PipeChat Digest #4690 - Tuesday, August 10, 2004
 
Re: PipeChat Digest #4688 - 08/09/04
  by "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr>
off days
  by "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com>
Re: Good days and bad days
  by "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net>
Re: Hammond in Sao Paulo
  by "rgunther@cantv.net" <rgunther@cantv.net>
Re: Baldwin D912 Digital Organs (opinions please!)
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com>
Music and the plastic arts
  by "Paul Kealy" <imkealy@yahoo.com>
Re: Music and the plastic arts
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
The Cruel Toppling of Pedestals (VERY SERIOUS)(x-post)
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: The Cruel Toppling of Pedestals (VERY SERIOUS)(x-post)
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Re: The Cruel Toppling of Pedestals (VERY SERIOUS)(x-post)
  by "rgunther@cantv.net" <rgunther@cantv.net>
Re: Hammond in Sao Paulo
  by "Domitila Ballesteros" <dballesteros@uol.com.br>
Hell review
  by "OUSCDB" <ouscdb@earthlink.net>
Re: Hell review
  by "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org>
Hammond in Brasil
  by "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #4688 - 08/09/04 From: "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr> Date: Tue, 10 Aug 2004 14:34:19 +0300   Hans-Friedrich Hell" <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de> wrote "Guessing and assuming simply does not help."   The problem with information obtained from the media, and this list is a form of this genre, is that it is often incomplete. If there is a story behind the scenes, we are not necessarily aware of this. Actually, I think my post helped clarify the issue, not least by prompting Mr Hell to reply. = I still can't see how Douglas Campbell was criticised, and he has as yet = given no explanation of his post. It did not seem to reflect what appeared in print. There used to be a regular feature on the Royal Festival Hall's monthly calendar of forthcoming events called "point and counterpoint". It = featured reviews in the British Press of concerts and recitals, with reviewers frequently taking a totally conflicting view of the same concert. I = maintain what I said, that if you appear or write in a public or limited private forum then your performance and opinions are there to be discussed. A = review is one person's opinion of a specific occasion. It may represent the consensus on the issue or it may take an entirely different point of view. You can agree or disagree with it, and I appreciate that it is hard not to take criticism personally. There is some truth in the Hollywood adage that to be successful in show business you need "talent, looks and the hide of = a rhinoceros." Soprano Dame Kiri Te Kanawa used to say "I always know when I have given a good performance because none of the other students will talk to me!" I think if Malcolm Weschler's review had been treated for what it was, a review, then no one would have thought any more about it. John Foss      
(back) Subject: off days From: "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Tue, 10 Aug 2004 07:54:17 -0500   HI, I don't give my opinions on topics such as this very often but I do = have a comment on this. I agree with Colin, we are all human and thus do human things. If I were Felix Hell and heard some of the insipid comments from time to time about him and others, I wouldn't want to be here either. We need to get over ourselves sometimes and leave this young man alone. He isn't God, just an extremely talented young man who has a busy schedule = and does what he can do and does it well. So he is off of this list. So what? It's none of our business why. I sometimes wonder if the backbiting that = we hear here on occasion, isn't because of how well the person(s) plays or = not, but because of our own jealousies and insecurities as the console. = Thanks, Gary    
(back) Subject: Re: Good days and bad days From: "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net> Date: Tue, 10 Aug 2004 09:27:37 -0400   Dear Colin, Maybe, just maybe Felix was pushed just a bit too hard despite his abilities where, at his age, it is difficult to achieve balance or know = when it is time to take a break. I sadly remember my own nephew whose father = and coaches believed that he would win the swimming gold in the 1984 Olympics and it all ended in a pretty sad existence. God forbid. I am not wishing that for Felix or anyone else but sometimes we adults need to back off and allow our kids to just grow like the mighty oak with a warm sun and gentle watering. Paul   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, August 10, 2004 12:16 AM Subject: Good days and bad days     > Hello, > > I'm not going to get embroiled in the Felix Hell "off > day" performance; if indeed that was the case. > > I would however, make an observation. > > I have heard some of the finest performers in the > world play brilliantly, and I've heard them make > mistakes or play quite badly. I've also played badly > myself from time to time. > > We are all human, subject to tiredness, moods, apathy, > nerves and those days when we just "aren't in the > right frame of mind" for any number of reasons. > > Dr Francis Jackson; a