PipeChat Digest #4454 - Monday, April 26, 2004
 
[LONG] A few organs in the Ozark foothills and Delta plains, part 1 of 3
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Creston question
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Reverence in Worship
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Crowned Keys
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Footnote:  A few organs in the Ozark foothills and Delta plains, part  1 
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Crowned Keys
  by "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
Friedrich Reimerdes (1909-2000)
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
NAVY CHAPEL, WASHINGTON DC SKINNER ORGAN (x post)
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: NAVY CHAPEL, WASHINGTON DC SKINNER ORGAN (x post)
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
[LONG] A few organs in the Ozark foothills and Delta plains, part 2 of 3
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: NAVY CHAPEL, WASHINGTON DC SKINNER ORGAN (x post)
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: [LONG] A few organs in the Ozark foothills and Delta plains, part  2 
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: Creston question
  by "Richard Hazelip" <rhazelip1@yahoo.com>
Re: Creston question
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Creston question
  by "Richard Hazelip" <rhazelip1@yahoo.com>
RE:  Navy Chapel
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: [LONG] A few organs in the Ozark foothills and Delta plains, part 1 of 3 From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 2004 07:05:50 -0500   A few organs in the Ozark foothills and Delta plains Part 1 of 3     How was my organ crawl trip to Little Rock and Monroe? Let=92s see =96 = I had no sleep Thursday night and Friday, leaving home at 2:30 a.m. to make a 5:00 flight; in Little Rock I was locked out of my hotel room and missed dinner; I lost my way in downtown Little Rock (how does one do that?) and there were no police or natives who knew where Scott Street was and none of my maps indicated it; I lost my gas credit card in Monroe immediately after pumping gas; I got a $200 speeding ticket in Bastrop, Louisiana; and I flew home via Dallas/Fort Worth, where one has to take a bus across town (or so it seemed) to change flights. All in all, it was a great weekend.   This was a fateful trip even in the planning stages. After my fellow AGO traveling companions committed to go, I negotiated hotel prices, made reservations and prepared an itinerary. Then all of them backed out. Rick, who had declined the trip, was adamant that I would not drive alone for 9 hours, particularly through the state of Mississippi (I=92m still not sure what could happen to me there that couldn=92t = happen in Florida, Alabama, Louisiana or Arkansas). I started to cancel the whole thing, but something perverse in me (fueled no doubt by my constant combat in the courtroom lately) made me dogged in pursuit of the trip.=20   Therefore, the itinerary was modified, and again. The trip was cut short =96 instead of leaving Thursday and driving up, stopping in = Jackson to see the Quimby Baptist installation in progress, and leaving Monday to drop by Jackson and Hattiesburg and see a couple more organs, I cancelled the side trips and arranged a flight to Little Rock and a rental car to get me around and back and forth to Monroe.=20   Again I almost didn=92t make the trip, because one of the judges = scheduled two last-minute hearings, one on Thursday and one on Friday. When I objected, he replied nastily that he didn=92t care if I made it there to represent my client or not. I had to forego annual leave on Thursday for that hearing because I had a witness to testify (and I was given the opportunity to trip up a thoroughly obnoxious opponent, so it was a worthwhile cause), and left the Friday hearing in other hands. =20   Due to the excitement brought on by the events of the Thursday hearing, packing and the imminent trip, I attempted but slept not at all Thursday night. I had never flown at =93night=94 before, and saw the sun rise = from the plane landing in Atlanta. The plane from Atlanta ended up thirty minutes late, but I was unable to call ahead until we landed.   Rick had bet me I couldn=92t pack everything into a carryon, and I was determined to prove him wrong. Even though I won the bet, the bag got gate-checked at each stop. Go figure. I left the laptop at home, opting for ten pounds of music instead, mostly copies of the 50 pounds of books I might normally carry.   As I headed out of the airport to collect the rental car, adrenaline assisted by having ingested two frappucinos and two fully-leaded Cokes, I heard someone shouting my name. David Scribner was riding around in his pickup truck looking for me. Moments later I was following him out, where we dropped my car off at his house and continued to Conway, Arkansas, to see the Nichols & Simpson organ installed at Greene Chapel, Hendrix College. Travis Evans, fellow list member and organist of a Lutheran church in the St. Louis area, joined us, having arrived the day before. =20   Somehow I had forgotten that David drives like a bat out of hell (and this from one investing heavily in cloaking devices to keep the cops off me), and the trip reminded me of the car trip several years ago, with Father Fowler driving, to Hyde Park, New York, in the middle of a flood brought on by a hurricane. My philosophy: hang on tight and pretend it is a rollercoaster at Hershey Park.   