PipeChat Digest #4667 - Tuesday, August 3, 2004
 
RE: Good Pentecost music for church organist audition
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
RE: Anglican Chant
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
RE: Anglican Chant
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Playing with violin
  by "Jon Humbert" <jhumbert@ptd.net>
Re: AGO and preaching to the choir
  by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
AGO hit between eyes?
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: church music degrees
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: church music degrees
  by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: Playing with violin
  by "Nicholas Good" <nickgood@ix.netcom.com>
Re: Organists Declining and the School Programs...Starting a movement?
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: Playing with violin
  by "Alvin Wen" <wen@rochester.rr.com>
Re: Playing with violin
  by "rgunther@cantv.net" <rgunther@cantv.net>
Re: AGO and preaching to the choir
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: church music degrees
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: church music degrees
  by "Sand Lawn" <glawn@jam.rr.com>
Re: church music degrees
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com>
Re: Transnational organists
  by "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: church music degrees
  by "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net>
Re: Anglican Chant
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
Draw Us In The Spirit's Tether
  by "Raymond H. Clark" <quilisma@cox.net>
 

(back) Subject: RE: Good Pentecost music for church organist audition From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Tue, 03 Aug 2004 13:58:05 -0500   Do Lutherans not like Durufle? If I'm not mistaken, the hymn is in their hymnal (I keep mine safely downstairs under lock and key).     Glenda Sutton   gksjd85@direcway.com        
(back) Subject: RE: Anglican Chant From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Tue, 03 Aug 2004 13:58:05 -0500   Bud, your pointing brings back many happy memories.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     --- "Raymond H. Clark" <quilisma@cox.net> wrote: > > > 1. They cameth upon the keys > and did try to | maketh . good | sound, || > but | nothing | issued | forth from them. || > > 2. Then finding an handle, (pause) > they did move it | upwards . and | downwards: || > the hissing as like a hundred serpents (pause) > and the air sweeter than camel's breath, (pause) > they | brought forth | joyful | tunes. ||          
(back) Subject: RE: Anglican Chant From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Tue, 03 Aug 2004 14:20:24 -0500   Anglican chant is like riding a bicycle - you learn by doing it over and over again.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Playing with violin From: "Jon Humbert" <jhumbert@ptd.net> Date: Tue, 3 Aug 2004 15:38:40 -0300   Hi folks,   Just a few questions. I'd like to do a Beethoven violin sonata (on the organ, of course) with my sister-in-law for a prelude at church in the next couple of weeks. My question is this: what stops generally sound best with a violin and more specifically, what would sound good to substitute for the piano on a violin sonata.   This leads me to another question. My wife and I are planning on doing a Christmas concert at our church this December. At this point, we are planning on organ (me), piano (my wife), organ and piano, organ duet (we'll see), organ and violin (again, my wife) and hopefully get a handbell choir in (we have no such thing at our church). Most of the music I got (for the organ and violin) was written for organ and flute (including Charles Callahan's "A Christmas Prelude for Flute and Organ"). Does anyone have any experience with this--will violin take the flute's place successfully? Has anyone ever heard of any music for handbells AND organ (just curious)? If anyone has any suggestions for any of the above combinations (or solos), let me know. This is a HUGE opportunity for me--at our church, the organ is the thing that accompanies hymns and plays to support the talking after the service (otherwise known as the postlude). For people to actually have to listen to the organ as a solo (and otherwise) instrument might be earth-shaking for some. Thus far, I have several Dale Wood, Gordon Young pieces, a book by Emma Lou Diemer (!), a Triptych by Franklin Ashdown, a nice book by Douglas E. Wagner, several books by Diane Bish, the Oxford Book of Christmas Organ Music, etc. I'm working on the Pastorale from Guilmant's First Sonata. I've got practicing to do, but just wondered if anyone had any other brilliant ideas. Thanks so much.   Regards, Jonathan Humbert Organist, Word of Life Chapel Bainbridge, PA jhumbert@ptd.net   --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.732 / Virus Database: 486 - Release Date: 7/29/2004    
(back) Subject: Re: AGO and preaching to the choir From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Tue, 3 Aug 2004 14:37:31 -0600   Hi, Bud:   * * *   > At St. Matthew's, I was told that I would be fired IMMEDIATELY > if I involved the Guild in mediation or conflict resolution.   .. . . and isn't being fired immediately a conflict that, maybe, should be negotiated or mediated? <grins> I think it has more to do with the clergy being "in charge" of their staff, . . .or something like that.   F. Richard Burt     ..      