performer I admired more than > most, was quite capable of "off days." There was a > famous recital, which went so badly, that the BBC held > him back to re-record it for radio.......yet he was > one of the most brilliant and most musical performers > in the world. > > Obviously, people are disappointed when something like > this happens, and so too is the performer. > > So "IF" Felix had a bad hair day, allow him the > privilege of being human. Taking the wider view, I > guess from what I have read about him, he thrills and > delights 99% of the time. > > His fellow countrman Michael Schumacher, is a legend > in his own time, but he does sometimes get it wrong! > > Unlike almost all other art, a musician is as good as > his last performance once the critics have had their > say! > > I'm sure that a quick canter around Bavaria will do > more for Felix than anything else. Getting away and > doing something different is the best tonic of all! > > Regards, > > Colin Mitchell UK > > > > > __________________________________________________ > Do You Yahoo!? > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around > http://mail.yahoo.com > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >     --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.721 / Virus Database: 477 - Release Date: 7/16/2004    
(back) Subject: Re: Hammond in Sao Paulo From: "rgunther@cantv.net" <rgunther@cantv.net> Date: Tue, 10 Aug 2004 09:46:38 -0400   These Hammond oldies are in fact indestructible! How many of them were exported to South America is difficult to account. What's more: They still are restorable if the pests didn't get in too far. Electric Power failures didn't bother them, and I still remember the chaacteristic coconut smell they emanated (later I knew it comes from the wheel lubricant). In Caracas there lives a man who is a real wizard on vintage Hammonds and gets original spare parts from Colombia (!). I learned to play organ on a B-3, on which my father played for many years ("El Redentor" Presbyterian Church, Caracas). The last notice I had was that the organ still exists, but the church switched over to Praise Band, so the organ isn't used too much...   Reminiscences from the Past :) Andres   First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet, and the cat got something to wonder about. ----------- Mensaje Original -------------- De: nycchelsea@yahoo.com [nycchelsea@yahoo.com] Para: PipeChat [pipechat@pipechat.org] Cc: Asunto: Hammond in Sao Paulo Fecha: 09/08/2004 22:01:47 Mensaje:   I was in Sao Paulo Brasil last week and happened on a Hammond (C2 I think) in a Catholic (of course) church there... at Nossa Senhora Do Brasil in the Jardin area.   photos and a sound clip/movie are at: http://www.rodgers550.com/c2.html   I lost the name of the lady organist there, if anyone happens to know that please send me a email off list?   I understand that this Hammond was installed there in 1945. There is another Hammond (again another C2 I believe) in the organ/choir loft as well, but don't know the story on it... if you are ever down that way please pay a visit on Sundays at 12:30 to visit the upstairs. She is extremely friendly, just does not speak much english and I speak even less portuguese, but was a incredible experience all the same.   John Rust http://www.reuter822.com http://www.rodgers550.com     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - 50x more storage than other providers! http://promotions.yahoo.com/new_mail   ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>        
(back) Subject: Re: Baldwin D912 Digital Organs (opinions please!) From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com> Date: Tue, 10 Aug 2004 10:00:59 -0400   At 06:49 PM 2004-08-09 -0400, you wrote: >Hi Arie, > >I won't put my answer in all caps screaming, nor insinuate that = everything >else he says is suspect (even though Dale did that to me). > >I will say that I'll bet the Baldwin D-911 and D-912 (of the D. H. Howard =   >line of Church Organ Systems) were made by Intercontinental Electronics = in >Italy. Also made by that company was Church Organ Systems' Wurlitzer >organs and their Domus line of organ. > >Betcha, betcha... > >Paul R. Swank >No connection to a Baldwin Dealer in Baltimore > > > >At 02:52 PM 8/9/04, you wrote: >>At 12:37 PM 2004-08-09 -0400, you wrote: >>>In a message dated 8/9/2004 11:49:20 AM Eastern Standard Time, >>>ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com writes: >>> >>>>If the D-911 was not made by Viscount, then who made them? >>> >>> >>>the 911 was a general music product....when COS formed with wurlitzer >>>brand then everything became intercontinental. >>> >>>dale in Florida >> >>Dale, >> >>I shall check through my brochures tonight at home. I still think the >>D-911 is a Viscount re-badge. >> >>Arie V.   Paul and Dale,   Re the Baldwin D-911.   The brochure I found last night was of the models D-900 and D-910. These were re-badged Galanti organs from GeneralMusic with the D-900 being the Praeludium I, and the D-910 being the Praeludium II.   So I'm pretty sure that the D-911 is an Intercontinental product, being essentially the same model as the D-912, but with lighted tabs. I believe =   they are the same technology as the Wurlitzer C-250 and C-300 products.   Arie V.  