Anyway, back to Greene Chapel, where we arrived unharmed. The room was austere except for the =93front=94 or main altar area, where there was = an arched stained-glass window flanked by organ chambers. The stationary console was on the left under a facade. The organ was 2-manual with 27 stops, 33 ranks, some of these being from the Kimball replaced by Nichols & Simpson. I had heard a recording of this instrument, but it was even more pleasing in person. Travis tried out some Vaughan Williams and Bach. I have no idea what I played, maybe some Arne and Elgar and Bach. I had hoped to get more practice and polish in, but didn=92t count on a plethora of Sunday gigs just before the trip, and = was not about to express my Easter joy at being at some great organs with Lenten and Holy Week music.   We got to spend only about 30-40 minutes at the console before being whisked away back to Little Rock, to the Nichols & Simpson shop where Joe Nichols gave us a grand tour. I wished Rick had been there to appreciate the woodworking detail. Joe was fascinating, displaying his knowledge of other organbuilders=92 schools of thought, showing his designs and explaining his own theories, particularly of successful scaling, and drawing a picture of how the whole process came together. He and Wayne are meticulous, coming up with detailing, aesthetic as well as functional, not seen on many other organs. Jorge was the master woodworker and carver, and I was impressed with silky smooth finishes applied to the hand-sanded and rubbed wood. I was too interested to take pictures, a fact about which Rick later reprimanded me (of course, he had other things about which to take me to task, which we shall get to in due course).   Wayne came in, very gracious but reticent. I kept seeing the others exchanging meaningful glances and talking in hushed tones. Then I found out he was in mourning for the passing of a pet raccoon. I understood immediately; I still don=92t visit fearless Bubba=92s grave. I made an offer to Joe to ship Wayne the erstwhile possum from my farm (all he needs is dry cat food and love), but Joe didn=92t think that very wise.   From there we stopped at a swank Community Bakery for a quick bite and sugar fix. Then armed with a greater appreciation of the organs we were visiting, we sojourned to Pulaski Heights United Methodist Church. This housed a Nichols & Simpson 3-manual organ with antiphonal, 56 stops and 73 ranks, and moveable console. The organ replaced (and incorporated some pipes from) a Schantz. There was organ everywhere, and plenty of beautiful flamed fa=E7ade pipes to die for. This organ exhibited plenty of colours in every sense of the word, and complemented the beautifully stained glass windows with their latticed tracery. The music desk was veneered in a beautiful wood, which we found out was eucalyptus. Here I do not remember what either of us played, because I was too amazed at the amount of organ from which to choose, but I know it was big. We also met Jim Maase, the music director and a very friendly guy.   We could have spent the rest of the day right there, but no =96 we were rushed off to pick up Ken Cowan and visit the Cathedral of St. Andrew. A three manual with solo division perched in the gallery, with 49 stops and 66 ranks. At this point I chickened out of playing, but Travis, the choirmaster Phil Bordeleau and Ken all experimented. Travis did some St. Anne and the Thalben-Ball Elegy for us, and seemed very comfortable with choosing and changing registration, which he did very well. Ken played a transcription of the overture from the opera =91Oberon=92, I believe. The ceilings were stenciled in a grid-like pattern, which continued on the face of the arches. There was a nice reverberation in the room.   Reluctantly we dropped Ken off to get ready for the recital, and stopped by David=92s house, where I met fellow list member Sand Lawn for the = first time. Then it was on to my hotel for a quick shower before dinner. Here was where it got dicey. Upon checking in, I realized that I was dehydrated and decided on some ice. However, my key would not grant me access back into my room. I tried and tried, and finally made it down from the sixth floor to the lobby, barefoot and carrying a tub of ice, and waited in line to inform staff (in the middle of hosting a AFL-CIO convention and book fair with Grisham and Angelou) of the dilemma.   After several fruitless trips upstairs and attempts, I was finally let in the room with a master key, but had to wait for maintenance to fix the door. By now it was close to 5:30, when dinner was scheduled. After waiting fifteen minutes, I got into the shower. A maintenance man did not show up until about 6:15. I finished dressing and left the hotel around 6:30, hunting for Christ Church. I had missed Joe=92s home-smoked ribs by now, and the new challenge was finding the church. Steeples would appear, only to disappear into thin air two blocks later. Knowing I was very close but not finding Scott Street, I stopped at the Radisson to ask directions. I met two security guards inside and asked them if they could direct me to Christ Church or Scott Street. They informed me that they weren=92t from Little Rock and couldn=92t help me. Undaunted, I went to the front desk, where the manager was also clueless, but found me a map with Scott Street listed. I was about three blocks away! Either there are no natives left, or no one wants to admit being a native.   