(back) Subject: AGO hit between eyes? From: "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Tue, 3 Aug 2004 15:06:53 -0500   Okay, is SOMEONE going to enlighten as to what "hit the AGO between the eyes" two days ago?   Dennis Steckley   "Don't cry because it's over. Smile because it happened."--Dr. Seuss        
(back) Subject: Re: church music degrees From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Tue, 3 Aug 2004 16:07:54 EDT   Shirley wrote: >Except for one in the real world. I've seen too many Westminster = *Master's level* >grads come out of that school - with a church music major - clueless on what >church music is all about. Recital work, yes. But for what worship is = all about - >namely supporting and gently leading the assembly in THEIR song - many = of the >Westminster grads I've seen fail miserably. There's too much attention drawn to >self and not enough to God. Recital work requires the attention focused = on self; >church music directs the attention AWAY from self, and not enough = college- >trained musicians can make that distinction. How true this is. I know of one area pastor who has made it clear that = he would never hire a WCC graduate because (as he puts it) the "attitude = that they are taught." I know some Westminster Choir College grads who do = wonderful jobs and their hearts are for ministry, but I know others who they are = there because it is a job and church is the only place they can play the organ. = That kind of self-centered "star" attitude often causes a rift in the = ministry of a church and is the reason that pastors and musicians often are at = each other's throats. All too often I hear fellow organists talking about how = they are going to do this or that or the other because they want to accomplish =   such and such. I always ask, "but how does it benefit ministry of the congregation and how does it keep in fitting with the pastor's goals?" = You should see the looks I get. The pastor and musicians have to work together as a = team. The musicians are as much of a minister as the ordained clergy are. We = may be part time and may not have all the benefts, but our musical ministry = sets the mood for worship and our music generally has a bigger impact on a service. If the two sides are at odds, the whole service can suffer. = Shirley has hit the nail on the head when she said that not enough college trained musicians can make the distinction between focusing on self or focusing = on God. There is a great book written by Rory Noland entitled, "The Heart of the = Artist" that deals with this very subject. It's hard to put self aside when we = get accolades for a postlude or when the choir has done a great job on an anthem, however, we have to realize that we are just vessels, and we are = there to serve God. The bottom line is that it's easy to fall into the trap of = being a "star" or a "diva", but we just have to keep our priorities straight. I know this sounds like a sermons, so I'll step out of the pulpit = now..... Monty Bennett Friendship Baptist Church Charlotte, NC  
(back) Subject: Re: church music degrees From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Tue, 3 Aug 2004 15:30:43 -0600   Hello, Monty; et al:   > . . . but I know others who they are there because it is a job > and church is the only place they can play the organ.   I have been involved in the "inner circle" and kept out of the "inner circle" of those who run, control, direct, lead the congregation in worship, and believe I have experienced most of the pro and con of the "staff" situations. The daily tone of almost all of the good ones are set by the attitudes of the pastor, priest, or rabbi. This person is ideally God's "under-shepherd" of the flock (the congregation). Also, the daily tone of almost all of the bad ones are set by the attitudes of the pastor, priest, or rabbi.   While there can be self-centeredness in the minds and hearts of the supporting personalities on the church staff, a kindly pastor can usually lead that person back into line with the goals and learning objectives of the worship experiences much easier than by whipping the errant personality back into line.   At this level of leadership, what often gets lost is the fact that God is the leader of the staff, and He regards the hearts of each member equally. Woe to the pastor who dictates his own will over the people rather than leading the staff to reflect what God is doing in the midst of the local congregation.   To whom much is given, much is expected in return. So, if we regard our gifts to play, sing, and lead the music in our churches, let's be sure we are giving them what God puts in our hearts, cooperatively, with gratitude and thanksgiving.   F. Richard Burt Staff Organ Tuner/Keeper First Baptist Church Garland, Texas     ..      
