PipeChat Digest #4450 - Friday, April 23, 2004
 
Re: Moller Tacit knob
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Personal Organ Crawl in Gainesville, Florida
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: PipeChat Digest #4449 - 04/22/04
  by "Christopher Howerter" <OrgelspielerKMD@msn.com>
Barbara Owen
  by "Richard Hazelip" <rhazelip1@yahoo.com>
Reverence in Worship
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
Re: Reverence in Worship
  by "Sand Lawn" <glawn@jam.rr.com>
Re: Reverence in Worship
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
Re: Reverence in Worship
  by "Sand Lawn" <glawn@jam.rr.com>
Re: Reverence in Worship
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Moller Tacit knob From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 21:49:12 EDT     In a message dated 04/22/04 9:25:44 AM, shawn.gingrich@firstumchershey.org =   writes:   << http://harrisburgago.com/AreaOrgans/DuncannonPresby/DuncannonPresby.HTM = >>   Whatever it means, the organ has, unfortunately, been altered. Although a somewhat lackluster instrument to some, it would have been better left as = an unaltered document than hacking up some poor strings for the mis-scaled, unidiomatic Swell 2' and "Larigot."  
(back) Subject: Personal Organ Crawl in Gainesville, Florida From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 21:18:48 -0500   I recently returned from a Florida vacation which included a meeting with Bruce Cornely, who was kind enough to set up some opportunities for me to see/hear/play some pipe organs in Gainesville. I thought I'd share a few impressions with you in the hopes that it would be of interest.   Please remember that while I am passionate about pipe organs, I am an amateur organist in the true sense of the word--I love playing, but I have not had much formal learning. I know a bit more about the mechanisms and the history, but I am not an expert.   We started at the First Baptist Church in Gainesville, where Bruce = presides over a 1975 Casavant of three manuals and about forty ranks. It is a = lovely instrument, and I can see why he enjoys it so much. It occupies a classic split chancel chamber arrangement, but has a good, warm sound--seems to = have missed the worst of the neobaroque era. In examining the chambers I was startled to note that every pipe in the organ is metal, save the pedal bourdon stop--which is solid oak! The organ is not overpowering, but certainly able to hold its own; the building is a bit dry, thanks to carpeting installed sometime after the organ itself. The Casavant turned out to be one of my two favorites of the day. Bruce loves to turn 4' = stops into 8' stops by playing an octave lower, and it gives him a whole realm = of sound possibilities that I wouldn't have imagined. He is quite creative = at the console.   Then Bruce was kind enough to walk me over to First Presbyterian where = Fisk Organs had been kind enough to put me in touch with Dr. Mark Coffey, organist at the lovely new Fisk, Opus #119, there. Dr. Coffee took me = into the sanctuary, and basically said, "Here it is. You can play for an hour = or so until a function is scheduled. I'll be around if you have any questions." This organ has generated wonderful reviews, and it is a very nice instrument, indeed. Three manual, tracker, fifty some ranks, = installed across the front of the sanctuary. It's not a huge space, but lots of = hard surfaces which gives the sound a nice bloom. The Fisk can whisper and the Fisk can roar.........whatever you wish! The tracker action was fine. I tried my best to see if I could alter the sound of the organ by pressing = the keys very slowly.......I couldn't make any noticeable difference, but perhaps some talented artists can. It was a bit of a difficult instrument to get used to. The drawknobs were in four terraces on each side of the keyboard, and I kept having to lean way over to read the stop names. = Also, the keys are shorter than standard size. Several times I was playing = along and suddenly the registration changed dramatically.......finally, I = realized that with the short keys my thumb had inadvertently hung over the edge of the key and fired a sensitive piston. Ouch! But I'm sure one would get used to it. Fisk is to be congratulated on a fine instrument, and First Presby for getting it! But I admit, for reasons I can't quite identify, I enjoyed the Casavant more.   Then it was on to lunch with Bruce. I'll give "Part Two" next time.   Dennis Steckley & A Six-Pack of Cats    
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #4449 - 04/22/04 From: "Christopher Howerter" <OrgelspielerKMD@msn.com> Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 22:17:48 -0400   What company built this "CUBE" organ?   Sincerely, Christopher J. Howerter, SPC Director of Music & Organist St. Paul's Lutheran Church Bethlehem, PA Cell: (610) 462-8017 Subject: great website From: <Gfc234@aol.com<mailto:Gfc234@aol.com>> Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 20:26:47 EDT   Just wanted to share a WONDERFUL website with everyone: http://orgel.com/home-e.html<http://orgel.com/home-e.html> Enjoy! gfc                     Gregory Ceurvorst M.M. Organ Performance Student Northwestern University Director of Music and Organist St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL 847.332.2788 home 708.243.2549 mobile  
(back) Subject: Barbara Owen From: "Richard Hazelip" <rhazelip1@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 20:44:11 -0700 (PDT)   Can someone provide me with email contact information for Barbara Owen? = Please reply offlist. Thanks!   Richard Hazelip also: musicman@quik.com.    