(back) Subject: Music and the plastic arts From: "Paul Kealy" <imkealy@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 10 Aug 2004 08:11:53 -0700 (PDT)     Music is a moment in time, unlike the "plastic arts=94 that are created or = captured forever.     Not enough blue in the sky? ... Keep adding hues from the palate until the = painting looks right before hanging it on the wall.     Sculpture doesn=92t look =93just right?=94 ... Keep chipping away at it = until it does before unveiling it.     Even a pipe organ builder can keep tweaking in the chambers until all the = ranks play to satisfaction, a little adjustment, adjust a collar, nick a = pipe, add some solder or beeswax before the concert.     But performance? ... Ah, there=92s the rub. It is one-on-one ... performer = to audience.     And of course, Hollywood has spoiled us all ... everything is recorded = until the tape is perfect, and only THEN is it lip-synched into a film = loop. No hiccups allowed ... the audience thrills with the glory of = victory without ever experiencing the agony of defeat.     As for me, Give me Hell ... or Mitchell ... on their worst day, knowing it = is for REAL, not a sanitized, predigested performance. Let us NOT be = afraid to push the limits of our ability or stay in the comfort zone of = the green room, fearful of "console up" if the day doesn=92t =93feel = right.=94     There is a =93can do=94 attitude that Annie Oakley sings through Ethel = Merman and others ... =93... though your favorite uncle died at dawn ... = you=92re broken hearted, but you go on ... There=92s no business like show = business ...=94 (or church ministry, pipes at the pizza parlor, whatever) = that showcases the value of the organist. It=92s LIVE, folks, not Memorex. = It is music, not plastic art.     And God help the persnickety rascals that focus on the rare =93clam=94 or = botched blurb in reviewing the performance!     Let=92s give permission for the occasional artist to stumble on our = stairway to the stars!   Paul E. Kealy   From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:   I have heard some of the finest performers in the world play brilliantly, and I've heard them make mistakes or play quite badly. I've also played badly myself from time to time.      