Stay tuned.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Re: Creston question From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 2004 09:26:56 -0400   On 4/24/04 10:39 PM, "Richard Hazelip" <rhazelip1@yahoo.com> wrote:   > Who serviced the Kilgen organ before it was replaced by an electronic > substitute some time shortly after Creston left the church?   Richard, I wonder whether that might be the New Jersey firm (well known) with a name something like =B3Palomino=B2. I think they=B9re big on NYC organs, especially Kilgens. I know my clue is ridiculous, but somebody will know the name, even from that. They do St. Patrick=B9s, among others.   Another who might know is Albert =B3Biff=B2 Butler II, who I believe is now in San Diego. Servicing the Spreckles? He used to do significant work in RC churches in Manhattan. He MAY even be the guy you=B9re looking for.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Reverence in Worship From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 2004 09:28:19 -0400   Hi Dale, Sounds a bit like Forest Gump's Mama talking, amd look how successful he was. I think the first metaphor has to do with his shrimp boat, the second reminds him to climb the mast to find the shrimp, and the third has something to do with a box of chocolates (but I could be wrong on all counts). Metaphysically Mike   ProOrgo53@aol.com wrote:   > In a message dated 4/23/2004 12:24:48 AM Central > Daylight Time, glawn@jam.rr.com writes: > > > We belive that a rising tide lifts all > boats. We also believe that if something is > above one's head, the best remedy is to > raise one's head. Civilized is as civilized > does. > > Will someone please explain this > metaphysical/metaphorical jargon in light of the > subject being discussed. Thank you. Ignorant in > IndependenceDale Rider    
(back) Subject: Crowned Keys From: "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 2004 13:41:41 -0500   Alan......the crown to the keyboard is from bass to treble...........as you stand back and look at the entire keyboard, there is a very slight upward bow in the middle. I have seen this on some organs, and read of it being recommended, but some of our builders or more expert organ people will have to comment on it. In theory, it should make playing a tiny bit more comfortable toward the ends of the keyboard, allowing the arms to drop down naturally.   As for the upside down notched v-shape keys, I've seen them on pictures of a number of trackers. I don't know how commonly it is done or why, but it looks attractive. Perhaps in theory this would make the wood more stable in shape............I dunno? I've played the Taylor & Boody in Vincennes, IN (Opus 4, I believe), but I don't recall what the keys look like.   Dennis Steckley   Ain't No Tagline Here!        
(back) Subject: Footnote: A few organs in the Ozark foothills and Delta plains, part 1 of 3 From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 2004 13:36:03 -0500   Thanks, David. Sorry, but understandable in that I didn't play it and can't count.   More information about the Nichols & Simpson organs and links to stoplists and pxes can be found at:   http://www.nicholsandsimpson.com/products.htm   Cheers.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com (who just got back from a service and baptism at a 1928 prayer book church - getting mighty cosmopolitan lately)     -----Original Message----- From: David Scribner [mailto:david@blackiris.com] Sent: Sunday, April 25, 2004 7:40 AM To: Glenda   One mistake - St. Andrew's is a 4 manual not 3   David      
(back) Subject: Re: Crowned Keys From: "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 2004 15:02:20 -0400     On Sun, 25 Apr 2004 13:41:41 -0500 "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net> writes: > Alan......the crown to the keyboard is from bass to > treble...........as you stand back and look at the entire keyboard, there is a very > slightupward bow in the middle. I have seen this on some organs, and read > of it being recommended, but some of our builders or more expert organ > people will have to comment on it. In theory, it should make > playing tiny bit more comfortable toward the ends of the keyboard, allowing > the arms to drop down naturally.     The majority of the "crowned" keyboards I have seen, got that way by wear and tear. The middle keys are used more than the extremeties, so the thumper or stopper felts compress more.       Jim  
(back) Subject: Friedrich Reimerdes (1909-2000) From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 2004 15:22:55 -0500   For my prelude today I played a very genial Neobaroque work by Reimerdes: Easter (Ostern) Prelude and Fugue in D, which is from his Pr=E4ludien und Fugen f=FCr Orgel, Heft II der Orgelwerke, Carus-Verlag CV 18.050, =A9 19= 96. I'm curious if anyone else plays any of his organ pieces and if anyone has recommendations about his many volumes of organ works based on chorales f= or various seasons of the liturgical year.   Thanks, Robert Lind    
(back) Subject: NAVY CHAPEL, WASHINGTON DC SKINNER ORGAN (x post) From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 2004 20:10:28 EDT   Does anyone have a spec on the Navy Chapel (formerly Mt. Vernon Seminary Chapel) 1925 E.M Skinner organ? I know it is 20 ranks on three manuals, = but am interested in what it contains.   Any assistance will be greatly appreciated. Thanks!   -Scott   Scott F. Foppiano Cantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat.    
