PipeChat Digest #4448 - Thursday, April 22, 2004
 
RE: Organs in Seizmic areas...was: Man Nearly Crushed by PipeOrgan
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
Re: Super-octave  couplers --- and sub-octave, for that matter...
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: Organs in Seizmic areas...was: Man Nearly Crushed by PipeOrgan
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
: Dupr=E9 House Organ - 73--Note Manuals
  by "Mark W. McClellan" <omicron@prairieinet.net>
Dupr=E9's house organ - Murray
  by "dballesteros" <dballesteros@uol.com.br>
Re: Man Nearly Crushed by Pipe Organ
  by "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com>
Halifax
  by "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Re: Felix Hell update
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Dupr=E9 House Organ - 73--Note Manuals
  by "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net>
Mark Scholtz-Washington CT 4-18-04
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: RE: Organs in Seizmic areas...was: Man Nearly Crushed by PipeOrgan From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Wed, 21 Apr 2004 22:25:42 +0100   They designed it to look like the quake had already hit it, so nobody will notice any difference!     Will Light Coventry UK   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of T.Desiree' Hines Sent: 21 April 2004 16:36 To: PipeChat Subject: Organs in Seizmic areas...was: Man Nearly Crushed by PipeOrgan       The Disney Organ to me has such wonder because that design will of course, have to deal with quakes. Im wondering what they did for that?       From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610          
(back) Subject: Re: Super-octave couplers --- and sub-octave, for that matter... From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Wed, 21 Apr 2004 18:38:58 EDT   Charlie wrote: >My understanding, and use of, super-octave couplers >generally is to allow one to use solo stops in a different >register in order to give more flexibility. And while this >may be more critical on a modest instrument of limited >resources, there are times where even on an 80-stop organ, >such couplers can come in handy.   Even on the new organ at my church, I specified couplers making everything =   couple everywhere at every pitch. I did it for the simple reason of = coloration and solo effects. I can't help what another organist might do to abuse = the controls, but I know what I have in mind for them. If when I'm playing a = piece, I want the Solo Basset Horn in the Pedal at 4', I need the Solo-Pedal 4' coupler. I might want the Swell 4' Flute at 8' pitch, and need the 16' = coupler because it is the color of flute I'm looking for. Some people might abuse = the privelege that the couplers are there, but I don't think that I should be limited just because someone MIGHT use them at some point.   I once played a Schoenstein organ in recital that prevented the abuse of = the super couplers but not letting the mixtures go through the supers, only = the manual 16'-2' stops, which I thought was a clever way to circumvent the possibility that the screechy registrations might occur. However, I have = been known to use an enclosed mixture and a 16' Flute coupled at 4' pitch to get a = tinkly effect on a piece like Britten's "Jubilate Deo" when a suitable right hand =   registration wasn't available. In times like that, I wouldn't want to be = limited by the organ not being able to do what I wanted it to do. I would rather = the organist use his or her ears and a severe case of good judgement than = having the organ not let me register it how I would want it, conventional or not.   Monty Bennett    
(back) Subject: Re: Organs in Seizmic areas...was: Man Nearly Crushed by PipeOrgan From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 21 Apr 2004 19:22:45 -0400   On 4/21/04 5:25 PM, "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> wrote:   > They designed it to look like the quake had already hit it, so nobody = will > notice any difference! > > Oh, these strait-laced Brits! > > Alan tee hee >      
(back) Subject: : Dupr=E9 House Organ - 73--Note Manuals From: "Mark W. McClellan" <omicron@prairieinet.net> Date: Wed, 21 Apr 2004 18:33:32 -0500   They are setterboards for the combination action.   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>     Thank you for showing us the pictures of M. Dupre's house organ.   I cannot see too well, but what are the things that are on each side of = the manuals? Are they more stops, or are they something to do with a midi control?        
