PipeChat Digest #4663 - Monday, August 2, 2004
 
Re: Organists Declining and the School Programs...Starting a movement?
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Transnational organists
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: Good Pentecost music for church organist audition
  by <Markhedm@cs.com>
Re: Good Pentecost music for church organist audition
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Good Pentecost music for church organist audition
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: Transnational organists
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: Transnational organists
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
church music degrees
  by "terry hicks" <Terrick@webtv.net>
Re: church music degrees
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Transnational organists
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Is it slow around here . . .
  by <OMusic@aol.com>
Re: Good Pentecost music for church organist audition
  by "Raymond H. Clark" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Transnational organists
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Good Pentecost music for church organist audition
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re:why there are no organists
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: Transnational organists
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
RE: Transnational organists
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Practical church music
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
RE: Transnational organists
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Transnational organists
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Organists Declining and the School Programs...Starting a movement? From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Mon, 2 Aug 2004 15:09:37 EDT   In a message dated 8/2/2004 1:33:44 PM Central Daylight Time, nicemusica@yahoo.com writes:   Arie V and Andrew Mead had some very good points and thanks so much for them. I was on the phone last night with two of my friends/colleagues who are listers there, and we were also all online chatting together about stuff. = One thing that really sets me off is this: The university programs, for the = most part, are not offering sturdy course work for us which the churches seem = to need. Westminster Choir College, the University of Kansas and a few other = schools are the only places that offer Sacred Music study where the course work = is intense. The University of Washington at Seattle, while not having a = Church Music degree still has a way where a Sacred Music degree can be = "fashioned" with adding about 9 hours of classes in Church Music to a BA Degree, = taught by Mel Butler. My beef with the schools that dont do this: they are taking all of our = money and not teaching us the basics that we need to know. Every decent paying = job on the AGO website now has a requirement for things like STRONG choral conducting, RSCM expertise, very keen skills in Business Administration, = etc. Few colleges that I have seen have anything where the Organ major is REQUIRED = to take intense courses in Choral Conducting and literature, childrens music, = handbells, a sacred music education class or two, etc. The schools = really need to encourage their organ departments to add Sacred Music components, = if not degree plans to offer us what we need to know. And stop bi***ing about who's going to teach what. I remember at one = school where I took some studies, the Handbell choir director got into a tiff = about not wanting to teach handbell methods to the Church Music majors. After 3 =   weeks of classes, we still did not have an agreement, so they stopped it = for a semester. Another of my colleages said he asked a prominent Episcopal = Church musician to teach him how to work in an RSCM frame, and that musician = refused. After the close of the Northwestern University Organ department, I = encourage us in the field to REALLY get serious about this issue. The only thing churches are doing is sitting, reading newspaper articles, and saying = very blacnd statements such as "Its sad that the organ schools are closing." Yet THE CHURCHES are not doing ANYTHING about it. They won't step up and say to = the schools, the AGO, the NPM, NASM to please think about what they are doing. = If they don;t say something and become more aggressive, then they will have = to start with the drums and cymbals...and NOT in a Karg Elert fashion. Search = committees at churches are made up of too many different people who are = insecure as to where they want the church to go. Like I said...the church itself is making us uninterested inworking for them.     Desiree: I agree with you on most of these points. HOWEVER-a musical education = for a good student-who is a good musician-and has good ears-should enable him to = learn how to direct a handbell group, learn anglican chant, or work out of = some RSCM style program IN A REALLY SHORT AMOUNT OF TIME. There is only = so much a school can teach. I'm sorry-but if you can play and understand a 4 = voice Bach fugue-you CAN conduct a choir. Bud Wrote: "I can't think of ANY other profession requiring a similar amount of education and training that would put up with such conditions." Well -I can't think of any other profession that is so unwilling to train =   new employees-with advanced degrees! Name another profession that doesn't = start their new employees with one or two weeks of PAID training... = I've found that the Catholic and Episcopal denominations are the worst- they = frequently ask for applicants