PipeChat Digest #4696 - Sunday, August 15, 2004
 
POSTED FOR A FRIEND - redundant pipe organ available
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: wir glauben: two versions of the chorale
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
And I thought Swedes were vegetables
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Proper Organ Footwear
  by "edward a mccallum" <edmack2@juno.com>
Re: Swedes as Minorities
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: And I thought Swedes were vegetables
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Hurricane Charlie
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Looking for visible students of...
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Hurricane Charley (corrected spelling)
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
[LONG] Lawn mowers, middle age, and pilgrimages, Part 1 of 2
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Aug. 18 Recital in Brooklyn  (x posted)
  by "Kenneth Potter" <swell_shades@yahoo.com>
A Few Words about Organ Live
  by "mack02445" <mack02445@comcast.net>
RE: A Few Words about Organ Live
  by "Sam Vause" <vause@cox.net>
Re: [LONG] Lawn mowers, middle age, and pilgrimages, Part 1 of 2
  by <OMusic@aol.com>
Organs and Organists online update August 15th
  by "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr>
Re: And I thought Swedes were vegetables
  by "Harry Grove" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: POSTED FOR A FRIEND - redundant pipe organ available From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sat, 14 Aug 2004 03:17:41 -0700   Medium-sized 2 Manual and Pedal Pipe Organ Available.   The Church of the Holy Cross, Billesley, Birmingham, England has the above instrument for disposal.   The Organ is essentially "worn out" and, whilst playable, is not serviceable for serious purposes without complete restoration.   Probably built by Walter James Bird (amongst others) early in the 20th century, the instrument contains some delightful ranks of pipework, particularly the eight and four foot flutes and the four and two foot principals on the Great Organ.   The comprehensive specification (for a smallish instrument) includes full choruses to mixture on Great and Swell, a choice of eight foot reeds on the Swell, and a Pedal Organ of five stops.   With Mechanical action to the manuals and electro-pneumatic to the Pedals, the organ would make a rewarding project for restoration by an enthusiast, or professionally at a cost estimated to be in the region of ten thousand pounds Sterling, failing which it offers a range of redundant pipework which might usefully be rehomed in an existing installation.   The Organ is remarkably compact for one of such specification, some of the more obtrusive pipework having been professionally mitred at time of installation to fit beneath the roof in the West End gallery.   The instrument is offered "free to a good home" (small donation appreciated) to any Church or individual who would recondition it for continued use in Christian Worship of any tradition, or for sale for any other purpose at a modest price reflecting its condition. No guarentee of usefullness is offered; the instrument is for disposal "as seen". Buyer collects.   Expressions of interest should be communicated to Father George Hodkinson by electronic mail to george@hodkinson4crosses.freeserve.co.uk or by telephone to (UK) 0121 444 1737.      
(back) Subject: Re: wir glauben: two versions of the chorale From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Sat, 14 Aug 2004 07:00:46 -0500   There were of course two different hymns -- "Wir glauben all' an einen = Gott" and "Wir glauben all' a einen Gott, Vater", and among other things J. S. Bach wrote chorale preludes on both of them BWV 680 (and a couple others) for the first and BWV 740 for the second.   John Speller      
(back) Subject: And I thought Swedes were vegetables From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 14 Aug 2004 06:32:55 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Robert raises an interesting wider point.   I am no expert in the avante-garde or the contemporary music scene, for the simple reason that it is badly publicised or remains unplayed generally.   It isn't of course, just Swedish organ-music which has suffered.   I may be demonstrating a certain ignorance here, and I hope that others will feel free to tear me apart if my comments deserve it, but isn't a lot of so-called modern organ music simply an extension of what has gone before? The world seems to abound with mock French music, dubious chorale based compositions and toccatas which fail to thrill. The more avante-garde seem to throw ink at paper.   