PipeChat Digest #4449 - Thursday, April 22, 2004
 
Moller Tacit knob
  by "SHAWN M. GINGRICH" <shawn.gingrich@firstumchershey.org>
Re: Moller Tacit knob
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Moller Tacit knob
  by <OMusic@aol.com>
Re: Moller Tacit knob
  by "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
Re: Moller Tacit knob
  by "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
Subs and Supers
  by "Charlie Lester" <crlester@137.com>
I'll bet Dupre liked lots of couplers...
  by "Charlie Lester" <crlester@137.com>
RE: Moller Tacit knob
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
Northwest theatre organ and silent film series on TV tonight!
  by <MUSCUR@aol.com>
Re: Moller Tacit knob
  by "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
Re: Subs and Supers
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: I'll bet Dupre liked lots of couplers...
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Dupr=E9 and Couplers, from Jeanne Demes sieux's Diary
  by <Lewwill@aol.com>
Punch card systems
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Dupr=C8 and Couplers, from Jeanne Demessieux's Diary
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: Punch card systems
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
Marcel Dupr=E9 & the Theatre Organ
  by <Lewwill@aol.com>
Re: Punch card systems
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
great website
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: great website
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Punch cards etc.
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
and...Charles Babbage
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: Moller Tacit knob From: "SHAWN M. GINGRICH" <shawn.gingrich@firstumchershey.org> Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 09:25:03 -0400   I studied M. P. M=F6ller Opus 588, 1905 in Duncannon Presbyterian Church = (Duncannon, PA) and found a draw knob marked "Tacit." I know what the = Latin word "Tacet" means but what was the function of this knob on the = organ? To see the spec and a few photos visit = http://harrisburgago.com/AreaOrgans/DuncannonPresby/DuncannonPresby.HTM Thanks!   -------|\----- Shawn M. Gingrich, Minister of Music -------|/----- First United Methodist Church ------/|------ Hershey, PA 17033 -----|-(-)---- 717-533-9668 ------\|/----- shawn.gingrich@firstumchershey.org o/ =20    
(back) Subject: Re: Moller Tacit knob From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 11:50:03 EDT   In a message dated 4/22/2004 8:25:38 AM Central Daylight Time,=20 shawn.gingrich@firstumchershey.org writes: I studied M. P. M=F6ller Opus 588, 1905 in Duncannon Presbyterian Church=20 (Duncannon, PA) and found a draw knob marked "Tacit." I know what the Latin=20= word=20 "Tacet" means but what was the function of this knob on the organ? To see th= e=20 spec and a few photos visit=20 http://harrisburgago.com/AreaOrgans/DuncannonPresby/DuncannonPresby.HTM Thanks! It sounds like a stop that will silence any registration that is pulled...=20 allowing the organist to prepare registrations during the sermon etc... with= out=20 fear of accidentally hitting a key and making a scene. Just a guess- gfc                             Gregory Ceurvorst M.M. Organ Performance Student Northwestern University Director of Music and Organist St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL 847.332.2788 home 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Moller Tacit knob From: <OMusic@aol.com> Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 11:54:31 EDT   That is what the "Tacit" stop was on the Hill Green & Lane Pipe organ at = my home church, and the first organ I played. Lee    
(back) Subject: Re: Moller Tacit knob From: "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 12:38:09 -0400   Shawn:   I am the one responsible for the tacit knob on that organ. Thirty five years ago, when I knew everything there was to know about organ building, (I seem to have forgotten it all, or they changed all the information on me . . .or something . . . maybe I just grew up) I repaired that instrument and made a few tonal changes.   I sometime shudder to think about the work I used to do.   Anyway, there was a left over drawknob, and I though I would be funny. Jokes get old real fast, don't they!     Jim McFarland           On Thu, 22 Apr 2004 09:25:03 -0400 "SHAWN M. GINGRICH" <shawn.gingrich@firstumchershey.org> writes: > I studied M. P. M=F6ller Opus 588, 1905 in Duncannon Presbyterian > Church (Duncannon, PA) and found a draw knob marked "Tacit." I know > what the Latin word "Tacet" means but what was the function of this > knob on the organ? To see the spec and a few photos visit > http://harrisburgago.com/AreaOrgans/DuncannonPresby/DuncannonPresby.HTM > Thanks! > > -------|\----- Shawn M. Gingrich, Minister of Music > -------|/----- First United Methodist Church > ------/|------ Hershey, PA 17033 > -----|-(-)---- 717-533-9668 > ------\|/----- shawn.gingrich@firstumchershey.org > o/ > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related > topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > >  
