PipeChat Digest #4671 - Wednesday, August 4, 2004
 
RE: My little pipe organ
  by "Mark & Cinda Towne" <mstowne@concentric.net>
RE: Real versus Digital!
  by "Mattcinnj" <mattcinnj@yahoo.com>
Re: My little pipe organ
  by <Tspiggle@aol.com>
RE: premise for discussion
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Real versus Digital!
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com>
Re: My little pipe organ
  by <Joshwwhite@aol.com>
Re: Qualified ELCA Organists
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
Re: Qualified ELCA Organists
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com>
Informal survey - most difficult Bach
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: My little pipe organ
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Informal survey - most difficult Bach
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: My little pipe organ
  by <Joshwwhite@aol.com>
Re: Qualified ELCA Organists
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: Informal survey - most difficult Bach
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Informal survey - most difficult Bach
  by <PMMGBOB@aol.com>
Dale Wood favorite
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Dale Wood favorite
  by <Rachmaninoff45@aol.com>
RE: Real versus Digital!
  by "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@earthlink.net>
RE: Real versus Digital!
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Dale Wood favorite
  by "Berdie Bowlsby" <fasttoccata@sbcglobal.net>
Re: Dale Wood favorite
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Re: Dale Wood favorite
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Re: premise for discussion
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: My little pipe organ
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Informal survey - most difficult Bach
  by "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com>
Re: Dale Wood favorite
  by "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com>
Re: My little pipe organ
  by <OMusic@aol.com>
Re: Informal survey - most difficult Bach
  by <OMusic@aol.com>
Re: Dale Wood favorite
  by "DVR" <DVRmusician@webtv.net>
 

(back) Subject: RE: My little pipe organ From: "Mark & Cinda Towne" <mstowne@concentric.net> Date: Wed, 4 Aug 2004 15:08:59 -0700   Hi Josh,   Best wishes to you and opus 551. I have opus 655 (1941) currently in storage and awaiting installation. When I was at the AGO convention, I visited the Reuter booth and let them know that one of thier "children" = was doing well and just sleeping for the time being. I know that they were quite pleased to know the status of one of thier instruments that was not = in it's original location.   Regards,   Mark S. Towne Sub Dean, Southern Nevada Chapter, AGO & Conclave Coordinator, Region IX 2006 Mid-Winter Conclave   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of Joshwwhite@aol.com Sent: Wednesday, August 04, 2004 9:07 AM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: My little pipe organ       Hi guys, I just bought a little pipe organ, Rueter opus 551, installed = in Texas Women's University in 1938. I just finished putting the case together, and I am about to put in = pipes. There is a total of 3 ranks, unified like crazy. The voicing is very nice with bright, clear sound. electropneumatic action, with mechanical switching.       Here is the stoplist:   Pedal:   16' Bourdon   8' Bass Flute   4' Choralbass       Swell:   16' Bourdon   8' Stopped Flute   8' Quinte Flute (Derived)   8' Quintadena   4' Octave   4' Flute D'Amore   2' Octave   2 2/3 Nazard   8' Oboe (Derived)       Great:   16' Bourdon   8' Principal   8' Stopped Flute   4' Octave   4' Stopped Ped Flute   4' Quint Flute   2' Principal   2' Pedal Flute       Anyway, its a great little organ, however it needs a little nicking (all the nicks have been filled). But other than that, a wonderful practice organ!   Thanks,   Josh White  
(back) Subject: RE: Real versus Digital! From: "Mattcinnj" <mattcinnj@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 4 Aug 2004 15:10:08 -0700 (PDT)   Ross, I KNOW the Trinity Church acoustic .... probably better than anyone on = this list. For about 4 years in the early '70's .... just as the Skinner = organ was going in ... and after, I assisted Larry King and various = organists ... along with the curator of the Organ. Often in the dead of = the night ,,,, often for many long hours. When I heard the recording, I heard that acoustic I know so well .... so = much so I was overwhelmed with the memories of "that place". What you are hearing is Trinity Church. !!! (Minus the subway) Matt   TheShieling <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> wrote:   >I received the CD this morning, and can only say that it is the nearest = to a pipe organ that I have ever heard. So much so, that I am planning a trip =   to New York City in the Fall to hear it for real.   You have not heard the instrument at all, but merely a recording of it. = That cannot even begin to match an instrument in a building with that. = Recording engineers, and your own stereo set's interpretation of them, can do all kinds of things in recording sounds. On this List, we've heard statements about how E.Power Biggs's recording engineers greatly modified the sound = of the organs he was recording. If that was possible 40+ years ago, it's even more possible now.   Too, electronic instruments suffer less in recording than (pipe) organs = do, as electronic sounds come from loudspeakers anyway. By merely recording pipes you ermove a great deal of the quality of tone experienced in the building, be it good tone or bad.   Sorry to be so definite, but I've learned over many years never to trust recordings, but merely to accept that they may give a vague approximation. =     Ross     ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: List-Digest: List-Unsubscribe:     --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? New and Improved Yahoo! Mail - Send 10MB messages!