(back) Subject: Re: NAVY CHAPEL, WASHINGTON DC SKINNER ORGAN (x post) From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 2004 21:12:30 -0400   On 4/25/04 8:10 PM, "ScottFop@aol.com" <ScottFop@aol.com> wrote:   > Does anyone have a spec on the Navy Chapel (formerly Mt. Vernon Seminary > Chapel)   Not important at all, Scott. But just curious. Where is THIS chapel? Whose seminary is/was that?   Alan (wishing he could help with your question, but cannot)    
(back) Subject: [LONG] A few organs in the Ozark foothills and Delta plains, part 2 of 3 From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 2004 19:59:48 -0500   A few organs in the Ozark foothills and Delta plains Part 2 of 3   There were so many things I resolved to tell you about the organs I visited, but now, a week later, they come to me in patches, in the shower, in dreams, during court. Things like mitred feet, where the springs are located under the keys to give it a nice touch, pretty rosewood notes, music desk extenders, apparatii to prevent lights and guts of the organ from showing through, little advances in the action to keep the organ more efficient and maintenance free. However, I also didn't want this to become five parts instead of three!   Anyway, hurriedly choking down a McDonald=92s cheeseburger in = frustration, I made it to Christ Church in time for Ken Cowan=92s recital. The program:   Chorale in E major =96 Franck Scherzo, from Symphony No. 6 =96 Vierne Clair de lune, from Pieces de Fantasie =96 Vierne Chromatic Fantasy and Fugue =96 Bach/Reger   Intermission   Valse Mignonne =96 Karg-Elert Sonata on the 94th Psalm =96 Reubke   I swore he did an encore and I recognized and wrote it down, but I = can=92t read my writing and find it. One would think I just turned into a doctor with a scrawl like that. The organ was a 3-manual with 62 ranks, 46 stops, moveable console. =20   The Franck was the most beautiful and melodious I think I=92ve ever = heard it played. The performance was partly the result of instrument and partly the mastery of the performer. Ken played the entire program from memory, and was certainly at home with the instrument. The scary part was not as scary as I=92ve heard it, and the sforzando not so loud, but instead a building of buttery layers to a mighty roar.   I had heard Cowan only in recording, but found that he is, as are most performers, even better in person. The Vierne was as smooth, polished and musical as one could wish, and there was no wasted movement. He knew exactly the dynamic he wanted =96 it was interesting to see what he did with the expression pedals, moving them ever so slightly at times. The Reger transcription was a masterpiece in pedalwork alone, smooth and flawless.   Cowan must really like Karg-Elert =96 my first hearing of the =93Jesu, = mein Freud=94 (if my spelling is correct) was from a recording by him. My notes of this selection read, if I am correct in deciphering, =93this is actually lovely, shimmering like chartreuse silk.=94 All my chartreuse = is linen, not silk (including a brand new suit that requires those around me to wear sunshades - wait a minute - there was that lime green pantsuit in silk that I really didn't like that much; nevertheless), but the description has to evoke an image for the reader of something blindingly smooth, like a pineapple milkshake without the lumps or a pina colada. Anyway, I was aware that only two short hours before I was seething, standing outside my room with only an ice bucket, and forgetting everything about the last few hours except my brand-new resolution never to leave home again. But suddenly my mood lifted and again I felt the 700-mile trip was worth it all to hear a truly superlative performer in flawless recital.   All this was before the Reubke. I had heard Reubke several times the previous summer, but Ken made this instrument sing and constantly change colors. Reubke loomed as big and beautiful as I would ever want to hear it, Ken constantly and confidently tweaking the registration without losing any musicality. This is what I expect at a recital =96 someone playing music I can=92t with impeccable precision and musicality, making even the most obscure selections come alive, with great attention to detail.   We spent a short time at the reception, then adjourned to Wayne=92s home for a full-blown post-recital repast of leftover ribs (thank God Joe smoked enough for an army, so I got ribs after all), with trimmings. The place was filled with interesting and friendly people, all of whom apparently knew where Scott Street was. I wished I had met them before the recital.   Wayne sang, Sand played piano, Joe and I swapped war stories and entertained the rib-eaters. Several hours, a few ribs (as an attorney I couldn=92t count the number!) and a gallon of iced water later, I reluctantly took my leave and found my way back to my hotel without incident. It was way past midnight.   The next morning found me back at the Community Bakery, where I partook of an almond bowtie and piece of baklava for breakfast. I impulsively bought a couple more boxed up for breakfast the next day. Little did I know what a providential move that would be.   