PipeChat Digest #4672 - Wednesday, August 4, 2004
 
Re: premise for discussion
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Use of a Stentorphon
  by <DionDave@aol.com>
Re: Organists Declining and the School Programs...Starting amovement?
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: Use of a Stentorphon
  by "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com>
Re: Use of a Stentorphon
  by <OrganMD@aol.com>
MY APOLOGIES! Re: Organists Declining and the School Programs...Startinga
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: Informal survey - most difficult Bach
  by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: My little pipe organ
  by <Joshwwhite@aol.com>
Re: Dale Wood favorite
  by "Sand Lawn" <glawn@jam.rr.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: premise for discussion From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Wed, 4 Aug 2004 20:18:15 -0500   One of the great Swells of all times is generally considered to be the = Henry Willis I Swell at St. Paul's Cathedral, London. The stoplist of this is relatively small for such a large instrument and has always been:   16' Contra Gamba 8' Open Diapason 8' Lieblich Gedact 8' Salicional 8' Vox Angelica 4' Principal 2' Fifteenth III Rks. Cornet (17-19-22) 16' Contra Posaune 8' Cornopean 8' Hautboy 4' Clatrion   As with many Willis organs the impact is mainly due to the reeds, but careful observation suggests that the 16' and 4' reeds don't actually contribute a lot to the total effect, and that the main element is an ENORMOUS Cornopean. It is therefore interesting that in his small organs = -- for example the 8 stop Nave Organ of 1881 at St. Paul's -- Willis often included a three-stop Swell organ, comprising:   8' Open Diapason (really, a Geigen Principal) 4' Gemshorn 8' Cornopean   Those, actually, are the stops that you really need to do the job. Personally I like the odd string or two on the Swell as well, though = Willis preferred to put these on the Choir, and often didn't have any on the = Swell, even on quite large instruments. Take for example, St. Bee's Priory, his last great instrument, where the Swell was:   8' Open Diapason 4' Gemshorn 2' Flageolet III Rks. Mixture (12-19-22) 16' Contra Posaune 8' Cornopean 8' Oboe 8' Vox Humana 4' Clarion   Wot? No 8' Gedeckt? No strings (except, of course, for the 16') ? All this runs counter to a lot of what people think, but it seems to work very nicely.   John Speller   ----- Original Message ----- From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, August 04, 2004 5:36 PM Subject: RE: premise for discussion     > > >A Swell organ with an 8' Open Diapason and chorus reeds at 16-8-4 is > required to play the Anglican service. > > That's going too far. There are many places where this is not possible = and > yet the services are played beautifully and in keeping.      
(back) Subject: Use of a Stentorphon From: <DionDave@aol.com> Date: Wed, 4 Aug 2004 21:30:33 EDT   The beautifully done OHS Buffalo Handbook arrived in Monday's mail (kudos = to Mssrs Ambrosino, Schnurr, Levasseur, et. al. for their hard work on such a =   magnificent publication). I noticed that the Solo Division of the St. = Joseph Cathedral organ contains a Stentorphon which, as I found out, can be = roughly described as a loud diapason. I'd like to know (1) is there any = literature that calls for it; (2) how would it be used in a service or concert and (3) = does any CD feature one so I could hear an example?   Other questions that come to mind are: - did Ken Cowan use it in his OHS recital. If so, how? - how would you use one if your instrument had one?   To elaborate on the last question, I'd ask list members to speak about the =   possible uses of a Stentorphon in denominational settings (realizing of = course that such a stop has no use in small worship spaces). Perhaps some list members may want to add their thoughts (Bud on Anglo-Catholic, Glenda on = Episcopal, Charlie & others on Lutheran, Scott and Stephen on R.C., Monty on Baptist, =   Sebastian on Jewish, etc.)   Thanks in advance for replies. Dave Dion  