(back) Subject: Reverence in Worship From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 23:49:08 EDT   Dear Friends:   While browsing through sections of a website a church music colleague forwarded (see the URL at the bottom, if you wish), I saw one "link" which = lead to a page about "How can we begin our time of worship more reverently?"   I've copied a few of the suggestions that were listed (suggestions I feel which are actually usable without offending folks). Perhaps one of these = four can be of assistance in your church - if noise and clammer in your = sanctuary regularly precedes and diminishes the effective beginning of the time set = apart for worshipping GOD.   Blessings in your ministries, Dale Rider ____________________________________________________________   Do you use a statement in the beginning of your order of service bulletin that requests the congregation listen to the prelude?   1. The majority of solutions received follow variations of this sequence: a. a bell or chime brings the congregation out of their conversations. b. a minister welcomes the congregation and then there is a time for announcements. c. the minister then announces the beginning of worship, with an = invitation that it begin by reverently listening to the prelude.   2. We also tried all kinds of ways to diminish the pre-service talking and =   ave finally found the answer! The service begins informally. The pastor = walks to the front of the church, greets the congregation and then we share the = peace. The pastor then makes parish announcements. At the end of that, he says, = "Let us all be in silence before the Lord." ...and then the prelude begins. It = has made an incredible, positive change!   3. The most effective method I've seen is for the call to worship to occur =   before the prelude.   4. I have seen two tactics that have helped: a. Statements in the bulletin. My home church had the following: "God speaks to us before the service. We speak to God during the service. We speak to each other after the service."   b. Announcements first, then the statement "Let us now worship God," then the prelude. The congregation gets the impression that the service has begun.   Choral Resources    
(back) Subject: Re: Reverence in Worship From: "Sand Lawn" <glawn@jam.rr.com> Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 23:36:54 -0500   I begin my Preludes at 10:45 AM ..... the greeters in the Narthex make = an effort to keep the pre-service chat in the Narthex quiet ... as the = congregation enters the worship area they are quiet. The Minster then = gives the greetings and any announcements ending with "Now let us = worship". It has taken awhile for this to take shape, as this is a = Baptist church!   Sand Lawn =20 Northminster Church Monroe, LA        
(back) Subject: Re: Reverence in Worship From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Fri, 23 Apr 2004 01:07:39 EDT   Dale,   My Prelude begins early enough to see to it that it is finished before the =   Priest rings the bell. After the bell is rung, the congregation stands and = the introit or the processional hymn is sung as the Celebrant, Deacon, = Subdeacon, Thurifer and Crucifer process from the Narthex to the Chancel. There is no =   noise during the prelude, at least no noise I can hear from the gallery. = Most people are either praying or interested in hearing the prelude, which = mostly relates to the theme of the day or to a hymn to be sung, in parts, by = choir and congregation.   The Sacred Ministers depart during the postlude. The congregation stands = and bows to the Processional Cross. They then sit until the Postlude has concluded. I'm pretty careful to keep the Postlude interesting, but under = 5 minutes--usually. Afterwards, we have a lovely Coffee Hour, and on Feast = Days, Coffee Hour with Sherry.   To be fair to our Congregation, between the Processional Hymn and the Postlude, the Congregation chants a pointed Plainchant Psalm antiphonally = with the choir (with uncanny accuracy and NO VIBRATO from the ladies). They also = sing service music and hymns in parts. This they have done since at least 1910, = and the tradition has continued. What is really amazing is that the CHOIR is = silent during the Sermon. That is also an old tradition, though we no longer = server Sherry during the Sermon (as was done in earlier times).   Not to be cruel, but good Catholic worship (in this case Anglo-Catholic) = does much to foster not only quiet but prayer at appropriate times during a service. We belive that a rising tide lifts all boats. We also believe = that if something is above one's head, the best remedy is to raise one's head. = Civilized is as civilized does.   Pax Tecum, Bill H. SJE Boston.    
(back) Subject: Re: Reverence in Worship From: "Sand Lawn" <glawn@jam.rr.com> Date: Fri, 23 Apr 2004 00:24:07 -0500   Bravo, to Bill H.! That sounds like what this Baptist would love...   Sand My Prelude begins early enough to see to it that it is finished before = the Priest rings the bell. After the bell is rung, the congregation = stands and the introit or the processional hymn is sung as the = Celebrant, Deacon, Subdeacon, Thurifer and Crucifer process from the = Narthex to the Chancel. There is no noise during the prelude, at least = no noise I can hear from the gallery.   We belive that a rising tide lifts all boats. We also believe that if = something is above one's head, the best remedy is to raise one's head. = Civilized is as civilized does.   Pax Tecum, Bill H. SJE Boston.  
(back) Subject: Re: Reverence in Worship From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Fri, 23 Apr 2004 02:32:58 EDT   Sand,   Thanks. It shows how broadly the expression of "one, holy, catholic (universal) and apostolic church" can be cast like mustard seeds and yet = reaped one hundred fold.   Pax, 'BH