(back) Subject: Re: Playing with violin From: "Nicholas Good" <nickgood@ix.netcom.com> Date: Tue, 3 Aug 2004 15:33:39 -0500   If you have a piano at church, why not use that for the Beethoven sonata. Even if is a fairly humble spinet, it will probably be much more suitable than the organ would be for this literature.   If you want to do organ and violin, maybe start with the Handel or = Corelli sonatas, which can sound very nice the flute stops of the organ. Or look at some of the 19 th century repretoire such as Rheinberger that was specifically for these kinds of combo's.   Or do your own arrangement. Last year for Christmas eve I used the Guillmant 'Offertoire sur deux Noels', arranging many of the treble solo parts for flute and violin. It was a very pleasing part of the prelude music.   But in any case, I would really try to avoid Beethoven on the organ --- it loses too much of its character when transferred.   Nicholas Good, CAGO Lowman UMC Topeka, KS     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Jon Humbert" <jhumbert@ptd.net> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, August 03, 2004 1:38 PM Subject: Playing with violin     > Hi folks, > > Just a few questions. I'd like to do a Beethoven violin sonata > (on the organ, of course) with my sister-in-law for a prelude at church > in the next couple of weeks. My question is this: what stops generally > sound best with a violin and more specifically, what would sound good to > substitute for the piano on a violin sonata. > > This leads me to another question. My wife and I are planning > on doing a Christmas concert at our church this December. At this > point, we are planning on organ (me), piano (my wife), organ and piano, > organ duet (we'll see), organ and violin (again, my wife) and hopefully > get a handbell choir in (we have no such thing at our church). Most of > the music I got (for the organ and violin) was written for organ and > flute (including Charles Callahan's "A Christmas Prelude for Flute and > Organ"). Does anyone have any experience with this--will violin take > the flute's place successfully? Has anyone ever heard of any music for > handbells AND organ (just curious)? If anyone has any suggestions for > any of the above combinations (or solos), let me know. This is a HUGE > opportunity for me--at our church, the organ is the thing that > accompanies hymns and plays to support the talking after the service > (otherwise known as the postlude). For people to actually have to > listen to the organ as a solo (and otherwise) instrument might be > earth-shaking for some. Thus far, I have several Dale Wood, Gordon > Young pieces, a book by Emma Lou Diemer (!), a Triptych by Franklin > Ashdown, a nice book by Douglas E. Wagner, several books by Diane Bish, > the Oxford Book of Christmas Organ Music, etc. I'm working on the > Pastorale from Guilmant's First Sonata. I've got practicing to do, but > just wondered if anyone had any other brilliant ideas. Thanks so much. > > Regards, > Jonathan Humbert > Organist, Word of Life Chapel > Bainbridge, PA > jhumbert@ptd.net > > --- > Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. > Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). > Version: 6.0.732 / Virus Database: 486 - Release Date: 7/29/2004 > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Organists Declining and the School Programs...Starting a movement? From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Tue, 3 Aug 2004 16:48:27 EDT   >>On second thought-perhaps an independent group-upset pipechatters-can start >>to author letters to the heads of all major denominations stating their =   >>concerns about unfair employment practices.-because the AGO obviously = will not do it. >Gregory, >Are you a member of the Guild? Are you a member of any other = professional >musical organizations (such as ACDA, AGEHR, etc.)