(back) Subject: Re: Moller Tacit knob From: "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 12:41:24 -0400       By the way, Shawn, I checked out your link.   Those pedals are not ventils, just mechanical presets.     Jim       On Thu, 22 Apr 2004 09:25:03 -0400 "SHAWN M. GINGRICH" <shawn.gingrich@firstumchershey.org> writes: > I studied M. P. M=F6ller Opus 588, 1905 in Duncannon Presbyterian > Church (Duncannon, PA) and found a draw knob marked "Tacit." I know > what the Latin word "Tacet" means but what was the function of this > knob on the organ? To see the spec and a few photos visit > http://harrisburgago.com/AreaOrgans/DuncannonPresby/DuncannonPresby.HTM > Thanks! > > -------|\----- Shawn M. Gingrich, Minister of Music > -------|/----- First United Methodist Church > ------/|------ Hershey, PA 17033 > -----|-(-)---- 717-533-9668 > ------\|/----- shawn.gingrich@firstumchershey.org > o/ > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related > topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > >  
(back) Subject: Subs and Supers From: "Charlie Lester" <crlester@137.com> Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 10:53:07 -0700   Monty Bennett said,   =3D-> I would rather the organist use his or her ears and a severe case of good judgement than having the organ not let me register it how I would want it, conventional or not. <-=3D       Exactly. There's absolutely no reason, other than fetishistic and small-minded control issues [foisted on others by people who do not know how to think "outside the box"], not to provide couplers from every manual to every other manual at sub, unison and super, and to pedal at unison and super - on non-trackers, of course. And, for that matter, unison releases. One of the frustrations of my Casavant is that there are no Unison Offs.   I don't even really understand why - other than "convention" - Great to Choir and Swell (and Solo and Bombarde/Echo/Nave/Ethereal/Basement etc. if yer lucky) aren't provided. It really increases the flexibility of, in particular, a 3-manual organ --- particularly where there is no I-II manual transfer --- making some French literature easier to play.   The cost of such couplers is minimal and, with today's s/s relay systems, a cinch to create. So there's just really no reason not to have them.   Yes, yes, such newfangled gadgets are, to some folks, abominations and corruptions ---- well, to those who feel that way, it's simple: Just don't use 'em. But, as Monty said, don't be so narrow-minded as to leave 'em out so that those who DO want to use them -- and who have the registrational skills to do so -- CAN use 'em.   I do understand the limitations on digital instruments with gobs of couplers. And it used to be worse on a certain "major" brand than another. One organ salesman I know used to, as part of his sales tricks, show how he could play "more notes and stops" with his rig than he could with Brand X. Never mentioning, of course, that both instruments sounded like, well, doo-doo.     ~ C      
(back) Subject: I'll bet Dupre liked lots of couplers... From: "Charlie Lester" <crlester@137.com> Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 11:02:24 -0700   =3D-> [Dupr=E9] removed and carefully stored the old three-manual console, designing in its place a four-manual console of adjustable combinations and electric action. He equipped each manual with a sostenuto device that allowed any note or chord to be held automatically until replaced with another or released by a lever .... He devised a system allowing one registration to be played from the top half of any keyboard and another from the bottom .... and tested a device that used thirty-five millimeter film to record and execute any sequence of registrations. He was indeed to call the revised instrument 'an organ of the year 2000 .... <-=3D   I rest my case re couplers. If these kinds of registrational aids "were good enough for Dupr=E9," ...   ~ C      
(back) Subject: RE: Moller Tacit knob From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 14:24:12 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   Jim,   What was the exact function of that knob- a general canceller as = suggested, or a simple empty knob without function- in old times marked as "Tacet" or "Vacat", kept for symmetry or to avoid an empty hole? Just curious! :)   > I sometime shudder to think about the work I used to do.   When I look at the work when I was a starting greenhorn I wonder that it still holds together. BTW, it does << BIG G>>.   > Anyway, there was a left over drawknob, and I though I would be funny. > Jokes get old real fast, don't they! =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.      