with 5 or more years of experience in the denomination-then tell applicants that there are 7 weekend liturgies, 5 = choirs, and 12 meetings weekly-and the salary is 30k per year, with one week of vacation = after two years. It's like there's a caste system in place-one where you can't = break into a higher level. GRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR Perhaps this era can be compared with the decline of quality in church music during the end French Classical period (grin). The storm pieces = have been replaced by guitars and drums. HAHAHAHA   We just have to tell ourselves that everything will work out now-maybe we =   need to start playing Boely every week. On second thought-perhaps an independent group-upset pipechatters-can = start to author letters to the heads of all major denominations stating their concerns about unfair employment practices.-because the AGO obviously = will not do it. gfc ___________________________________________________________________________= ___ _________ _______________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ _______________________________ ________________ Gregory Francis Ceurvorst 1921 Sherman Avenue # GS Evanston, IL 60201 847.332.2788 home/fax 708.243.2549 mobile _Home Email: gfc234@aol.com_ (mailto:gfc234@aol.com) _Mobile Email: gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net_ (mailto:gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net)    
(back) Subject: Re: Transnational organists From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 2 Aug 2004 12:23:15 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   I was once an applicant for a Norwegian position, and was offered it in some far-flung corner of Telemark. In the end, I gave back-word and declined the position, but I have often wondered whether I should have been a little more adventurous and gone there.   I think it was the cost of steak which put me off, and the idea of seeing dead reindeer at the butcher's shop. Roast reindeer and Yorkshire Pudding doesn't have quite the same quality, I feel sure.......like a Harmonic Flute on a Baroque instrument I expect.   The language I could doubtless have learned, and I like snow, ice, slippery roads and huge drops into fjords a mile below.   Don't believe the Norwegians when they tell you it has mountains! Look at it from a satellite photograph, and it is as flat as a board. Something to do with it being an indented penoplane....land that rose up and got eroded by glaciers.....not a real mountain in sight.   Also, the Norwegians can never get more than "nil pointe" in the Eurovision Song Contest; and this from a country which gave us Grieg!!!!!!!     Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK         --- Jarle Fagerheim <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:   > Not quite sure about that. Yes, there are many > British organists here, > but 50 % sounds like an exaggeration to me. I > believe 20 % would be a > better estimate     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - You care about security. So do we. http://promotions.yahoo.com/new_mail  
(back) Subject: RE: Good Pentecost music for church organist audition From: <Markhedm@cs.com> Date: Mon, 2 Aug 2004 15:58:30 EDT   To all on the list:   I have an audition/interview for a organist/director position at a = Lutheran church scheduled next week. The search committee is requesting what = amounts to an entire service - prelude, offertory, postlude, Setting II of the = liturgy, three hymns, rehearse a choir anthem, as though it were Pentecost Sunday. =   They gave me the texts for that day. Does anyone have any suggestions for =   Pentecost music? I was going to play the Widor Toccata in F before I knew = this, but I might go ahead and play it anyway, I don't think it is inappropriate for =   Pentecost. I have to admit that I don't keep Pentecost music current in = my repertoire. I know "Nun Bitten Wir" by Buxtehude, but I wonder if this is = too easy for an audition. I know "Komm, Heiliger Geist, Herre Gott" by Zachau. Thanks.   Mark  
(back) Subject: Re: Good Pentecost music for church organist audition From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 02 Aug 2004 16:12:50 -0400   on 8/2/04 3:58 PM, Markhedm@cs.com at Markhedm@cs.com wrote:   To all on the list:   I have an audition/interview for a organist/director position at a = Lutheran church scheduled next week. The search committee is requesting what = amounts to an entire service - prelude, offertory, postlude, Setting II of the liturgy, three hymns, rehearse a choir anthem, as though it were = Pentecost Sunday. They gave me the texts for that day. Does anyone have any suggestions for Pentecost music? I was going to play the Widor Toccata in = F before I knew this, but I might go ahead and play it anyway, I don't think it is inappropriate for Pentecost. I have to admit that I don't keep Pentecost music current in my repertoire. I know "Nun Bitten Wir" by Buxtehude, but I wonder if this is too easy for an audition. I know = "Komm, Heiliger Geist, Herre Gott" by Zachau. Thanks.   Mark   I'd suggest Bach's Komm, Heiliger Geist, BWV 651. An exhilarating piece.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: Good Pentecost music for church organist audition From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Mon, 2 Aug 2004 16:36:30 EDT   Well, if you are up for a challenge, and can find the music (and you are a =   good sight-reader or quick-study) why not go more modern with Larry King's =   Fanfare to the Tongues of Fire. That is IF the organ is up to the = task...just a thought.   Rick in VA  