Are we not stuck on the perpetual carousel of revivalist Messaien/Tournemire/Durufle/Hakim etc?   At least Milhaud was brave enough to compose silence when he had nothing to say!!   Indeed, let's be utterly outrageous, by suggesting that some of the very worst contemporary organ music has come out of the USA and the UK!!!!!!!!! (That should stir things up).   Now for something different.......   There is a fine tradition in the Scandanavian countries, and also in Holland, and some good music has been written. The same is also true of the Czech Republic....especially the music of Peter Eben.   Maybe we are so stuck in the school of perpetual toccatas and latter day impressionism, we cannot see the worth in other schools of modern composition....and I am as guilty as the next.   When I go to Holland, I hear many improvisations. They are not in the French style, but in a more ordered, quasi contrapuntal style. Of course, they are not carefully crafted compositions, but a perhaps an impressionistic glimpse of the musical ether in that country. The fact that organists from other countries are also invited to improvise, makes for a fascinating couldron of international musical ideas.   In about 10 days time, I shall be once more in Holland for my "Annual Dutch dash".........the improvised pieces are a constant source of refreshing ideas, and a taste of things which do not sound like Herbert Howells singing in the bath, or Messaien improvising on a Shaker hymn tune!   Could it be, that Sweden, Holland and the Czech Republic are the ONLY countries which now really matter when it comes to dragging the organ into the 21st century?   OMG! I think I'd better duck and cover!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Robert Lind <lindr@core.com> wrote:   > If one looks for the amount of Swedish organ music > played in the USA, there > is no doubt that it qualifies as minority > literature. To help change that > just a tiny bit, I'm playing an all-Scandinavian > organ recital at North Park > Covenant Church, Chicago, on October 17.       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Take Yahoo! Mail with you! Get it on your mobile phone. http://mobile.yahoo.com/maildemo  
(back) Subject: Re: Proper Organ Footwear From: "edward a mccallum" <edmack2@juno.com> Date: Sat, 14 Aug 2004 12:13:01 -0400   my favorite was mildred alexander-p--!! ALSO WITH GREAT PEDAL work-----!     ed mc callum-melbourne- florida-   b-3,concorde,t-311,t-500,yamaha digital grand----storm missed me  
(back) Subject: Re: Swedes as Minorities From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 14 Aug 2004 12:53:30 -0400   On 8/13/04 6:59 PM, "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> wrote:   > I'm playing an all-Scandinavian organ recital at North Park > Covenant Church, Chicago, on October 17.   Wonderful! Wish I could be there. And the organ is. . . .?   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: And I thought Swedes were vegetables From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 14 Aug 2004 13:01:52 -0400   On 8/14/04 9:32 AM, "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:   > Could it be, that Sweden, Holland and the Czech Republic are the ONLY > countries which now really matter when it comes to dragging the organ = into the > 21st century?   And Estonia?   Alan    
(back) Subject: Hurricane Charlie From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sat, 14 Aug 2004 10:08:07 -0700   My sister and her family are OK ... they were a bit north of the path (between Mulberry and Lakeland) ... but the next towns over (Lake Wales to the east and Arcadia to the south) sustained heavy damage.   There are reports of sixty people dead in a trailer park between Bartow and Lake Wales, but they can't get in yet to search. My sister said the news photos looked like the trailers exploded.   She said they have power, but nobody east of Lakeland does.   Anna Maria Island and the Church of the Annunciation were spared; the hurricane was supposed to cross directly over the island and into Tampa Bay, but evidently it came ashore south of that, looped up into the center of the state, missed Bartow and Lakeland, and hit Lake Wales and Arcadia.   Lake Wales is the home of the Bok Singing Tower Carillon and Gardens ... no word yet as to whether that was damaged or not.   Please pray for the victims and their families.       Bud      
(back) Subject: Looking for visible students of... From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 14 Aug 2004 11:40:42 -0700 (PDT)   Hello list. Im looking for a bit of information, that some of the New Yorkers may be = able to assist in. Im looking for visible students of Stephen Hamilton, either out of = CUNY-Hunter or Copeland. Comments on them would be helpful as well. If any = of you know of curent Choral Conducting students out of Mannes with Mark = Shapiro (I think?) that would be helpful as well. I do ask that you RSVP in private, as not to clutter the list, because = this is a personal matter of investigation for my own purposes. Blessings.     From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com