(back) Subject: Northwest theatre organ and silent film series on TV tonight! From: <MUSCUR@aol.com> Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 14:39:09 EDT   For those in the Northwest there is an opportunity to see a television mini-documentary broadcast tonight covering the popular silent film series = at the Historic Everett Theatre, a restored historic area landmark located in = downtown Everett, Washington.   King 5's Evening Magazine show airs tonight, Thursday, April 22 starting = at 7 p.m. with the silent film story slated as one of the story segments.   Then this Sunday afternoon, Buster Keaton returns to the Everett Theatre = in the 1925 silent film "SEVEN CHANCES" accompanied by theatre organist = Dennis James as the next to last program on the spring Romance series. This is a = great comedy and fun for the whole family. The film starts at 2:00 P.M. on April =   25th.   For more information on this, and the remaining films in the Historic = Everett Silent Film Romance Series, visit = www.everetttheatre.org/silentsplease.html   For tickets and information, patrons may call the theatre at 425-258-6766. = The box office is open Tuesday through Saturday from noon to 5:00 p.m., = and for 45 minutes before the show. The Historic Everett Theatre is located at = 2911 Colby Avenue in downtown Everett.   Listing sent from: Silent Film Concerts 7095 Hollywood Boulevard, #483 Hollywood, CA 90028-8903 USA Phone: 323-883-1514 E-mail: muscur@aol.com   To be removed from this mailing list, please respond with written request = to muscur@aol.com        
(back) Subject: Re: Moller Tacit knob From: "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 15:42:56 -0400     On Thu, 22 Apr 2004 14:24:12 -0400 = =3D?iso-8859-1?B?QW5kculzIEf8bnRoZXI=3D?=3D <agun@telcel.net.ve> writes: > Andres Gunther > agun@telcel.net.ve > > Jim, > > What was the exact function of that knob?     I guess I was too cryptic with my previous answer.   The knob had no function. As I said, it was "left over." It had previously been a knob for a common bass - obviated by the tonal changes.   I guess I should have said "old jokes are sometimes not understood."     Jim  
(back) Subject: Re: Subs and Supers From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 11:51:42 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   I quite like sub and super couplers to Swell, Choir and Solo divisions on romantic instruments. For accompaniment purposes, they extend the flexibility of an instrument greatly.   Playing, as I do, a very baroque instrument, I would not want to have such devices on this particular instrument, for it is a balanced entity of very high tonal quality. However, I do not accompany anything other than RC liturgy. Where I stretch the boundary is when I just use a fistful of notes an octave higher or lower for a particular effect, but broadly speaking, I do not resort to tricks.   The problem with many instruments on both sides of the pond, is the concept that little can be made into lots more, simply by the use of extended ranks or sub and super couplers. It may be fine for an organ which is essentially an orchestral or theatre instrument, but quite alien to contrapuntal music, where the required chorus work is often compromised by extended ranks.   However, to repeat a tale I once wrote before, I found a very good use for a super-octave coupler on a fine Binns organ here in the UK. If Binns organs had/have a problem, it was in the fact that the Great Mixtures broke back rather quickly, and brilliance/clarity was lost rapidly above c1. Furthermore, being a Victorian instrument, the pedal organ was little more than 32ft, 16ft and 8ft, with virtually no melodic independence.   Thus, when asked to perform in recital the "Fugue on the Magnificat," I found a very neat way around the problem of a subtle (rather than thundering) independent pedal Cantus Firmus, as well as the lack of chorus brilliance and balance.   16ft to Mixture on the Great without reeds.   SWELL:- 8ft to Mixture plus 16ft and 8ft reeds (rather thin in tone) coupled to Pedals at unison pitch.   THEN, by coupling the same Swell combination at only Super Octave to Great, I got 8ft and 4ft reed tone which blended well AND ALSO the missing brilliance from the 2ft fifteenth and Swell Mixture speaking an octave higher.   It sounded quite magnificent, which is of course, what we should all strive towards!! So yes, octave and sub-octave couplers have unexpected as well as normal usage, and I personally like them, even if I seldom use them.   