(back) Subject: Re: My little pipe organ From: <Tspiggle@aol.com> Date: Wed, 4 Aug 2004 18:26:20 EDT   Josh, congratulations. I've had a little Moller for about 29 yrs.   You say your organ is 3 ranks. In looking at the specs, the first rank is obviously diapason and the second is stopped flute, but what is the 3rd?   Tom  
(back) Subject: RE: premise for discussion From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 5 Aug 2004 10:36:50 +1200     >A Swell organ with an 8' Open Diapason and chorus reeds at 16-8-4 is required to play the Anglican service.   That's going too far. There are many places where this is not possible and yet the services are played beautifully and in keeping.   Ross      
(back) Subject: Re: Real versus Digital! From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com> Date: Wed, 04 Aug 2004 18:37:21 -0400   At 05:26 PM 2004-08-04 -0400, you wrote: >Not wanting to start the eternal argument, - may I simply suggest that = any >one who has doubts about the merits of a digital organ might do worse = that >listen to the Epiphany Opus One organ that is now installed in Trinity >Church, New York City. > >I received the CD this morning, and can only say that it is the nearest = to >a pipe organ that I have ever heard. So much so, that I am planning a >trip to New York City in the Fall to hear it for real. > >Marshall and Ogletree have done a fine job with their Epiphany Opus One = organ. > >Bob Conway   Bob,   As one who has seen this instrument, heard it and played it, I must say that if there is a digital instrument worthy of a pilgrimage it is this one. I believe it has advanced the art of electronic organ building. It is interesting when you play it, it responds like an electro-pneumatic organ, rather than a typical electronic organ. It also has an incredible buildup in the ensemble, which is quite different again from your run of the mill digital.   The recording should just whet your appetite for hearing it.   Arie V.   P.S. Notice I didn't compare it to the real thing, the sound that is.      