(back) Subject: Re: Organists Declining and the School Programs...Starting amovement? From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Wed, 04 Aug 2004 21:52:43 -0400   Darryl, Hello. I am in Portland Maine performing on the Kotzschmar organ. = (Yeah- I have to LEAVE TOWN to play a good organ. What's wrong with this = picture???)   Anyway, what's the "rather serious blow" the AGO has been hit with in the = past few weeks? Did I miss something?   -Scott  
(back) Subject: Re: Use of a Stentorphon From: "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com> Date: Wed, 04 Aug 2004 18:54:36 -0700     ----- Original Message ----- From: DionDave@aol.com Other questions that come to mind are: - did Ken Cowan use it in his OHS recital. If so, how? - how would you use one if your instrument had one?   >To elaborate on the last question, I'd ask list members to speak about = the possible uses of a Stentorphon in denominational >settings (realizing = of course that such a stop has no use in small worship spaces). Perhaps = some list members may want to >add their thoughts (Bud on Anglo-Catholic, = Glenda on Episcopal, Charlie & others on Lutheran, Scott and Stephen on = R.C., >Monty on Baptist, Sebastian on Jewish, etc.)   >Thanks in advance for replies. Dave Dion   How it would be used would depend more on its sound than its name. There = are not too many pieces in the literature that call for that kind of big = unison Diapason (and it's probably best to think of it as an English Open = Diapason No. 1 of the Edwardian era which happens to play from the Solo = rather than the Great). But assuming it's a nice sound (and there are = Stentorphones that sing), it would be useful for the tenor solo lines in = works like the Walford Davies Solemn Melody or Thalben-Ball Elegy, or for = the trios of Pomp and Circumstance Marches or the John Ireland Epic March. = It may or may not combine well enough with the Tuba to give some extra = weight if that's required. Hard to think in principle of how it would be = useful in Bach or any French music that I can think of, though everything = really depends on How It Sounds In the Room.   MAF  
(back) Subject: Re: Use of a Stentorphon From: <OrganMD@aol.com> Date: Wed, 4 Aug 2004 21:59:40 EDT   A well done Stentorphone can be a glorious solo voice. A stop does not = have to be called for in Bach or the French music to have a use. This for = sure is a stop of romantic origins and should be seen in that light. Rocky Mountain Organ Co., Inc. William S (Bill) Hesterman, President   Representing Austin Organs, Inc.    
(back) Subject: MY APOLOGIES! Re: Organists Declining and the School Programs...Startingamovement? From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Wed, 04 Aug 2004 22:02:52 -0400   My apologies to thelist. I am once again traveling and on an unfamiliar = computer (in its workings that is).   -Scott  
(back) Subject: Re: Informal survey - most difficult Bach From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Wed, 4 Aug 2004 22:04:01 -0600   Hello, Glenda, et al: You wrote: > I would like to hear opinions on the most difficult > (no more than 4, please) Bach organ selection(s) to play. > * * * > 1 - Toccata in F > 2 - Dorian Toccata and Fugue Hooray. I like this one very much. <grins>   > 3 - Passacaglia and Fugue > 4 - Wedge Prelude and Fugue. . . F. Richard Burt Dorian Organs ..    
(back) Subject: Re: My little pipe organ From: <Joshwwhite@aol.com> Date: Wed, 4 Aug 2004 23:24:38 EDT   I live in Boyd, which is about 15 minutes North of Fort Worth. I work = for Roy and that is how I got involved with the little Rueter. I've been sick today and I've been itching to get the pipes in place, but = I guess that will have to wait till the weekend. When we removed the = organ, not one pipe was missing, let alone damaged. Just an update... Josh  
(back) Subject: Re: Dale Wood favorite From: "Sand Lawn" <glawn@jam.rr.com> Date: Wed, 4 Aug 2004 23:17:25 -0500   I like to use WoodWorks Vol. 3. I have used them all as one big = Prelude.... (my church likes a 15 minute Prelude time.) One member always reminds me = if I have not played "Brother James" lately. I have started calling her on Saturday to remind her to be early for the preludes.   Sand   >