Amusingly, I once asked a Dutch organist why super-octave couplers were almost never found in Holland, where even on some old tracker organs in the UK, they were quite common in the 19th century.   At the time, we were in the Waalsekerk, Amsterdam, which is quite a "bright" (understatement here!) sound. Our ears were still ringing from the sound of all those Scharfs and Cymbels after the recital by Gustav Leonhardt.   He looked at me in that dead-pan way the Dutch do when they are being philosophical, patronising and pitying all at the same time, and replied, "Why also must we play music for the bats?"   A rather nice chap, who took everything very seriously, it was he who began referring to me as "the crazy Engeland orgel-spieler" when I suggested that organists might enjoy hearing the organ properly from a detached electric console at St.Bavo, Haarlem!!!!!!   One day.....possibly....I shall make him laugh!   I've been trying for years, but have never managed it.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK         --- Charlie Lester <crlester@137.com> wrote: > > > Exactly. There's absolutely no reason, other than > fetishistic and small-minded control issues [foisted > on > others by people who do not know how to think > "outside the > box"], not to provide couplers from every manual to > every > other manual at sub, unison and super, and to pedal > at > unison and super - on non-trackers, of course.     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Photos: High-quality 4x6 digital prints for 25=A2 http://photos.yahoo.com/ph/print_splash  
(back) Subject: Re: I'll bet Dupre liked lots of couplers... From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 17:19:52 EDT   In a message dated 4/22/2004 1:02:56 PM Central Daylight Time, crlester@137.com writes: He devised a system allowing one registration to be played from the top half of any keyboard and another from the bottom .... and tested a device that used thirty-five millimeter film to record and execute any sequence of registrations. He was indeed to call the revised instrument 'an organ of the year 2000 .... <-=3D Could this be what inspired Robert Noehren's punch card system? hmmmm gfc                   Gregory Ceurvorst M.M. Organ Performance Student Northwestern University Director of Music and Organist St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL 847.332.2788 home 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com    
(back) Subject: Dupr=E9 and Couplers, from Jeanne Demes sieux's Diary From: <Lewwill@aol.com> Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 17:47:45 EDT   Dear listers   In Christiane Trieu-Colleney's biography of Jeanne Demessieux, she cites an=20 excerpt from JD's diary relating to Dupr=E9's ideas on organ building:   page 136, Jeanne Demessieux: Une Vie de Luttes et de Gloire. The following=20 is in my own translation.   July 13th, 1942 Demessieux relates: "Finished with our work, we chat for=20 awhile. His [Dupr=E9's] ideas on organ building have made him some enemies.=20   Dupre: 'He who takes the first step usually gets hit on the head. I would=20 hope that one day I will see, in some part, the organ I dream of: a small=20 instrument with transposition of octaves.   Demessieux: An organ that will go further than this one? [Dupr=E9's house or= gan]   Dupr=E9: Yes, for the couplers. Couplers of three octaves on the same manua= l.=20 One must have two rows of tablets, one above the other, for each manual. If= =20 you need a complete stop, simply engage the two tablets. I'm also consideri= ng=20 individual swell boxes, one box for each stop. As for the pistons, you can s= et=20 them up on the setterboard.'   Demessieux: So from this point on, we're talking of orchestration at the=20 organ?   Dupr=E9: Indeed, that's my idea"   Any comments?       Lew Williams    
(back) Subject: Punch card systems From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 15:11:30 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   I don't want to get technical, but............   Fascinating thing, punchcard systems, which were so useful for the builders of band or fair-organs in the 19th century, and which also included registration changes.   "Clever people in the 19th century," you may think, but not a bit of it!   In point of fact, the punchcard system was originally a tracker-action affair invented by Jaquard, the inventor of the automated textile loom utilising a folding punch-card into which large pins dropped or were drawn out. By adjusting the weft (?) of the textile thread, coloured patterns could be woven automatically by means of wires attached to the loom mechanism at one end, and the metal pins of the punch-card mechanism at the other.   