(back) Subject: Re: Transnational organists From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Mon, 2 Aug 2004 15:49:10 -0500     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, August 02, 2004 2:23 PM Subject: Re: Transnational organists     > Also, the Norwegians can never get more than "nil > pointe" in the Eurovision Song Contest; and this from > a country which gave us Grieg!!!!!!!   But don't forget that Grieg was of Scottish descent. His father, = Alexander Grieg, was the British Consul in Bergen.   John Speller      
(back) Subject: Re: Transnational organists From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 02 Aug 2004 16:51:16 -0400   On 8/2/04 3:23 PM, "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:   > I gave back-word and declined the position, but I have often wondered = whether > I should have been a little more adventurous and gone there.   That IS a good story (or several).   As for a real reply, I'll leave that up to Jarle! HE can handle the likes of you!   But Telemark is not an easy commute from Amsterdam!   Alan    
(back) Subject: church music degrees From: "terry hicks" <Terrick@webtv.net> Date: Mon, 2 Aug 2004 13:52:22 -0700   Besides some of the obvious courses that should be taught, there are also some it would be wise to include: - working with software for music writing - skills for interacting with people - conflict management - financial management of music program - working with "contemporary Christian music"    
(back) Subject: Re: church music degrees From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Mon, 2 Aug 2004 17:01:00 EDT   In a message dated 8/2/2004 3:53:56 PM Central Daylight Time, Terrick@webtv.net writes:   Besides some of the obvious courses that should be taught, there are also some it would be wise to include: - working with software for music writing - skills for interacting with people - conflict management - financial management of music program - working with "contemporary Christian music"       All of these issues were covered at Northwestern-except for the software part. gfc ___________________________________________________________________________= ___ _________ _______________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ _______________________________ ________________ Gregory Francis Ceurvorst 1921 Sherman Avenue # GS Evanston, IL 60201 847.332.2788 home/fax 708.243.2549 mobile _Home Email: gfc234@aol.com_ (mailto:gfc234@aol.com) _Mobile Email: gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net_ (mailto:gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net)    
(back) Subject: Re: Transnational organists From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 02 Aug 2004 17:07:19 -0400   On 8/2/04 3:23 PM, "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:   > I think it was the cost of steak [that] put me off, and the idea of = seeing > dead reindeer at the butcher's shop.   Oh, but reindeer chops are FINE!   > Roast reindeer and Yorkshire Pudding doesn't have quite the same = quality, I > feel sure.......like a Harmonic Flute on a Baroque instrument I expect. > THERE I have to agree with you. It just doesn't work!   Alan  
(back) Subject: Re: Is it slow around here . . . From: <OMusic@aol.com> Date: Mon, 2 Aug 2004 17:16:57 EDT   Keith improvised a beautiful prelude Sunday morning in the style of = Franck. He had many compliments from the congregation, median age about 55, who appreciates the classics. A former music director was sure he had heard = it before and wanted to know what it was. I did an offertory medley of hymns on = Faith. We had a visiting music director who sang and played in a western style = for the special music. I did a Robert McDonald arrangement for the Postlude. =   Having been quite ill for about a month, practicing has been down. I = awakened Saturday morning feeling like a new person. I pray it lasts. I have more = energy than I have had in years. Thanks everyone for your prayers and support. = Lee  
(back) Subject: Re: Good Pentecost music for church organist audition From: "Raymond H. Clark" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 02 Aug 2004 14:21:59 -0700       Markhedm@cs.com wrote:   > To all on the list: > > I have an audition/interview for a organist/director position at a > Lutheran church scheduled next week. The search committee is requesting > what amounts to an entire service - prelude, offertory, postlude, > Setting II of the liturgy, three hymns, rehearse a choir anthem, as > though it were Pentecost Sunday. They gave me the texts for that day. > Does anyone have any suggestions for Pentecost music? I was going to > play the Widor Toccata in F before I knew this, but I might go ahead and =   > play it anyway, I don't think it is inappropriate for Pentecost. I have =   > to admit that I don't keep Pentecost music current in my repertoire. I > know "Nun Bitten Wir" by Buxtehude, but I wonder if this is too easy for =   > an audition. I know "Komm, Heiliger Geist, Herre Gott" by Zachau. > Thanks. > > Mark   OOPS! If they're good German Lutherans, they're going to expect "Come Holy Ghost, God and Lord" (Buxtehude), "Kyrie, God, Holy Ghost, Eleison" (Bach, Clavieruebung III) and "Come God, Creator, Holy Ghost" (Bach, Great Eighteen), but you're not going to learn THOSE in a week (chuckle).   They stayed in my repertoire because we had ordinations twice a year = (grin).   Um ... there was an easy, trashy, fun Fantasy on "Come, Thou Holy Spirit, Come (Veni Sancte Spiritus, the chant Sequence) in Seven (?) Preludes on Plainsong Hymns by Van Hulse.   Beyond that, there's the the Pentecost volume of Tournemire's L'Orgue Mystique, Messiaen's Messe de la Pentecote, de Grigny's Veni Creator, etc.   