(back) Subject: Hurricane Charley (corrected spelling) From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Sat, 14 Aug 2004 14:04:31 -0500   Bud Clark wrote: -------Original Message------- > My sister and her family are OK ... they were a bit north of the path (between Mulberry and Lakeland) ... but the next towns over (Lake Wales to the east and Arcadia to the south) sustained heavy damage. Glad to read this. I wanted offer only one minor correction: the Hurricane's name is Charley! > There are reports of sixty people dead in a trailer park between Bartow and Lake Wales, but they can't get in yet to search. My sister said the news photos looked like the trailers exploded. My brother made mention of that situation also. He said that they simply didn't leave! > Please pray for the victims and their families. AMEN! Prayers offered! Faithfully, Richard Schneider  
(back) Subject: [LONG] Lawn mowers, middle age, and pilgrimages, Part 1 of 2 From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sat, 14 Aug 2004 15:54:22 -0500   Lawn mowers, middle age, and pilgrimages, Part 1 of 2   I am suffering a severe case of middle-aged angst. It is true - everything is out of kilter, and no remedy seems to work. In the meantime I am plagued with chronic isolationism, unparalleled horniness, surges of anger, severe melancholia, bouts of profanity, fits of arthritis, and mad cravings. I zip through my work, then stare at the computer screen and try to think of someone to vex. I can make a rottweiler cringe. I'm reading 'War and Peace' online when bored, and anticipating the war scenes.   Thankfully, events have intervened to try to steer me back toward the organ and my love for it. So in the past weeks I have made pilgrimages to local organs with friends from the list and not, to introduce them to what the Panhandle has to offer.   It started one day at Barnes & Noble. I was in the music section looking, or not looking, and suddenly I came face to face with a CD of Bach played by Helmut Walcha. I thought, 'I should own this,' and now I do. Listening to it, I suddenly had an overwhelming desire to play the BWV 552. So I started practicing it, both on organ and piano.   The next thing I knew Keith Zimmerman and his family came to Destin for vacation. We made arrangements to meet at the church of his choice for Sunday service. It turned out to be a PCA in Niceville, and the service carried me back to my childhood in the Southern Baptist church, with 40-minute long sermons, and communion with grape juice in tiny individual-serving cups. The church had an Allen which we agreed seemed well-matched to the building, and the organist, albeit very accomplished, played everything from the same book by someone called DeCou. All in all, it was pleasant. The minister looked like he could not be over 19, and the people were very friendly.   From there I took them to Giusepppi's, the local dead fish eatery not known to tourists, nestled not far from the mouth of Rocky Bayou on Choctawhatchee Bay. This is where I take my favorite expert witness clinical psychologist to argue him into testifying the way I want (it seldom works) and to make sure his little folder on me is complimentary (which means I don't get to drink and have to behave somewhat). I of late dread these sessions, because although he is a great old friend and has already seen me at my worst, I feel I must rehearse being sane and normal before the meetings, just in case.   Anyway, within sight of the gulls and ducks and sail- and motorboats we had a pleasant repast. His children were beyond reproach, the best behaved young people I had seen in years (even surpassing my godchildren, who are of course perfect). He was interested in a road trip to see an organ in Crestview and one in DeFuniak, so off we went, his wife in the car with me.   It's about a 20-minute trip from Niceville to Crestview to see the Kenneth Jones tracker at First Methodist Church (http://www.pensacola-ago.org/organs/fumcrest.html). Judging from his expression, Keith enjoyed the instrument. He plays well, and while his wife and children quietly roamed the sanctuary or read, he played to his heart's content.   