In fact, the Jaquard Loom was not a 19th century invention at all, but dates, if I recall correctly, from the 1770's!!   Engineers apparently site this invention as one of the most perfect of all time, and it was so successful, it is still in use to-day; albeit in sophisticated form.   Also, as loom machinery developed, the punchcard mechanism utilised a considerable amount of pneumatic-action....hence the conversion of the idea by Gavioli et Cie into a fairground organ mechanism of astonishing reliability and effectiveness.   Of course, using optics or other sensors, it is a simple matter to incorporate electronic switching and to reduce the size of the mechanism down to that of punched tape control, but that didn't happen until perhaps the 1960's (?)   Eventually, it all went digital as we know, but the essential theory is almost as old as Bach himself.   Interesting also, that Wurlitzer, who made many Band or Fair Organs, should use the punchcard mechanism in America. The Wurlitzer company was also as old as Bach, for the family originated from an old German violin making company in the 18th century.   It poses the question, "Could Bach have played a Wurlitzer?"   Of course, one could go on about the unfinished "tracker action" computer invented by Sir Charles Babbage, who hated street organs and buskers, and who in company with Mr Bass (the brewing magnate) got a UK act of parliament passed which banished such things from the streets.   How amusing, that Charles Babbage, along with Jaquard, fascilitated the invention of the modern computing organ.....delicious irony at its best.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK         --- Gfc234@aol.com wrote:   > Could this be what inspired Robert Noehren's punch > card system? > hmmmm > gfc       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Photos: High-quality 4x6 digital prints for 25=A2 http://photos.yahoo.com/ph/print_splash  
(back) Subject: Re: Dupr=C8 and Couplers, from Jeanne Demessieux's Diary From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 15:22:03 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Absolutely fascinating Lew!   I can't say that I am surprised, for Dupre was a regular recitalist in America and the UK, where there were extrordinary developments in electric-action as we all know.   Back in France, organ-building style virtually ground to a halt after Cavaille-Coll, so I can well imagine that Dupre would be impressed by any mechanism which would allow him to paint the vast musical picture "on the hoof" as an improvisor. Listening to the improvised "Passion Symphony," all that orchestral colour and expression is there in the music.   Lew, I feel sure, will know that Dupre was also exposed to Cinema Organs, and in fact, deputised as a cinema organist in Paris for a week or two, at some point in his life.   Talk of double and treble octave coupling is, of course, virtually the same thing as the unit organ principle.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK         --- Lewwill@aol.com wrote: > Dear listers > > In Christiane Trieu-Colleney's biography of Jeanne > Demessieux, she cites an > excerpt from JD's diary relating to Dupr=E9's ideas on > organ building:       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Photos: High-quality 4x6 digital prints for 25=A2 http://photos.yahoo.com/ph/print_splash  
(back) Subject: RE: Punch card systems From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Fri, 23 Apr 2004 00:04:51 +0100   If you come and visit Coventry, you can see a huge Jacquard loom in the museum, which was built to weave about 8 ribbons with pictures on them, (Stevensgraphs) at the same time. Fascinating. We also have a huge = Museum of Road Transport, which has just been rebuilt - everything from wooden hobby-horse bicycles to the fastest cars in the world. (Thrust II and = Thrust SSC) Well worth a visit! We have at least one good organ too!   Will Light Coventry UK     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Colin Mitchell Sent: 22 April 2004 23:12 To: PipeChat Subject: Punch card systems      