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: Transnational organists From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 2 Aug 2004 14:34:15 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Well it just shows!   I have this absurd image of a kilted Norwegian playing bag-pipes whilst ski-ing down a mountain.   Anyway, we must be kind to Norway.....lovely country, and they send us a wonderful Christmas tree every year, which is erected in Trafalgar Square, London.   I wonder if Jarle has heard the organ at Trondheim Cathedral. It is reputed to be a very fine instrument.   I feel sure there must be others around Oslo, Bergen Stavanger which we do not know about.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> wrote:   > ...........Grieg was of Scottish descent. > His father, Alexander > Grieg, was the British Consul in Bergen. > > John Speller >       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? New and Improved Yahoo! Mail - Send 10MB messages! http://promotions.yahoo.com/new_mail  
(back) Subject: Re: Good Pentecost music for church organist audition From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 02 Aug 2004 17:55:01 -0400   On 8/2/04 3:58 PM, "Markhedm@cs.com" <Markhedm@cs.com> wrote:     Mark: We must talk. On list or off. Time is short. Give me more info. Sounds like an ELCA parish. But tell me more about IT! I=B9m writing on Monday evening, and will commence a reply in the morning, with suggestions. You=B9re certainly off to a good start. Tell me MORE about the parish, its tradition, the pastor, and all that.   The instrument? Your specific duties? The choir, if any? Where? Local standards? The more we know, the more we can help!   Alan Freed www.stlukesnyc.org      
(back) Subject: Re:why there are no organists From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Mon, 2 Aug 2004 17:55:40 EDT   >There's no future; there's no job security; there's no health insurance >(for the most part); there are no retirement benefits (for the most >part); churches are exempt from paying into State Disability Insurance >and unemployment insurance (a few CHOOSE to do so); many still try to >(illegally) pay their musicians as independent contractors to avoid >paying their share of Social Security taxes, and thereby create a >heavier tax burden for the musician.   I don't know if the above quote refers to full or part-time church work. =   When I was in full-time church work, I had good health insurance, life insurance coverage, a retirement plan and the non-profit organization's = equivalent of a 401K (I forget what the numbers are). The church also paid Social Security, and I had education benefits, book allowances, etc. When I = left, I chose to take the money out of the retirement plan and invest it in my own = plan, since I couldn't put any more money into it through the church. Now that I'm working part time at a church, I don't get insurance = benefits, but the church pays Social Security and taxes, etc., as well as all my professional memberships, and I have education benefits for conferences = and and allowance for music/book purchases. I wouldn't work for a church that didn't give me at least basic benefits. = If they tried to get away with not paying taxes but wanted me as a = regular employee, I'd tell them that I could do the same job as a free-lance = musician without the headache of weekly church work, and probably make more money = doing it. At least in this area, GOOD substitute church organists are a hot commodity and can command premium fees. There were some months when I = was doing free lance work that I made more money playing for a couple of churches = and a wedding or two than I did working 40 hour weeks at the funeral home--and = it was much easier work. Granted, I had to pay taxes on it, but by the time = I had my accountant deduct things like gas, mileage, music purchases, etc., I = came out ok. Anyway, as a permanent church employee, even if it's part-time, a church needs to pay basic benefits of Social Security and payroll taxes, and it's = always a nice bonus if they'll pay for things like AGO membership, a = conference or two and some music purchases. If a person is full time, there is no = reason that insurance, retirement, etc. shouldn't be part of the package. As for career advancement, I think there's plenty of job opportunities, = but people get locked into niches--they get known for only being Baptist or Lutheran or Episcopalian musicians. In a local church, there isn't much opportunity to grow, unless a church = is a new congregation or the music program needs to be revitalized. The opportunities come when a person is willing to relocate and move to a = larger church and put their "touch" on a music program and bring it to a higher level. =   However, many people get caught up in doing music for their own glory and = not doing it for the glory of God...and in my opinion, that's where the = problem lies. Churches can tell when a person is a diva and are only looking to = advance themselves instead of looking to advance the programs of the church. I had a long conversation with one of my friends about this subject last week. We were discussing people who are in church music because it's an = easy platform for self-stardom and they do it because they can be the star = during the service vs. those who are involved in music because they want to help =   others worship. The musical styles and how the two types of musicians = lead are very different and congregations can tell who is out to be the center of attention and who is there to glorify God and