(back) Subject: Re: My little pipe organ From: <Joshwwhite@aol.com> Date: Wed, 4 Aug 2004 18:39:38 EDT   The 3rd rank is the Quintadena, playable at 8' & 4'. Thanks, Josh White  
(back) Subject: Re: Qualified ELCA Organists From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Wed, 04 Aug 2004 17:40:09 -0500   Swedish5702@aol.com wrote:   > * Being a traveling FM radio executive I try and make it to a service > every Sunday. One thing I have noticed in a great many Lutheran > churches is the lack of top notch players. > > ...<snip>... > > The priority seems to be to have an assistant pastor first and > whatever monies remain go for the organist/choir director. > *   To understand the reasons for this, one has to consider the greater history of Lutherans in North America. There were Lutherans in North America from early on, and by all accounts, the earliest Lutherans were a pretty "high-church" bunch. The first Lutheran ordination (in the 1600s) included Latin hymns and ordinary, if I remember correctly. However, most Lutherans who came to North America after about 1812 or so (just a convenient date to use, no particular significance to it) were, to the contrary a rather pietistic bunch. Part of the reason that they emigrated in the first place was a dissatisfaction with the Liturgical practices in the parishes in their respective countries of origin. For the most part, choirs, and choral settings of the communion service, were disfavored, on the one hand, and not practical on the other, as many Lutherans tended to be from, and drawn to rural areas, forming a large number of small, economically weak congregations. Of necessity, due to the lack of a choir, the congregation assumed the role, in line with Luther's Vernacular settings. Certainly, larger congregations in urban areas (like Chicago, and Minneapolis / St. Paul) had strong music programs, and developed good choirs, but even there, congregational participation was the norm, if not the rule.   Furthermore, based upon my personal observations, Lutherans tended to be the Liturgical churches in working class, lower middle, and middle class neighborhoods. These were not (for the most part) the folks going downtown on Tuesday night to the Symphony, or the Opera. If they were involved with music, it was on a participatory basis, playing in the company or community band, or singing in the company or community chorus (and it should be noted that for every communtiy band and chorus around today, a century ago, there were probably at least ten times as many as there are today). A congregation could meet its needs for music with largely homegrown talent, and most did so.   In my opinion, most Lutheran churches these days still want "good music", but they are not necessarily so concerned with "great music". I notice, for example, from time to time that non-Anglican Choirs travel to England to sing services in some of the Great Cathedrals; I've seen listings of Methodist, Presbyterian, and Baptist choirs singing services and Evensong, for example. I have not yet seen (which I do not mean to be interpreted as it not having happened) a Lutheran choir (except for College choirs on European tours) going to England to sing in a Cathedral setting.   Some of this is also influenced by choices Lutherans (as a whole) made after WW II, when they decided (based upon the fact that most existing Lutheran Churches were small) to establish many small congregations, instead of a fewer number of larger ones. This was not helpful to Lutheran church music, because since the level of music appreciation in Lutheran parishes was relatively high, the money was not there to fund the desires. This pushed many of these parishes into electronics, and since economics have generally not improved significantly, that is where many of those parishes still are.   Finally, many parishes have a "good enough" mentality, like much of the rest of society does these days. The music is good enough that it doesn't need attention, until time comes to find a new musician, or a new instrument. And when that time comes, very often the congregation, being often populated by baby-boomers with baby-boomer tastes, act accordingly, and try to get what seems to be as much as they can for as little as possible, too often (at least in my opinion) failing to remember the adage about getting what one pays for.   ns  
(back) Subject: Re: Qualified ELCA Organists From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com> Date: Wed, 04 Aug 2004 18:46:28 -0400   At 03:42 PM 2004-08-04 -0500, you wrote: >Craig, > >Not to start the "Fake vs.. Real" p*****g contest again, I have to say >that reality is there are some very fine state of the art digital >instruments now available in the market place. These instruments are = much >more affordable than a "real" organ, and have a sound quality that is >realistic to the point of being virtually indistinguishable from >pipes. Musicom real time synthesis technology comes to mind. Listen to >and play a Copeman Hart, Saville, Veritas, or Cantor and you'll be >amazed. I have a II/27 Cantor at home and prefer it's sound and >playability over the II/31 "real organ" at church. > >Cheers, > >Tim > >Craig wrote "IF IT DOESN'T HAVE PIPES, IT ISN'T AN ORGAN!"     Tim,   Is Cantor still in business? Their web-site went down several months ago, =   and can't find them anywhere on the web except for some dealers.   Arie V.  