From there it was a 30-minute drive to the town that time forgot, for him to see St. A's little organ (http://www.pensacola-ago.org/organs/stagadfs.html). I thought he would be interested in both because although they are both small, they represent vast differences, from tracker to electropneumatic, from totally independent ranks to unison ranks, from large limited acoustic to tiny live acoustic. Dr. Keith had expressed his interest to the list in building or installing his own home instrument. The family was suitably impressed with the round lake in the middle of town with the antebellum homes surrounding it, and the quaint little church. I thoroughly enjoyed spending the day with them.   I settled down to a week of court and depositions, somewhere in there turning another year older - that fueled the fires of discontent. I was so bad that the opposition wanted to schedule regular meetings with me so I could warn them before kicking the crap out of them in court (where in the law does it say I have to do that?). The road to hell is paved with good intentions, but it was hard to go to the church and practice my St. Anne, my Mendelssohn No. 3, and my Franck E major when I was sopping wet from getting caught in thunderstorms all week (the construction crew destroyed the courthouse parking lot, making us park a block away and walk, and then let the former parking lot site turn into a mudhole).   That weekend I burned up my push lawnmower and had an argument with Rick about whose duty it was to check the oil in the blasted thing. Then we had to make a pilgrimage of a different sort to buy me a new one, a new-fangled Husqvarna with Honda engine that is too heavy to push, and I cannot control the self-propelled control thingee. I pulled my neck out of joint from fighting with it for 40 minutes, then gave up and took a hydrocodone because of the intense pain and lack of a personal masseur. Meanwhile Rick was sharing in my angst because the sheriff's primary race is only weeks away, and we're wondering whether he will be able to hang on to his job the one more year necessary to retire with full benefits.   Part 2 of 2 coming to an e-mail box near you.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Aug. 18 Recital in Brooklyn (x posted) From: "Kenneth Potter" <swell_shades@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 14 Aug 2004 14:16:04 -0700 (PDT)   Dear List,   For the three Sundays, I am serving as vacation substitute organist at St. Ann's and The Holy Trinity at the corner of Clinton and Montague Streets in Brooklyn Heights. In case you don't know the organ there is one of the very finest E. M. Skinner organs. It was built in 1925 and contains 84 ranks of pipes. Back in the sixties someone had the idea to add 45 stops to the original specification and replaced the four manual Skinner console with a five manual. Fortunately, lack of funds prevented the stop additions, but the console was put in (with the usual sad array of drawknobs with blue dots). The swell reeds were revoiced so they are hugely loud, and the tuba mirabilis was removed from the solo enclosure and placed en-chamade. Lack of proper support caused the pipes to sag and come apart and it became unusable.   John Randolph has been slowly doing a wonderful restoration of this landmark instrument. The solo division which hadn't worked in years has been completely restored, and the tuba rebuilt and returned to it's original enclosed position as E. M. intended. To celebrate the restoration of the Solo division, Thomas Murray recently gave a gala recital there.   Every Wednesday at 1:10 p.m. there are lunchtime recitals there, most often played by their very talented titular, Gregory Eaton. If you haven't heard him, you should make it a point to, and bring a check for the organ fund. They are currently fundraising for restoration of the console which should happen soon.   The church is a masterpiece by Minard Lefever, and its interior puts most Manhattan churches to shame. The glass by Bolton is the earliest collection of figural stained glass in America. One window in on permanent loan to the Metropolitan Museum where it is displayed.   Next Wednesday's recital features the second string - me. It has been a joy to practice on this fine instrument and prepare a recital for it. My program is as follows:   Chaconne in d minor Francois Couperin Andante Cantabile and Finale from "Symphony IV" by Charles-Marie Widor Stele Pour Un Enfant Defunt from "Triptique" by Louis Vierne Festal Flourish by Gordon Jacob (to show off that tuba!) Priere a Notre Dame from "Suite Gothique" by Leon Boellmann (strings to die for) Grand Choeur in Bb Major by Theodore Dubois (bring airport hearing protection)   I'd love to see you there.   Ken Potter   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D Kenneth Potter, Substitute Organist 845/358-2528 <swell_shades@yahoo.com>, 845/480-1416 cell =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D  