(back) Subject: Re: Music and the plastic arts From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 10 Aug 2004 11:45:49 -0400   On 8/10/04 11:11 AM, "Paul Kealy" <imkealy@yahoo.com> wrote:   > Music is a moment in time, unlike the "plastic arts=B2 that are created or > captured forever. >=20 Wow! Is THAT ever a post worth digesting two or three times!   Alan    
(back) Subject: The Cruel Toppling of Pedestals (VERY SERIOUS)(x-post) From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Tue, 10 Aug 2004 12:16:11 EDT   Dear List Members: The topic heading here is a bit misleading, because I don't know = whether it is a greater act of cruelty to force somebody atop a pedestal or to = kick the pedestal out from beneath them just as they have found their balance. = There are a handful of issues here, interrelated, tangential, and complex. I'll = try to keep this short (right, Seb...). With youthful talent and/or ability (two very different things) comes = the desire to "do it all"; when others become excited FOR you (parents, = teachers, a band of frothing sycophants), the encouragement is often so undiluted = that the wonder of it all takes over, and the general sense of invincibility = that comes with adolescence clouds some of one's judgment. Fortunately, in my mid-'teens, when I was serving time at The = Juilliard School, my teacher reined me in. I wanted to play the Bach Passacaglia = (and Fugue) in c. My teacher, Jon Gillock, refused to assign it. "While I am = sure that you could play every note of it, you do not have the emotional maturity to =   play it." When I protested, he asked, "Have you ever known anybody who has = died? Have you fallen in love and been rejected?" The questions kept coming. To this day, I have not learned the work, and wish I had at least learned the = notes so that today, having buried friends and relatives, lived through = September 11th, experienced the joy of being in love as well as the death of a = spouse, I could play the work passionately. Fortunately, I had no adoring public to either push me forward or subsequently turn the tables on me. Nor was = anybody investing their energy in speculating about my every move or lack thereof. The other side of the coin was explained to me by Michael Barone, who challenged me to consider the wonder of uncomplicated, untainted, unjaded, =   youthful joy, the uncontaminated newness that comes to a work when a = hopeful and exuberant teenager approaches a work without the burden of established = influence. That, too, is valid. That is what keeps us from going stale. "Das schadet dir nichts" is the battle-cry of those who lie in wait to =   watch the mighty fall. Oddly, it seems unusually common amongst those who = serve religious institutions. And within the organ "community," it goes well = beyong rolling eyes and huffing and puffing by the score-readers who come to criticize recitals rather than listen to them. If we wonder what's "killing the profession," it might be our refusal (NOT our inability) to make judgements for ourselves. "I hear he can't play his way out of a paper bag." "I hear she got fired for being drunk." "Somebody told me that he underbid on the organ, stole the church's silver, and burned the place down." "The only reason she's Choir Director is that she had sexual relations =   with every member of the vestry, the board of trustees, and the choir." "Oh, he's a total fraud. I've never heard one of his instruments, but they can't be good. Just look at him. What a bulls&*t artist." These things get repeated and transmitted by people who KNOW that they =   can't possibly be true. But it is the human condition to relish being the provider of information that is "new" and "juicy." It doesn't occur to the =   perpetrators that it can be damaging to careers, depriving people of their = livelihood. That's right. Jobs. Money. Food. Tuition. Destroyed because of vicious = rumor. Even as adults, the victims cry themselves to sleep and give up on their dreams of living a life centered on the King of Instruments. It IS true that there ARE frauds out there, with confused lives, checkerboard resumes, and deservedly poor reputations. One can lose a job = or two, but if one jumps from church to church, year after year, or has bad experience =   after bad experience, then some evaluation may be in order. If the ONLY = factor common to ALL the horror stories is the person in question, there is a = lesson to be learned. Nonetheless, many among us have had to endure years or decades of = slander and libel regarding our education, our abilities, and whether or not we = are "frauds." How many of us have been subjected to cruel comments about our = physical appearance, which turn into assumptions about our personalities, which inevitably lead to a reputation of deeply flawed character that is so = baseless as to be improbable, all because we LOOKED a certain way? If it weren't so evil, = it would be still be childish. Finally, do we REALLY expect young people to become organists when = they see and hear the attacks, colleague upon colleague? They won't become = organists if they are afraid of being victimized. Worse yet, they cringe in horror = to think that somehow, they, too, will become the attackers, become the type = of person they fear the most. None of this is helped by the culture of contempt for intellectuals = that, having taken over our nation in the past few years, has invaded the organ "community." Sorry folks, you cannot simultaneous demand and detest high standards. Maybe THAT is at the root of our professional death.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City Flying to Rome in the morning for a week http://www.glucknewyork.com/   ..  