? >I'm just curious since the Guild has been hit between the eyes with a pretty >solid blow in the past couple of days. > >Yours, > >Darryl by the Sea     I'm confused here...what unfair employment practices are we talking = about? I've never been employed by a church that was unfair. I wouldn't even consider talking to a church that was unfair in it's employment = practices. Maybe I live and work in a dreamworld or something. I've never worked for a church that didn't have benefits or take out = taxes. Honestly, (and I'll probably get flamed for saying this) I think part of = the reason that some people have problems negotiating is the way that the = barrel on into an interview and demand things. There's a way to work out = benefits and have them throwing extras at you and there's a way to have the = checkbook so locked up that it looks like you work at Ft. Knox. It comes down to people skills...and THAT is what needs to be taught in college. People = do not want to be railroaded into anything. However, they can be convinced into =   thinking that something was their idea, and when that is the case, you = can work it to your advantage. If you come across as whiny and complaining...God = help you, because you're not going to get an ounce of support from anyone. I think writing to denominational heads is going to get people laughed = right out of any kind of legitimacy. Most denominations have some sort of = board for worship or liturgy, etc. That is how something should be addressed. = The AGO also has a Denominational Relations Task Force that works with denomination's seminaries. Why don't people address concerns to the = members of the task force. The AGO is here for it's membership. Many denominations = have musical organizations for it's members. Those groups can help. The = United Methodists have The Fellowship of United Methodists in Music Arts and = Worship (or something like that), there is the Presbyterian Assoc. of Musicians, the Anglican Assoc. of Musicians, etc. Those groups are supposed to be for fellowship, support and learning of their members, but since they are "in = house" organizations, I would think that they have a direct link to the = denomination or denominational leaders that could help address the concerns that local musicians have. I was on a panel discussion about clergy/musician relationships at a large = conference a couple years ago. The underlying thing on both sides was = that both clergy and musicians both wanted better communication. What made it =   difficult, according to the ministers, is that the musicians always came = in with a chip on their shoulders and would never listen. If we all would sit = around a campfire and sing a chorus of "Kum Ba Yah" first, we might all be = mellow enough to talk intelligently and maturely without always having to be on = the winning side. We both have to learn to negotiate. I'm sure my opinions are not going to be well thought of, but in 23 years = of working in church--both full and part time--I've never encountered = anything that was gravely unfair. I had to remind one church that they promised me = a raise after 6 months--and sure enough it came through with back pay when = they thought I would leave. That whole thing ended up just being a miscommunication with the treasurer, but the pastor got scared. It worked = to my advantage, however. LOL Anyway, work through proper channels, the denomination's music committees, = the AGO Denominational Task Force, and in local churches learn to have the = proper attitude. It makes a HUGE difference in how we are are respected = and what kind of treatment we get from the church board and clergy. Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Re: Playing with violin From: "Alvin Wen" <wen@rochester.rr.com> Date: Tue, 03 Aug 2004 16:48:30 -0400   At 02:38 PM 8/3/2004, you wrote: >Most of >the music I got (for the organ and violin) was written for organ and >flute (including Charles Callahan's "A Christmas Prelude for Flute and >Organ"). Does anyone have any experience with this--will violin take >the flute's place successfully?   In general, a violin is an excellent substitute for a flute. The reverse does not hold, however.   -Alvin      
(back) Subject: Re: Playing with violin From: "rgunther@cantv.net" <rgunther@cantv.net> Date: Tue, 3 Aug 2004 16:57:11 -0400   Two short answers regarding this:   1) what stops generally sound best with a violin and more specifically, what would sound good to substitute for the piano on a violin sonata.   Stopped 8' (Bourdon) and Rohrflute 4 works best. Any stop or stop combination that doesn't overpower the violin is good, but have care with the registration when big chords or arpeggios come into play.   2) will violin take the flute's place successfully?   On baroque organ works yes. Romantics and moderns depends on.   Cheers Andres First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet, and the cat got something to wonder about.          