(back) Subject: Dupr=E9's house organ - Murray From: "dballesteros" <dballesteros@uol.com.br> Date: Wed, 21 Apr 2004 20:34:55 -0300   Dear Bob,   In that time, when I was to Meudon, I didn't speak any word in french. I was with my husband who in that time spoke something in French. So he was my voice. This is a first point. The second point, is: We went to Meudon, how one says in Brazil, 'with the face and the courage", because we didn't have any contact. We have only a address I was copy to the book (Michael Murray): "Boulevard des Deux Gares". In Meudon, doesn't exist more one street with this name. To find the Dupr=E9's house was a true taskwork. There was a Sunday, in Summer. The heat that did here, I thought only was possible in Rio. There was anything in the streets. ANYTHING. After one hour, we find a big map in one corner street. We saw one street named "Marcel Dupr=E9'. In this Street, we saw one woman, a holy woman. This woman was very patient to wait and understand what we speak, or was trying to speak. She call the owner of the Dupr=E9's house. He is a pharmaceutical. He allowed we went your house. I don't was wainting for this. When I entered in Dupr=E9's Hall, I think I would have a stroke. The time I was in the organ was 10 or 15 minutes, and then, we went to garden. I was not able to understand what it is this system. And today, before read the Michael Murray book about Dupr=E9, I'm not still understand. But, I will copy Words of Darius Milhaud, quoted by Michael Murray in your book "MArcel Dupr=E9, The work of a Master Organist" (1985, Northeastern University Press) where he writes about this. And, if you understand exactely what is this device, please, tell me.   "for some eight years after buying Guilmant's organ, Dupr=E9 was to leave its design untouched. Then in 1934 he began to make farseeing changes in its mechanical gear, leaving unchanged its voicing, which he considered perfection itself: he hoped by his experiments to suggest new vistas to organ builders and composers of the future. He intended most of his changes to increase the organ's flexibility, rendering more versatile its original twenty- eight stops and the six he added in 1934 as a solo division. He removed and carefully stored the old three-manual console, designing in its place a four-manual console of adjustable combinations and electric action. He equipped each manual with a sostenuto device (the old console had had only one) that allowed any note or chord to be held automatically until replaced with another or released by a lever, the levers conveniently placed in the keyslips. He devised a system allowing one registration to be played from the top half of any keyboard and another from the bottom. He extended the manual compasses and pipework to seventy-three notes, installed switches to remove from the crescendo pedal the sixteen-foot couplers or mixtures or reeds, and tested a device that used thirty-five millimeter film to record and execute any sequence of registrations. He was indeed to call the revised instrument 'an organ of the year 2000." (p. 138, the italics is mine)   I hope it help you. And remember, if you understand this "thirty-five millimeter film", please, don't hesitate in tell me. I have one or two photos where one can see the pedalboarding and the pedal expression, etc. Tomorrow, I'll scan this photos and up load to the page.   Regadrs, Domitila Bob Conway wrote: Miss D. Ballesteros,   Thank you for showing us the pictures of M. Dupre's house organ.   I cannot see too well, but what are the things that are on each side of the manuals? Are they more stops, or are they something to do with a midi control?   I hope that you can tell us.   Bob Conway       At 08:51 AM 4/21/2004, you wrote: Hi, list.   In 2001, when I was in Paris, I had a honnour and a hapiness to go to Dupr=E9's house in Meudon. When I entered in your house I felt how as if was entering in a book. I saw the image, personally, the image I saw, many times, in the books, in the net. Well, I was a opportunity to play in this organ. And for that, of course, I have photos of Dupr=E9's organ. There it is the keyboard. For those that want to see, go to:   http://www.ballesteros.mus.br/dupreshouse.html   Sorry, but I am going with the pictures. ;-)   Lewwill@aol.com wrote: Dear Listers   When Dupre replaced the original Cavaille-Coll console on his house organ with the present modern one, he had the manual compasses extended to 73 notes. It was one of his innovative ideas that he implemented, along with the sostenuto couplers and the pedal divide.   Lew Williams         --- Acabe com aquelas janelinhas que pulam na sua tela. AntiPop-up UOL - =C9 gr=E1tis! http://antipopup.uol.com.br   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org           --- Acabe com aquelas janelinhas que pulam na sua tela. AntiPop-up UOL - =C9 gr=E1tis! http://antipopup.uol.com.br    
(back) Subject: Re: Man Nearly Crushed by Pipe Organ From: "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com> Date: Wed, 21 Apr 2004 19:41:01 -0400   Subject: Man Nearly Crushed by Pipe Organ >From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> >Date: Wed, 21 Apr 2004 09:39:42 -0400   >I guess it must have been a portative.   >-WG   >>www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,117683,00.html   The original story at http://www.morningjournal.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=3D11333345&BRD=3D1699&PA= G=3D461&dept_id=3D46371&rfi=3D8 makes no mention of pipes whatsoever.    