(back) Subject: Marcel Dupr=E9 & the Theatre Organ From: <Lewwill@aol.com> Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 19:37:10 EDT   Dear Colin & Listers   Dupr=E9 did have several encounters with the theatre organ during his career= ..=20 In 1929 he dedicated the huge 6/63 (or so) Barton organ in the Chicago Stadi= um.=20 A story is told that when Dupr=E9 first saw the massive red and gold console= =20 perched high in the balcony, he turned to Dan Barton, the builder, and said=20= "I=20 can't play this organ!" "Why not?" countered Barton, "you are the world's=20 greatest organist."   Dupr=E9 also counted among his students Tommy Desserre, who would become the= =20 organist at the Gaumont Palace in Paris, with it's 4/16 Christie organ. He a= lso=20 played solo spots from time to time, if memory serves, at both the Gaumont a= nd=20 Theatre Pigalle.   An English organ enthusiast friend of mine, Don Inkster, heard Dupr=E9 play=20= a=20 concert at Wimbledon Town Hall in the 1940s, which had a 3-manual Christie i= n=20 it. During the improvisation, Dupr=E9 occasionally reached out his hand to=20= a=20 stopkey, and the castenets would clatter for a moment. Later on, the tambou= rine=20 would shake. Don, who was seated at an angle and could observe Dupr=E9's fac= e,=20 said that a very faint smile would appear at these moments.   Lew Williams    
(back) Subject: Re: Punch card systems From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 19:52:47 -0400   On 4/22/04 6:11 PM, "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:   > Of course, one could go on about the unfinished "tracker action" = computer > invented by Sir Charles Babbage, who hated street organs and buskers, = and who > in company with Mr Bass (the brewing magnate) got a UK act of parliament > passed which banished such things from the streets. > > How amusing, that Charles Babbage, along with Jaquard, fascilitated the > invention of the modern computing organ.....delicious irony at its best.   Colin, this is not modesty, but blunt honesty. I am UTTERLY ignorant. = But I do remember the [five-hole] punched tapes of 1950 (began to be able to read them at the telegraph office), and I think I catch the irony of what you're saying--and you are so RIGHT! (Chuck Babbage for sainthood!)   Alan      
(back) Subject: great website From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 20:26:47 EDT   Just wanted to share a WONDERFUL website with everyone: http://orgel.com/home-e.html Enjoy! gfc                     Gregory Ceurvorst M.M. Organ Performance Student Northwestern University Director of Music and Organist St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL 847.332.2788 home 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com    
(back) Subject: Re: great website From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 17:35:16 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   The "CUBE" organ web-site is fascinating.   Be aware that, in the available mp3 downloads, the names of Carlo Curley and Paulo Paulini are interchangeable!   Enjoy!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- Gfc234@aol.com wrote: > Just wanted to share a WONDERFUL website with > everyone: > http://orgel.com/home-e.html       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Photos: High-quality 4x6 digital prints for 25=A2 http://photos.yahoo.com/ph/print_splash  
(back) Subject: Punch cards etc. From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 17:51:58 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   My post about Jacquard (correct spelling this time) Looms and Charles Babbage re: computing history, can be found in greater detail on the following URL:-   http://www.csc.liv.ac.uk/~ped/teachadmin/histsci/htmlform/lect4.html   I was delighted to confirm my memory of the subject, and fascinated that, in this one web site, the names of Jacquard and Babbage follow one another in a brief synopsis of early computing.   Worth a look!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK           __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Photos: High-quality 4x6 digital prints for 25=A2 http://photos.yahoo.com/ph/print_splash  
(back) Subject: and...Charles Babbage From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 18:19:08 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   I found the following on a BBC history website about Charles Babbage:-   In his last years he (Babbage) became increasingly eccentric, claiming that large portions of his life were wasted listening to the music of buskers. His parliamentary act to ban street musicians was so unpopular that people would hound him in the street, throwing dead cats at him and even threatening his life. Following his death, his ground-breaking ideas were forgotten and his unpublished notes were discovered only in 1937. In 1991 Difference Engine 2 was finally built to Babbage's specifications: it was accurate to 31 decimal places.   -o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK         __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Photos: High-quality 4x6 digital prints for 25=A2 http://photos.yahoo.com/ph/print_splash