(back) Subject: Re: AGO and preaching to the choir From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Tue, 3 Aug 2004 17:02:09 EDT   In a message dated 8/3/2004 2:14:35 PM Eastern Standard Time, quilisma@cox.net writes:   > Methodist ministers > don't seem to like their musicians much these days. >   too busy going to happy clappy guitar music to save the denomination.....   dale in florida  
(back) Subject: Re: church music degrees From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 03 Aug 2004 17:10:55 -0400   On 8/3/04 4:07 PM, "RMB10@aol.com" <RMB10@aol.com> wrote:   > I know this sounds like a sermon, so I'll step out of the pulpit now....= ..   Monty:   I feel like such an outsider on this. Professionally, I was a pastor (now long retired). I have done some (modest, but reasonably adequate) church music work, both as organist and (more often) as choirmaster. I'm Lutheran= , but there's nothing more God-blessed about Lutherans than anybody else. I've served on "organist selection" committees in parishes with pretty hair= y standards. Four such organist-applicants (at different times), of whom onl= y one was a Lutheran. But we picked some really FINE ones! No regrets (on our part) on any of them. Two went on to nationally known benches; one lef= t the field; the most recent is still with us. (And he's WELL paid, with ful= l medical and pension benefits for himself and family of six.)   In short, I say, Demand the absolute best, very carefully examined. Like calling a pastor (well, darn near!). And compensate him or her monuMENTall= y to be what you expect her or him to be for you. (I suspect that=B9s at least part of how YOU got YOUR job!) And we are a congregation of fewer than 150= , of VERY ordinary economic profile.   Perhaps most strangely, I do not think that that is an unusual attitude or practice in Lutheranism.   Alan  
(back) Subject: Re: church music degrees From: "Sand Lawn" <glawn@jam.rr.com> Date: Tue, 3 Aug 2004 16:19:46 -0500     Let's make sure we're all speaking of the same school. There are two Westminster's..... one the Choir College at Princeton, NJ and the other is = a Presbyterian College in western PA. Shelley attends the one in Pennsylvania.   Sand   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, August 03, 2004 11:14 AM Subject: Re: church music degrees     > Except for one in the real world. I've seen too many Westminster *Master's level* > grads come out of that school - with a church music major - clueless on what > church music is all about.    
(back) Subject: Re: church music degrees From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> Date: Wed, 04 Aug 2004 05:44:04 +0800   Could not copy the message to the digest, there was no plain text part
(back) Subject: Re: Transnational organists From: "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 04 Aug 2004 00:24:11 +0200     > So the concept of baroque-isation is probably not > quite so terrible as it may appear on paper, and my > guess is that they cleaned up the Mixtures and took > out the tierces etc. This was a common mistake, as the > model for ALL baroque organs was taken as that of > Schnitger, at the expense of everything else. I expect > that, in the example at Trondheim, there is an attempt > to create a type of Jakobikirche sound as at > Hamburg....the most likely place Norwegians might > travel to visit a baroque organ.   The Nidaros organ is some of a special case. When installed in 1930, it occupied most of the north trancept, where the Wagner organ is today. Many people (mostly architects and other non-musical personalities) were not happy with this solution, and after WW2 most of the organ was moved to the nave. The organ originally had two Swell divisions, but when the organ was moved, the larger of them was used to build a new chancel organ (except for the French reeds, which were moved to the SOLO, to replace the original Tubas!). The remaining Swell division only has weak German reeds, so the organist frequently finds use for the Solo/Swell coupler (!).   