(back) Subject: Halifax From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Wed, 21 Apr 2004 19:43:40 -0400   OOps, sorry, when in Ottawa last year I heard the RCCO was to be in = Halifax NS in 2005. Must have been changed. My enjoyment, since I am a Casavant fan, had mainly to do with the organs heard and the music played on them. But the hospitality was great also. My favorite recital in Ottawa was Fred Swann at Notre Dame Cathedral the organ of which was originally a Joseph Casavant of the 1850's, and the intricate case still is there from that era. The city was then a town called Bytown. And the gorgeous Bruyere Convent Chapel with Rachel Lauren and Bob ___ at that Casavant. My favorites in Toronto were Naji Hakim & organ, with Gillian Weir and organ a close second. My favorites in Quebec City were: the performance of the two student winners and Violons du Roy (?sp.) at St. Martyr, Gilles Rioux at Notre Dame Cathedral and Dany Wiseman in Levis. All Casavants! I had the opportunity last November to hear Dany play at Levis for my friend and I, thanks to Simon Couture of Casavant Freres, and to play that one myself. Such a nice restoration and beautiful sanctuary. The wind = was so strong that day, that when returning to the car, it nearly knocked me over! The church is high on a cliff over the St. Lawrence River. So much for Canada when it isn't even winter yet! And everyone had their = Christmas decorations up, second week in Nov.! There are so many very talented organists in Canada we don't get to hear = in the US. Dany Wiseman has moved to Montreal now, I won't even try to specify favorites there, too many. Judy Ollikkala  
(back) Subject: Re: Felix Hell update From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 21 Apr 2004 19:00:45 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Back on track after a major computer failure, it was good to see news of Felix Hell.   A few people are fortunate enough to be "gifted" in the sense that everything they do seems strangely effortless and pre-ordained. It's what many Americans like to call focus.   It says so much that Felix has been able to add the Reger B-A-C-H to his repertoire in the midst of academic work; a work I battled with over a fairly lengthy period and never did master due to lack of time. Even now, I still pick up the copy and then shy away from it......it is definitely something to which I will return "someday."   Congratulations seems such an inadequate word, but I think Felix has earned it at the very least.   Let's just hope that, by the time I ever get to hear him in concert, he will still remember us all!!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Photos: High-quality 4x6 digital prints for 25=A2 http://photos.yahoo.com/ph/print_splash  
(back) Subject: Re: Dupr=E9 House Organ - 73--Note Manuals From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> Date: Wed, 21 Apr 2004 23:20:57 -0400   Dupre died about 10 years before MIDI was born. My guess is that they are setter boards for the pistons.   -WG   > "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> wrote: > > Miss D. Ballesteros, > > Thank you for showing us the pictures of M. Dupre's house organ. > > I cannot see too well, but what are the things that are on each side of = the > manuals? Are they more stops, or are they something to do with a midi = control? > > I hope that you can tell us. > > Bob Conway      
(back) Subject: Mark Scholtz-Washington CT 4-18-04 From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 00:33:27 -0400   Mark Scholtz - Washington, CT 4-18-04   A visit to Washington, Connecticut restores the soul, and getting there is part of the fun. Wherever you are coming from, you end up traveling = winding and hilly roads with great vistas. This past Sunday, the welcome greening = of the trees was much in evidence. You are in the lovely northwest part of = the state. Our goal: St. John's Episcopal Church in Washington, a fine = building, put up in the second decade of the 20th Century. The parish itself was founded in the late 1700s, as was the town.   http://www.stjohnswashington.com/index.htm   The U.R.L. above offers rich rewards, with excellent exterior and interior pictures of the building. There are fine sculptures and fine paintings, = all well photographed. You can see the handsome Organ cases on the south wall, one quite far east, directing sound to the choir, and the other further west, admitting sound into the nave. In the music section of the Website, there is complete information about this very successful Wicks Organ, = built in 1999.   