Travis and I got a chance to explore the organ at Christ Church for about an hour. He played a lovely arrangement by Noel Rawsthorne of Londonderry Air. I massacred some Pierne, Chuckerbutty and somebody else, before I had to take off driving to Monroe, Louisiana, to meet Sand Lawn at his church, Northminster Baptist Church. I made excellent time, driving through the delta plains in a little over 2 =BD hours. However, before I reached Monroe, I was struck with the isolation of the area =96 only one community boasted a McDonalds, and there was little in the way of gas stations, fast food or other restaurants. Before I made it to Monroe I had eaten one of my pastries in desperation.   I met Sand at his church, and had about ten or fifteen minutes at the console of the small but fine Moller. The building was nicely appointed, and the organ sounded very good in the acoustic. I didn=92t feel guilty playing the Little Fugue in G minor here. The action was extremely stiff - I think I could grow to like that. All too soon we had to leave for our appointment at First Presbyterian Church.   We met Charles Eve, the music director and retired professor from the University of Louisiana Monroe, and was able to see, hear and play the Dan Garland 3-manual, 70-rank organ. The room is slightly contemporary, but one of the most impressive features is the row of wooden screens on each side of the room separating an apse or ambulatory on each side of the room. It was amazing to realize how much organ had been squeezed into a narrow chamber area behind the choir.   I was given more of an opportunity to play this organ than any of the others, and it was fun. I was left alone for about 30-40 minutes with it, and it was still not enough to sample the sounds. =20   Afterward Sand took me on a tour of the town, and later that evening we had dinner at a local establishment, great dead fish and my only glass of wine this trip. Then I was delivered back to my hotel, with its clean smell and comfortable bed and pillows. I was out like a light.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Re: NAVY CHAPEL, WASHINGTON DC SKINNER ORGAN (x post) From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 2004 21:23:01 EDT   I am not sure, someone told me of the organ jus this morning, which I had never heard of, and I did discover through my EM Skinner/Aeolian-Skinner = opus list book that the current "Navy Chapel" was the former Mt. Vernon = Seminary Chapel, as PART of the Mt. Vernon seminary, which is now obviously defunct = (?).   Scott F. Foppiano Cantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat.    
(back) Subject: Re: [LONG] A few organs in the Ozark foothills and Delta plains, part 2 of 3 From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 2004 21:26:58 -0500   At 7:59 PM -0500 04/25/04, Glenda wrote: >I swore he did an encore and I recognized and wrote it down, but I can=92t >read my writing and find it. One would think I just turned into a >doctor with a scrawl like that.   Mulet - Tu Es Preta  
(back) Subject: Re: Creston question From: "Richard Hazelip" <rhazelip1@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 2004 19:31:40 -0700 (PDT)   Thanks so much for your information. I will check into it as soon as = possible! Richard Hazelip   Alan Freed <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> wrote: On 4/24/04 10:39 PM, "Richard Hazelip" <rhazelip1@yahoo.com> wrote:   Who serviced the Kilgen organ before it was replaced by an electronic = substitute some time shortly after Creston left the church?   Richard, I wonder whether that might be the New Jersey firm (well known) = with a name something like =93Palomino=94. I think they=92re big on NYC = organs, especially Kilgens. I know my clue is ridiculous, but somebody = will know the name, even from that. They do St. Patrick=92s, among = others.   Another who might know is Albert =93Biff=94 Butler II, who I believe is = now in San Diego. Servicing the Spreckles? He used to do significant = work in RC churches in Manhattan. He MAY even be the guy you=92re looking = for.   Alan  
(back) Subject: Re: Creston question From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 2004 22:37:20 EDT   Dear Richard:   IIRC Alan might have ment the Paragallo firm in NJ.   Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: Re: Creston question From: "Richard Hazelip" <rhazelip1@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 2004 19:58:36 -0700 (PDT)   Thanks! I just wrote them. Will see what develops. Richard Hazelip   RonSeverin@aol.com wrote: Dear Richard: IIRC Alan might have ment the Paragallo firm in NJ. Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: RE: Navy Chapel From: <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2004 01:15:46 EDT   I searched for a while, and couldn't come up with a website that really mentions the organ. It's a 3 manual Skinner. This is the best I found - = at least it has contact info:   Navy Chapel at Nebraska Avenue: NDW Treasure   The Mount Vernon Seminary was an elite woman's college. During WW2, the campus was purchased by the Navy. The college moved within DC, became = Mount Vernon Junior College, and is now part of George Washington University.   Victoria