(back) Subject: Informal survey - most difficult Bach From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Wed, 04 Aug 2004 17:42:43 -0500   I would like to hear opinions on the most difficult (no more than 4, please) Bach organ selection(s) to play.   I do not know the answer to this question, obviously. However, my guesses based on my amateur experience would be (and not necessarily in order of difficulty):   1 - Toccata in F 2 - Dorian Toccata and Fugue 3 - Passacaglia and Fugue 4 - Wedge Prelude and Fugue (there was one other than this one when I thought up this question, but for the life of me I can't remember it now)   I know there are objective and subjective factors to consider - feel free to explain your answer. Thanks for your participation.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Re: My little pipe organ From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Wed, 04 Aug 2004 15:59:25 -0700   Josh, I wonder if you could fit a little reed into those holes?   Bud   Joshwwhite@aol.com wrote:   > The 3rd rank is the Quintadena, playable at 8' & 4'. > Thanks, > Josh White      
(back) Subject: Re: Informal survey - most difficult Bach From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Wed, 04 Aug 2004 16:02:59 -0700   Toccata in F is by far the easiest of the four listed; I'd say the most difficult Bach organ piece is NOT a prelude and fugue, but the large setting of Vater unser in Clavieruebung III.   Bud   Glenda wrote:   > I would like to hear opinions on the most difficult (no more than 4, > please) Bach organ selection(s) to play. > > I do not know the answer to this question, obviously. However, my > guesses based on my amateur experience would be (and not necessarily in > order of difficulty): > > 1 - Toccata in F > 2 - Dorian Toccata and Fugue > 3 - Passacaglia and Fugue > 4 - Wedge Prelude and Fugue (there was one other than this one when I > thought up this question, but for the life of me I can't remember it > now) > > I know there are objective and subjective factors to consider - feel > free to explain your answer. Thanks for your participation. > > Glenda Sutton > gksjd85@direcway.com > > > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: Re: My little pipe organ From: <Joshwwhite@aol.com> Date: Wed, 4 Aug 2004 19:04:03 EDT   Bud, thats a good suggestion, I have thought about that....Could drill out = the rackboard if anything. However, there is no room in my house, let = alone the organ case to even THINK of adding anything to the organ....unless it = was a small spanish Dulzian, mounted to the front of the case, hehe.... Josh  
(back) Subject: Re: Qualified ELCA Organists From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Wed, 4 Aug 2004 19:09:47 EDT   In a message dated 8/4/2004 4:38:53 PM Eastern Standard Time, acfreed0904@earthlink.net writes:   > Not ENOUGH, of course. Let me guess at under 100 nationwide; and a = second > tier of another 200   i would love to be there......any of the 200 and not the 75$ a week i = make now.....but that is an old story. dale in florida  
(back) Subject: Re: Informal survey - most difficult Bach From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Wed, 4 Aug 2004 19:10:38 EDT   In a message dated 8/4/2004 5:57:18 PM Central Daylight Time, gksjd85@direcway.com writes:   1 - Toccata in F 2 - Dorian Toccata and Fugue 3 - Passacaglia and Fugue 4 - Wedge Prelude and Fugue (there was one other than this one when I thought up this question, but for the life of me I can't remember it now)       They're all tough! LOL Here are four that came to mind: Trio Sonatas Wedge P and F Fantasia +Fugue in g Toccata, Adagio and Fugue ___________________________________________________________________________= ___ _________ _______________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ _______________________________ ________________ Gregory Francis Ceurvorst 1921 Sherman Avenue # GS Evanston, IL 60201 847.332.2788 home/fax 708.243.2549 mobile _Home Email: gfc234@aol.com_ (mailto:gfc234@aol.com) _Mobile Email: gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net_ (mailto:gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net)    
(back) Subject: Re: Informal survey - most difficult Bach From: <PMMGBOB@aol.com> Date: Wed, 4 Aug 2004 19:34:34 EDT   buy the Angela Hewitt transcription of the passacaglia and fugue on her "Bach arrangements" CD. She does it in 11 minutes.......brilliantly. ELucas  
