hour and forty-five minute movie. It was a wonderful experience for me, not to be forgotten.   This afternoon he performed on the tracker 1897 Lancashire-Marshall Pipe Organ originally installed in the present building, St. Martin's. Music = was chosen that would have been performed at the time of the organ's instillation. Vierne, Buck, Durafle (sp,sorry) and Franck were represented and played very well indeed. A cipher happened, but Thomas was able to 'play around that' just fine. If anyone on this list ever gets the opportunity to hear Mr. Trenney, it is a 'must do' in my opinion. Gary      
(back) Subject: It played in Peoria From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Sun, 18 Apr 2004 22:45:20 -0500   Gary Black wrote: > HI list, What a great weekend in Peoria! Thomas Trenney accompanied the > silent movie, The Phantom of the Opera on the 1973 4 manual Moller = housed at > First Baptist. A problem with the organ just before showtime was = capably > taken care of by Rich Schneider of Schneider Pipe Organs. No music was = used > at all to the hour and forty-five minute movie. It was a wonderful > experience for me, not to be forgotten.   It was with considerable regret that my wife and I were unable to stay for this Friday evening program, but other commitments precluded our being = able to "hang around!" As it was, we returned home just about midnight Friday evening! > This afternoon he performed on the tracker 1897 Lancashire-Marshall Pipe > Organ originally installed in the present building, St. Martin's. Music = was > chosen that would have been performed at the time of the organ's > instillation. Vierne, Buck, Durafle (sp,sorry) and Franck were = represented > and played very well indeed. A cipher happened, but Thomas was able to > 'play around that' just fine.   It was nice to visit with Gary and a couple of other "cohorts in crime" after the program. As Gary mentioned, the organ and the music performed = on them were both a good "fit" for each other.   Actually, the action is Tracker with pneumatic assist (Barker Machine) Besides the earlier cipher, there was also a dead "G" in the middle of the Swell manual, which made the rendition of the Buck "Last Rose of Summer" a most interesting experience, since the solo line often called for that note! At times, Tom tried substituting notes an octave higher or other impromptu "work-arounds", but the dead "G" certainly caused some interesting silent places, for which he apologized (but it was hardly his fault. . .)   Other than these minor annoyances, the program was indeed worth the trip = to Peoria! In fact, just visiting the inside of the church was a very uplifting experience. St. Martin de Porres was recently re-decorated and the effect is very lovely. It's wonderful to see and hear the original instrument in the space intended for it with virtually no alteration. The folks there are to be commended for their preserving that portion of the past although I hope that they DO get those dead note/cipher problems resolved (I haven't cared for, nor currently care for this instrument, = BTW! -just want to avoid any "finger-pointing" for the problems enumerated. . = .)   Faithfully,   G. A. -- Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO <>< Schneider Pipe Organs, Inc. 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (877) 944-2454 TOLL-FREE (217) 944-2527 FAX arpschneider@starband.net Home Office EMAIL arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com URL ADDRESS  
(back) Subject: Re: It played in Peoria From: "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 18 Apr 2004 22:40:05 -0700 (PDT)   Nice meeting you "again" Richard     =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Scott Montgomery 619 W Church St Champaign, IL 61820 217-390-0158 www.scottmontgomerymusic.net     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Photos: High-quality 4x6 digital prints for 25=A2 http://photos.yahoo.com/ph/print_splash  
(back) Subject: PIPE ORGAN ON EBAY - the fallout continues to fall [x-posted] From: "Charlie Lester" <crlester@137.com> Date: Sun, 18 Apr 2004 23:06:06 -0700   While I am the one who listed the pipe organ on eBay, I have no connection with the church other than very peripherally: Their music director's daughter is the youth choir director at one of my churches. I just listed their organ for them on eBay as my "good deed for the day."   For those in the area who would like to inspect the organ, I'd say the best thing to do would be to just go by the church on a Sunday if you can. I believe their service is at 11 a.m. so it would probably be over around 12-12:30. Tell 'em you saw the organ listed on eBay and you want to have a look at it. The church is called Hope Community Church, at 344 W. Florence Ave., just where the Harbor Freeway crosses over - near Broadway.   There's a large number of older church buildings in the South Central area that had pipe organs once upon a time but most of them are either in states of dire neglect, or are gone altogether. Sad to say, but what can you do?   There is a real problem with finding organists to play in these churches. Many, er, "discriminating" organists are unwilling [or afraid] to go to --*AHEM*-- "those" neighborhoods to play. After an organ has sat, for years, unused, can you really fault their stewards for considering them unnecessary at this point?   It's awfully hard to convince evangelical, small-sized congregations to spend -- in many cases -- high-five or low-six figures just to REPAIR an organ that they aren't even using in the first place -- particularly when there are so many other critical budget items, on very long lists, clamoring for attention. AND particularly when their style of music and worship pretty much precludes pipe organs. Most gospel music just doesn't "fly" on pipe organs. Especially mediocre ones.   