Mark Scholtz has been Organist and Choirmaster at St. John's for 14 years. He studied first at Lebanon Valley College, and then went on to Oberlin College Conservatory of Music to earn a degree in Organ Performance, under Haskell Thomson. In 1990, he studied privately with Arthur Wills at Ely Cathedral, eventually giving premi=E8res of a number of works by Dr. Wills both in England and here in the U.S. Today's recital is a farewell recital for Mr. Scholtz, as, in the summer, he will begin work with the Wicks = Organ Company in Highland, IL, in the department of Voicing and Tonal Finishing. On to the recital of the day, a wonderful piece of programming with many delights, some old friends and some new:   To begin, a very clean and rhythmic performance of a Dudley Buck Triumphal March (Opus 26).   We, as Organists, owe a lot to the short-lived Percy Whitlock (1903-1946). Perhaps my biggest burst of Whitlock appreciation came via a recital by = Mark Brombaugh in a dedication series for the Organ in the chapel at Princeton = a dozen years ago. He played "Fantasie Choral for Organ No. 2 in F Sharp Major," and the memory of that work (and a recording thereof) have stayed with me ever since. As an encore, he played something wonderful from the "Plymouth Suite." A Google search will give you lots about Whitlock. = Today, Mark Scholtz played two very gentle works from "Seven Sketches on Verses from the Psalms," works of great beauty. One, called Pastorale, on the = first verse of Psalm 23, and a second, called Pr=E9ambule, on the second verse. = Two beautiful works, beautifully played.   If part of program building is an exercise in moods and textures, then we have gone now from the triumphalism of Budley the Duck through the = sweetness and elegance of the two Whitlock works, on into a continued elegance of a classical sort, in two settings of <In Dulci Jubilo,> the first assigned = BWV 751, but thought by some to be doubtful if charming Bach. This was = followed by BuxWV 197, for which the Zimbelstern was partially awakened. It sounded = a bit like it was dragging its bells behind it somewhat reluctantly.   For a perfect stylistic segue, Mark gave us a magnificent performance of = the great Prelude in G Minor of Buxtehude (BuxWV149). This majestic and = powerful work provided a kind of perfect and climactic close to the first half of = the Organ recital itself. It wasn't over, but here followed a wonderful interlude - an opportunity to sing Parry's wondrous tune, Jerusalem, using the Blake words - "And did those feet in ancient time . . . . " Here, both Organ and Organist had a different kind of chance to shine, and shine they both did, and singing for and with them both was a delight.   The "Six Pieces for Organ" were written by Herbert Howells early in the Second World War. Howells was Acting Organist at St. John's College, Cambridge at this time, and the European world was clearly going mad = around him. As Mark suggested in his always useful spoken remarks, at this time, Howells would seem to have been harking back to one of Britain's great musical ages, the 16th Century, when life was rather more in order. = "Master Tallis's Testament," the third piece of the six, is a work of immense beauty.   Gaston Litaize (1909-1991) was one of a substantial list of French blind Organists. Many names on that list come to mind easily, Langlais being, perhaps, the best known in recent years. The great Andr=E9 Marchal was another, and I am old enough to have heard him play several times in this country. During most of his career, Louis Veirne had only the smallest ability to see, and certainly not enough to read a score. The School for = the Young Blind in Paris provided Organ instruction for all of these = magnificent musicians, and many more. Read Rollin Smith's wonderful book, "Louis = Vierne, Organist of Notre Dame Cathedral" for a look inside the early lives of musicians whose names are now well known to us. Litaize is somewhat neglected as a composer. I think he stands a better chance now that his famous pupil, Olivier Latry, is being heard with increasing frequency both in this country and around the world. Mark Scholtz has also done his bit, = in a fine performance of "Variations sur un No=EBl Angevin," from a set of 12 substantial pieces of 1939. This made a grand ending to a truly splendid recital.   The large audience made its appreciation abundantly clear - more was = wanted! Mark chose not the toccata encore route, but rather something sweet and calming, one of the Elgar Vesper Voluntaries (published 1891). He did not say which one, and I was not clever enough to ask, but these are all = lovely pieces, and all the more precious in that Elgar wrote very little generic Organ music.   Thank you, Mark, for an evening full of beautiful music. I hope that your new work with Organ pipes will not stand in the way of your continuing to play them.   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com