uplift the congregation. = Some people don't advance to bigger careers because God wants them to stay in their church because they are needed to help their people worship--they are = ministering where they need to be. Others don't get advanced to bigger positions because they would use the job as a source of vanity. Well, I've migrated way off topic here, but churches need to be educated about benefits for their employees and musicians need to be careful about = how we use the gifts we have been given. Sometimes the attitude that a musician =   comes in with turns off the church to any possibility of negotiation = because of the "I'm wonderful, you will give me what I tell you to pay me" attitude. = It's no wonder that some churches don't want to pay. If I was on a = church committee and I had to deal with some of the attitudes to that I've seen = with some church organists, they'd be lucky if they had a job, let alone = benefits! Monty Bennett Friendship Baptist Church Charlotte, NC  
(back) Subject: Re: Transnational organists From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 02 Aug 2004 18:02:53 -0400   On 8/2/04 4:49 PM, "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> wrote:   > But don't forget that Grieg was of Scottish descent. His father, = Alexander > Grieg, was the British Consul in Bergen.   I did not know that at ALL! (Not shocked, though.) Cute! If he was a Scotsman, it's almost inevitable that he bore Viking blood/DNA from the 10th-11th centuries.   Did he just "take a hankering" to Norse "folk" stuffs, then?--tales, = music, etc.?   Interesting!   Alan    
(back) Subject: RE: Transnational organists From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Tue, 3 Aug 2004 10:10:10 +1200   >..........Grieg was of Scottish descent. > His father, Alexander > Grieg, was the British Consul in Bergen.   You have that wrong: the surname of Grieg's father was Greig. There is no Scottish surname "Grieg and I doubt if there's an English one spelt like that either. ;-)   Ross    
(back) Subject: Practical church music From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Mon, 2 Aug 2004 18:10:24 EDT   >My beef with the schools that dont do this: they are taking all of our money and not >teaching us the basics that we need to know. Every decent = paying job on the AGO website >now has a requirement for things like STRONG = choral conducting, RSCM expertise, very >keen skills in Business Administration, = etc. Few colleges that I have seen have anything >where the Organ major is REQUIRED to take intense courses in Choral Conducting and >literature, = childrens music, handbells, a sacred music education class or two, etc. The = >schools really need to encourage their organ departments to add Sacred Music = >components, if not degree plans to offer us what we need to know.   As with most jobs, the on the job training is where one really learns things. I would tell anyone to work as an Associate in a music program or = do an Internship before stepping out on their own. This would give someone a = couple years to work in the context of an established program to learn what to = do (and even what NOT TO DO!) and not have the pressure of having to figure = it out on their own. As to handbells, children's choirs, etc., there are always workshops and seminars to attend. The AEGHR and Chorister's Guild have programs, and = most AGO chapters usually have a meeting or two during the year that deal with one = or both of those subjects. I was lucky that I worked in a church as a early =   teenager that had a very strong handbell program, so I got involved = playing bells at a young age, so I've been playing them now for 18 or 19 years. = I've been able to attend workshops with some of the major arrangers and = directors and get ideas. In regard to children's choirs, I have been fortunate to = work with some good directors, including someone who wrote a curriculum for = the Baptist School Board and for Cokesbury, and also for some people who = write for Chorister's Guild. Attending workshops and seminars is invaluable. Keep = on looking until you find someone who will work with you. Just because = someone won't help a person with RSCM doesn't mean that there aren't others who = have the same attitude. Obviously, that person is insecure with their ability = to teach the program or thinks that the person who wanted help might be a = threat. Contact RSCM directly and see if they would be having a workshop in your =   area. They have summer courses for choir members, so I'm sure that they = would have some kind of resource for directors. Don't be discouraged...keep on =   pursuing your goal. Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: RE: Transnational organists From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Tue, 3 Aug 2004 10:18:08 +1200     >I did not know that at ALL! (Not shocked, though.) Cute! If he was a Scotsman, it's almost inevitable that he bore Viking blood/DNA from the 10th-11th centuries.   Oh come on! :-)   Why would Grieg have Viking blood? The Vikings tended to be tallish, blond and with blue eyes. Pictish and Celtic Scots were generally shorter, with dark eyes and dark hair.   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: Transnational organists From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 02 Aug 2004 18:16:40 -0400   On 8/2/04 5:34 PM, "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:   > I wonder if Jarle has heard the organ at Trondheim Cathedral. It is = reputed to > be a very fine instrument.   He's only 14, for Pete's sake. But, yes. He's played BOTH the organs at Trondheim.   Alan (delighted with the kid!)