Except for a rare few organists, most of us cannot play BOTH classical AND gospel -- and I mean PLAY WELL - and in the appropriate styles. Indeed, I know first-hand of but two such organists. And one of them is me. But that's what most of these churches want. Either someone who can play both, or who can play gospel music. That's most-often the preference.   Whether or not it's what they "NEEEEED" or "SHOULD HAVE" is a different matter and is certainly open for debate. [Notwithstanding those would presume to dictate the music & liturgical doings of every other church on the planet --- often to the neglect of their own situations.]   Indeed, in most of these cases, the churches really don't have any desire to be "educated" about why they "MUST" keep their pipe organs, regardless of condition or merit, and why they should be using it; even more so when the organ is of negligible worth anyway: Just because an organ has pipes doesn't mean any more than "it has pipes." They aren't all worth saving.   The organ at hand is a case in point. Other than some of the pipework and the nice little console and the Peterson relay, there is absolutely nothing about it to recommend itself for regular church use. Even if it was in 100% top playing condition. It's highly unified, with no independent upperwork; there are no principal ranks at all in the Swell; and no solo reeds; no independent Pedal work; and is comprised of mismatched stops that do not suit one another at all.   Even though I put a request in the auction listing for people to please not write and make "suggestions" for what the church should do with the organ, a number of folks have done so anyway. One wrote, rather insistently, "You must not remove that organ! Put the money into it needed to restore it, and then use it!!"   All I can say to those who are inclined to make such "helpful" suggestions is, if these people would be willing to donate the funds to the church for the restoration of the organ, I am sure they would be happy to receive such a generous financial gift. Otherwise, "MYOB." (Fat chance of that...)   And, somebody would also need to be willing to show up on Sundays to play it. I am telling you it is a shameful but bald-faced truth that inner-city and urban-ethnic churches typically have a very hard time finding musicians of any kind or caliber, let alone classically trained organists. And that's really too bad. Because until you've sat through a three-hour C.O.G.I.C. revival where the joyful music and roof-raising preaching "FILLS YOU WITH THE HOLY GHOST," well, honey, you just haven't been to church!   Yes, Yes, I know, to many of us organists, pipe organs should always get top priority. Unfortunately, our priority lists do not always (indeed, hardly ever) jibe with those of church councils and authorities. Particularly, again, when the organ is just one line item on a very long list of line items.   The best possible home for this organ would be an organist's home, or a practice room, or in a chapel where it will not be called upon to play "the literature." Because it just wouldn't cut it.   As far as how much they will get for it is concerned, I can tell you "confidentially" that the greater concern really is that they simply be rid of it. Indeed, if it doesn't attract any bids, it will be removed and sold for scrap to a salvage company.   Yes, that makes me very sad. But it's their organ, their right to do with it as they choose. The only real reason I agreed to help them by listing it on eBay was that hopefully someone who could use it would have the opportunity to come get it before it just gets junked.   I'd go get it myself if I had anywhere in the world to put it. But I don't; nor do I have the money to give them to fix it up. So I have done the best that I can for them ---- and must leave it up to someone who does have the space to take advantage of it. Or who will give the church the money to renovate it. And, still, not have it be used, most likely.   --oOo--   A final thought -- it just so happened that today, I played for a "Metropolitan Baptist" Sunday-afternoon revival, that, yes, went on for a good three hours. But believe me, you'd never have known it. The time just flew right by. Everyone was too busy "Havin' Chech" to watch the clock.   The hosting congregation -- The Greater Temple of Deliverance Metropolitan Baptist -- borrowed our facilities at Faith Lutheran because they anticipated a larger turnout than their tiny storefront church could accommodate.   There were many other choirs and musicians there, including Yours Truly, who by and large used the piano or B3+Leslie. However, a soloist from my own congregation was there to sing; and even though she chose a contemporary piece -- a very touching gospel song entitled "I've Just Seen Jesus" -- an Easter song about the resurrection -- I decided to accompany her on the Casavant.   It was thrilling, glorious, exciting ----- the soloist has a great voice, and the church-folk just ------ well, let's simply say that they certainly showed their appreciation! (If you've never attended this kind of service, it does little good to try and describe it. Too much gets lost in the translation.)   Most of the people there had never heard this kind of music played on a pipe organ. Several of the other organists ("Hammondistes") smirked at me with skeptical bemusement as I made my way up to the organ loft; but then gave me great smiles, hugs, back-slaps, and "AMENS" of admiration afterward. One of them said, "I just COULD NOT BELIEVE how that pipe organ fills the place up with sound --- it seems to just come from everywhere at once! I sure wish we had a pipe organ in my church! You-all really are bless-sed!!"   And I might add, I also got some looks of "skeptical bemusement" as I sat down to the B3 for the first time ----- as I frequently do in these kinds of services ----- but I can hold my own on a B3 as well as any organist can, and it doesn't take very long at all to win folks over. I could regale you with some hilarious, sweet, highly complimentary, but also highly "politically incorrect" accolades that I've gotten over the years. (Eh, Monte?!)   "And So It Goes."   ~ C