(back) Subject: Re: The Cruel Toppling of Pedestals (VERY SERIOUS)(x-post) From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Tue, 10 Aug 2004 12:34:35 -0400   If there is ever a "Sage" in our midst, it has to be Sebastian Gluck.   Re-read his latest post on the topic of toppling pedestals, and you will see what I mean.   I have purposely not included Mr. Gluck's post, as it is too long to = quote, and I really do think that every one of us should read it again.   Thank you Seb, for a really thoughtful post.   Bob Conway    
(back) Subject: Re: The Cruel Toppling of Pedestals (VERY SERIOUS)(x-post) From: "rgunther@cantv.net" <rgunther@cantv.net> Date: Tue, 10 Aug 2004 13:33:19 -0400   Folks,   I just saved this in WORD format for future refenrence. I think we should read it over several times and go deeply into ourselves. A simple "Amen to what Sebastian said" is far too banal and superfluous here.   As for the episode with the Bach Passacglia & Fugue in c minor, the opposite happened to me. My organ instructor told me to play Messiaen's "Dieu Parmi Nous" when I was 22 and about to degree at the Music High. I told him that I didn't understand the piece at all and for that I wouldn't dare to play it in my graduation recital. Mtr. Castellanos' answer was: "just play it and follow the indications. Later on, when you understand Messiaen, you at least already know how to play the notes so you don't = lose time with basics- you can put in your understanding".   Now I understand Messiaen, but have exchanged the organ bench with the workbench. The reasons for that come very close to what Sebastian told us. Never mind, I had wonderful hours restoring and repairing organs and don't regret my decision. And certainly I will have many more.   Aa a last thought, to my experience the most acrid and mean, destructive critics and reputation murders almost always come from people who suffer some kind of frustration. This is just my experience, I repeat - not any sidekick on certain recent discussions on this Forum.   Very thoughtfully yours Andres      
(back) Subject: Re: Hammond in Sao Paulo From: "Domitila Ballesteros" <dballesteros@uol.com.br> Date: Tue, 10 Aug 2004 14:47:35 -0300   dballesteros@uol.com.br wrote:   Hello   rgunther@cantv.net wrote:   >These Hammond oldies are in fact indestructible! How many of them were >exported to South America is difficult to account. >   Yes. There are many Hammonds in Rio de Janeiro. Domitila      
(back) Subject: Hell review From: "OUSCDB" <ouscdb@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 10 Aug 2004 11:00:16 -0700   by special request - copied from piporg-l list serve -- sorry if i've = done this twice     C O P Y   Friends   In defense of Mr Weschler's review of Mr Hell's performance - completely ignoring the time issue - I feel Malcom was restrained.   I also felt the registrations were "over the top" in many places. While Malcom felt the Reger was much better than acceptable - I did not. I = don't think Mr Hell began to play with eithor security or real musicality = until he left the music and moved into the Liszt "Ad Nos".   In my opinion - admitedly not worth much - the Reger merely moved from = Forte to Fortissimo and back while searching for its home key. Lots of notes. Lots of sound. Very little music   The Franck, again in my own opinion, received at best a perfunctory = reading, certainly not the very special treat that I had been lead to believe we could expect from this "wunder-kind".   I don't feel Mr Hell relaxed into the music until he put the music away = and played the Liszt from memory. We heard singing phrases, both graduated = and sudden dynamic changes, variety of tone color and volume levels from = piano to forte, and generally were given a very musical experience.   Was I as impressed with the performance as I thought would have = justified all the hype and hupla this artist has generated in the last couple of years? NO! There is a fine musician, and remarkable technician in Mr Hell. But in general, that was not what was delivered in Buffalo. I = think I'll wait another year or 2 before my next effort to hear this young = man.   And - following the dificulties of the Reger and Liszt - informing the audience - in this case which included many knowledgable organists - = that he would move to something simple, a Bach trio sonata proved that 3 notes = at one time does not make it simple!   Someday I'd actually like Malcolm to write a review that said how he = really felt - without trying not to hurt someone else's feelings.   GN George Nelson     George Nelson   < ouscdb@earthlink.net >   internet - <http://www.geocities.com/Vienna/Opera/2397/ouscdb.html>  