(back) Subject: Dale Wood favorite From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Wed, 04 Aug 2004 18:33:49 -0500   Another question: What is your favorite Dale Wood piece?   I don't know them all, but so far my favorites are the Pisgah piece mentioned last week and "My Shepherd Will Supply My Need" (tune Resignation).   This question functions as a recommendation to me of what other Dale Wood would be excellent for either service or recital.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Re: Dale Wood favorite From: <Rachmaninoff45@aol.com> Date: Wed, 4 Aug 2004 19:51:16 EDT   My favorite is Come, O Thou Traveler Unknown. I played it for my grandfathers funeral. I also like Amazing Grace and I Need thee Every = Hour.   Best Regards, Gregory Hinson    
(back) Subject: RE: Real versus Digital! From: "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 4 Aug 2004 18:59:28 -0500   I heard it in the flesh (mine, anyway) last month and the sounds were impressive down to the rattle of the pedal reed. The overall effect, = though was of a recording played through a very expensive sound system. Very impressive but an imitation is an imitation.       -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of Bob Conway Sent: Wednesday, August 04, 2004 4:27 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Real versus Digital!     Not wanting to start the eternal argument, - may I simply suggest that any one who has doubts about the merits of a digital organ might do worse that listen to the Epiphany Opus One organ that is now installed in Trinity Church, New York City.   I received the CD this morning, and can only say that it is the nearest to a pipe organ that I have ever heard. So much so, that I am planning a = trip to New York City in the Fall to hear it for real.   Marshall and Ogletree have done a fine job with their Epiphany Opus One organ.        
(back) Subject: RE: Real versus Digital! From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 5 Aug 2004 12:12:13 +1200   >Not wanting to start the eternal argument, - may I simply suggest that = any one who has doubts about the merits of a digital organ might do worse that listen to the Epiphany Opus One organ that is now installed in Trinity Church, New York City.   What was the cost? $10,000? $100,000? $1,000,000? $10,000,000?   I'm also curious to know what numbers that lot have at services.   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: Dale Wood favorite From: "Berdie Bowlsby" <fasttoccata@sbcglobal.net> Date: Wed, 4 Aug 2004 17:22:21 -0700 (PDT)   What book of Dale Wood's is the Pisgah piece in? Berdie   Glenda <gksjd85@direcway.com> wrote: Another question: What is your favorite Dale Wood piece?   I don't know them all, but so far my favorites are the Pisgah piece mentioned last week and "My Shepherd Will Supply My Need" (tune Resignation).   This question functions as a recommendation to me of what other Dale Wood would be excellent for either service or recital.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com           ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: List-Digest: List-Unsubscribe:    
(back) Subject: Re: Dale Wood favorite From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Wed, 4 Aug 2004 19:26:19 -0500   Pisgah may be my favorite Dale Wood organ work (I probably own but 1/3 of his output, so my knowledge of his work is limited). A recent one of his that I like is Intrada Festiva (from Exaltation--Festive Processionals for Organ, =A9 1998, Sacred Music Press 70/1175S). His Brother James' Air from 1986 is quite nice and could serve as an alternate to Searle Wright's setting.   Robert Lind   ----- Original Message ----- From: Glenda Sutton <gksjd85@direcway.com>   > Another question: What is your favorite Dale Wood piece? > > I don't know them all, but so far my favorites are the Pisgah piece > mentioned last week and "My Shepherd Will Supply My Need" (tune > Resignation). > > This question functions as a recommendation to me of what other Dale > Wood would be excellent for either service or recital.    
(back) Subject: Re: Dale Wood favorite From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Wed, 4 Aug 2004 19:31:41 -0500   Organ Book of American Folk Tunes (Sacred Music Press, =A9 1970). The = earliest collection of his in my possession is Seven Folk Tune Sketches, = H.W. Gray =A9 1966. Does anything precede that?   Robert Lind ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Berdie Bowlsby=20 To: PipeChat=20 Sent: Wednesday, August 04, 2004 7:22 PM Subject: Re: Dale Wood favorite     What book of Dale Wood's is the Pisgah piece in?  