To put it out clearly; when the organ was new, the Solo division had this disposition: Diapason Stentor 8' Geigenprincipal 8' Gross Mixtur 4' 5 fach Tuba 16' Tuba 8' Tuba 4' Trompette orchestrale 8'   But after the rebuilding: Weitprincipal 8' Oktave 4' Grossmixtur 4' 5 fag Trompet 16' Trompette harm. 8' Cornopean 8' Clarin 4'   The organ used to have THREE 8' Principals on the Great, but now only one is left. Several other foundation stops were also removed, making the upperwork almost unbearable in its loudness.   Lots of foundation were removed from the Pedal division; Subbordun 32' Principalbass 16' No.1 Kontrabass 16' Harmonicabass 16' Salicional 16'   The only division left unchanged is the Fernwerk. Hans Steinmeyer spoke of this as "probably the most comprehensive organ-rebuilding ever performed in Europe". Still, it (the rebuild) isn't listed in Steinmeyer's opus list.   (Most of this information is based on my own experience with this organ, and an article written by Kyrre Svarva and Bj=F8rn K=E5re Moe, and = mirrored at Hector Olivera's site: http://www.hectorolivera.com/Z-Nidaros.htm)     > At least, by starting with a Steinmeyer, there is a > good chance that the end result was more than > satisfactory.......I have heard the word "fantastic" > used to describe the big organ at Trondheim.   It's usually said that you can still hear some of the former glory and magnificence of this great organ, but that the rebuild destroyed most of its balance. Having only a very limited experience with it myself, I must say that seems like a very appropriate description.   > It seems a shame that such a famous instrument is in > need of so much work.   It really is! A total restoration is said to cost 25 million kroner, 3.5 million USD. If only somebody won the lottery and gave the money to the cause...   - Jarle (really tired now! need sleep...)  
(back) Subject: Re: church music degrees From: "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net> Date: Tue, 03 Aug 2004 18:34:18 -0400   Excellent, Shelley. I'm glad to hear this about Westminster, New = Wilmington. And you have your priorities in the right place.   --Shirley   On 3 Aug 2004 at 12:21, Shelley Culver expounded:   > Well, I think I will be different, mainly because I'm not a > Westminster Choir College student. I go to Westminster College in New > Wilmington, PA. We're one of the only Presbyterian schools to offer a > Sacred Music degree. I enjoy recital work and playing repertoire, but > I'm doing the Sacred Music degree to, as you said, support and lead > the assembly in their song.      
(back) Subject: Re: Anglican Chant From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Tue, 03 Aug 2004 19:20:55 -0500   James M. Dahlgren wrote, in part:   >I disagree that one can learn Anglican Chant =93in a >really short amount of time.=94 > One cannot take a group which has no familiarity with chant, whether or not Anglican Chant, and teach them Anglican Chant in a short amount of time. However, if one has a group which has familiarity with Chant, whether Anglican, plainsong, or some other form, and if the group has a consistent grasp of the principles used in pointing, then, IMO, Anglican Chant is among the easiest for English speakers to learn.   I would add, though, as with many other things, where the key to success depends upon the quality of the tools and materials used, and the skill of the craftsman, so with chant, the key to success in chanting lies in the person doing the pointing having a thorough of the rules of English grammar and syntax for the period in which the text originated, a sound understanding of the text, and the context, that is, what the text is intended to declaim or proclaim in the situation at hand, and of the abilities of the singers singing it.   And there needs to be consistency in the pointing used. I submit that most problems come about from mixed, and inconsistent pointing systems. Pick one system, and stick to it, whether it be Stainer, Bairstow, New St. Paul's., or the Anglican Chant Psalter. When one tries to use pointing from mixed systems, the problems multiply exponentially, IMO.   ns  
(back) Subject: Draw Us In The Spirit's Tether From: "Raymond H. Clark" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Tue, 03 Aug 2004 17:41:23 -0700   Can someone please scan or fax me either the accompaniment out of Worship II or Worship III, or the first verse of the anthem? I promise I own Worship II and the octavo, but I can't find either.   THANKS!   Bud