(back) Subject: Re: Hell review From: "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Tue, 10 Aug 2004 13:29:31 -0500   Hi all,   These comments are on the mark....In case you missed it....Stephen = Roberts made an excellent point in his posting about the function of the organists at an OHS Convention...their purpose is to showcase and demonstrate the instrument. Felix is not the only organist in Buffalo who didn't understand this....case in point...in one program using the super-octave couplers with the mixtures did not display the better aspects of the instrument. When one accepts a playing position at an OHS Convention...attended by a great many musically educated folks, you had better realize that you are playing to a much more critical house than Aunt Minnie and her friends in Podunk, Iowa (no offense intended to the Iowans among us)   regards,   Jon C. Habermaas     At 01:00 PM 8/10/2004, OUSCDB wrote: >by special request - copied from piporg-l list serve -- sorry if i've >done this twice > > >C O P Y > >Friends > >In defense of Mr Weschler's review of Mr Hell's performance - completely >ignoring the time issue - I feel Malcom was restrained. > >I also felt the registrations were "over the top" in many places. While >Malcom felt the Reger was much better than acceptable - I did not. I = don't >think Mr Hell began to play with eithor security or real musicality until = he >left the music and moved into the Liszt "Ad Nos". > >In my opinion - admitedly not worth much - the Reger merely moved from = Forte >to Fortissimo and back while searching for its home key. Lots of notes. >Lots of sound. Very little music > >The Franck, again in my own opinion, received at best a perfunctory = reading, >certainly not the very special treat that I had been lead to believe we >could expect from this "wunder-kind". > >I don't feel Mr Hell relaxed into the music until he put the music away = and >played the Liszt from memory. We heard singing phrases, both graduated = and >sudden dynamic changes, variety of tone color and volume levels from = piano >to forte, and generally were given a very musical experience. > >Was I as impressed with the performance as I thought would have justified >all the hype and hupla this artist has generated in the last couple of >years? NO! There is a fine musician, and remarkable technician in Mr >Hell. But in general, that was not what was delivered in Buffalo. I = think >I'll wait another year or 2 before my next effort to hear this young man. > >And - following the dificulties of the Reger and Liszt - informing the >audience - in this case which included many knowledgable organists - that = he >would move to something simple, a Bach trio sonata proved that 3 notes at >one time does not make it simple! > >Someday I'd actually like Malcolm to write a review that said how he = really >felt - without trying not to hurt someone else's feelings. > >GN >George Nelson > >George Nelson > >< <mailto:ouscdb@earthlink.net>ouscdb@earthlink.net > > >internet - ><<http://www.geocities.com/Vienna/Opera/2397/ouscdb.html>http://www.geocit= ies.com/Vienna/Opera/2397/ouscdb.html>      
(back) Subject: Hammond in Brasil From: "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com> Date: Tue, 10 Aug 2004 11:32:23 -0700   I was in Sao Paulo Brasil last week and happened on a Hammond (C2 I think) in a Catholic (of course) church there... at Nossa Senhora Do Brasil in the Jardin area.   -------   Well, there's really something very sweet and special about that web page - I get the sense that you had a very spiritual experience there and it somehow still resonates within you.   One can argue until they are out of breath about the sound of a Hammond, but I have to say I found the nice lady's labors very touching. I have not heard "old school Hammond" playing like that [e.g., sans Leslie and quaint "Hammond touch"] in many, many years - since I was a little boy. Hearing it "took me back to days of yore" hearing my Mama play the crackling, booming OLD (C1) Hammond at Gwynns Island Baptist Church in Virginia.   Back in 1987 I was in Manila and visited some of the churches. Played the magnificent early 1900s organ in the Manila cathedral with an enormous En Chamade complement. Played the chirpy, quaint Bamboo Organ in Las Pi=F1as. The one organ that was double-padlocked and clearly HANDS OFF was a Hammond C3 in the Baptist Church there in Metro Manila. Ironic, eh.   Thanks again for sharing your "Brasilian" experience.   ~ C