(back) Subject: Re: premise for discussion From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Wed, 4 Aug 2004 20:37:00 EDT   Listers: Haskell re-entrant tubes have come back into vogue because they work, = and they work well. A mitered pipe takes up three times the floor space as a Haskelled pipe if it has a 180-degree mitre. An open pipe cannot be mitred = just anywhere; special attention must be paid to the mitre's proximity to the acoustical node. Fractional-length resonators for normally full-length reeds are at = best a compromise. For Clarinets and Basset Horns, which are normally = half-length, making them quarter-length is also a mistake. "Grooved" or borrowed basses, or stopped basses on open ranks, are usually a failure. Changing pipe forms is usually ill-advised, and taking = the bass of an Open Diapason from a wooden stopped flute will never, ever give a satisfactory result. Yes, you'll get a pitched drone, but it will not fool = anybody. Some 19th century French builders made OPEN wood basses for their = metal 8' Flutes Traversieres, and placed those basses outside of the Recit = expression box. Think about this: is the organ too big for the room? If you can't fit = it in, might there be a reason? Is that reason an over-zealous organist who demands more organ than required, or is the organ's designer and architect = not thinking creatively? If it's that tightly packed, how will it be tuned = and maintained?   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City Installing a Haskelled 16' Contra Bass this month http://www.glucknewyork.com/ ..  
(back) Subject: Re: My little pipe organ From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Wed, 4 Aug 2004 20:39:24 EDT   Congratulations, and best wishes on a mature, thoughtful, and sound = decision all around. Please go out of your way to make as many people aware of the instrument as possible.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City http://www.glucknewyork.com/   ..  
(back) Subject: Re: Informal survey - most difficult Bach From: "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com> Date: Wed, 04 Aug 2004 17:41:34 -0700     ----- Original Message -----=20 From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org>   > I would like to hear opinions on the most difficult (no more than 4, > please) Bach organ selection(s) to play. > > I do not know the answer to this question, obviously. However, my > guesses based on my amateur experience would be (and not necessarily in > order of difficulty): > > 1 - Toccata in F > 2 - Dorian Toccata and Fugue > 3 - Passacaglia and Fugue > 4 - Wedge Prelude and Fugue (there was one other than this one when I > thought up this question, but for the life of me I can't remember it > now)   Well, I don't (because I can't) play any of the four, but I suspect that I would find some movements of the Trio Sonatas even more difficult, and two of the chorale trios (Allein Gott in der H=F6h and Jesus Christ, unser Heiland) from the Clavier=FCbung one additional notch higher on the terror alert scale.   MAF   of  
(back) Subject: Re: Dale Wood favorite From: "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com> Date: Wed, 04 Aug 2004 17:47:23 -0700     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org>   > Another question: What is your favorite Dale Wood piece? > > I don't know them all, but so far my favorites are the Pisgah piece > mentioned last week and "My Shepherd Will Supply My Need" (tune > Resignation).   Ditto on Pisgah. My other favorites are Simple Gifts (in WoodWorks Book 3) and In the Garden (Softly and Tenderly Volume 3.   MAF    
(back) Subject: Re: My little pipe organ From: <OMusic@aol.com> Date: Wed, 4 Aug 2004 20:55:39 EDT   Josh, do you live in Denton? I understand they have a Holtkamp (Martini) = and a Roy Redman tracker and a 4 manual Roy Redman 87 rank organ, as well as = the Reuter. We live just a few miles from TWU. Lee  
(back) Subject: Re: Informal survey - most difficult Bach From: <OMusic@aol.com> Date: Wed, 4 Aug 2004 21:11:23 EDT   Trio Sonatas Schubler Chorales The three Concerti (Keith's answers) Lee  
(back) Subject: Re: Dale Wood favorite From: "DVR" <DVRmusician@webtv.net> Date: Wed, 4 Aug 2004 20:14:46 -0500   "In This Moment of Remembrance"   "Keep a Song in Your Heart!". . . . .Donna