(back) Subject: A Few Words about Organ Live From: "mack02445" <mack02445@comcast.net> Date: Sat, 14 Aug 2004 18:16:44 -0400   Fellow List Members,   I am sure by now most of you are aware of the Internet Station/Channel OrganLive.com. A service provided by Brent Johnson of organ music broadcast 24/7 in excellent stereo sound. Having had a modest role in assisting Brent to get his project off the ground I have been able to learn more of what is involved in keeping this excellent service running. There are several sponsors already and Live 365 does kick back some portions of membership monies from preferred members.   I am writing to notify all that enjoy this service as much as I do that it is in danger of being shut down, due to lack of sponsorship. I know its tough with so many worthy causes out there requesting financial help from you and me. I feel strongly about this enough to write this letter asking those who value a service that provides 100% organ music available 24 hours a day to consider keeping it on the air. I have donated recordings and money, when I can afford it, being unemployed has many drawbacks but I felt it necessary to put my money where my mouth is and have. Now I am sure many of you listen to this great service at times or continuously as I do and have not helped support it. I urge you to consider sending a donation, or if able to, become a sponsor. Information on how to do this is posted on the OrganLive.com web site.   As I have stated, I have no interest in this service other than I am a Preferred Member of Live365 and contribute when I can as I enjoy being able to listen to fine quality organ music day or night. I have only the highest praise for Brent and those who helped him get OrganLive off the ground and improved to the quality it is today. If you haven't listened to this station try it and decide for yourself if you feel as I do about supporting this service.   Cheers, Mack    
(back) Subject: RE: A Few Words about Organ Live From: "Sam Vause" <vause@cox.net> Date: Sat, 14 Aug 2004 16:38:11 -0700   Mack, Very Well said! I enjoy this station (both at home and work) so much that one or two dollars a day is reasonable for me. You may find another amount (more, or less) reasonable for you, but I suspect any amount will be appreciated by Brent.   You may contribute, as I just did, by visiting OrganLive.Com and following down through several nearly hidden links, or visit http://www.organlive.com/contribute.htm. PayPal is a wonderfully easy way to whole-heartedly support this online privelege! --sam Sam Vause (Chandler, AZ)   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of mack02445 Sent: Saturday, August 14, 2004 3:17 PM To: Piporg-L; PipeChat Subject: A Few Words about Organ Live   Fellow List Members,   I am sure by now most of you are aware of the Internet Station/Channel OrganLive.com. A service provided by Brent Johnson of organ music broadcast 24/7 in excellent stereo sound. Having had a modest role in assisting Brent to get his project off the ground I have been able to learn more of what is involved in keeping this excellent service running. There are several sponsors already and Live 365 does kick back some portions of membership monies from preferred members.   I am writing to notify all that enjoy this service as much as I do that it is in danger of being shut down, due to lack of sponsorship. I know its tough with so many worthy causes out there requesting financial help from you and me. I feel strongly about this enough to write this letter asking those who value a service that provides 100% organ music available 24 hours a day to consider keeping it on the air. I have donated recordings and money, when I can afford it, being unemployed has many drawbacks but I felt it necessary to put my money where my mouth is and have. Now I am sure many of you listen to this great service at times or continuously as I do and have not helped support it. I urge you to consider sending a donation, or if able to, become a sponsor. Information on how to do this is posted on the OrganLive.com web site.   As I have stated, I have no interest in this service other than I am a Preferred Member of Live365 and contribute when I can as I enjoy being able to listen to fine quality organ music day or night. I have only the highest praise for Brent and those who helped him get OrganLive off the ground and improved to the quality it is today. If you haven't listened to this station try it and decide for yourself if you feel as I do about supporting this service.  
(back) Subject: Re: [LONG] Lawn mowers, middle age, and pilgrimages, Part 1 of 2 From: <OMusic@aol.com> Date: Sat, 14 Aug 2004 23:45:50 EDT   Thanks for part 1. Talk Rick into a riding mower. Right now our solution = to mowing the lawn is a 20 year old grandson living with us until he gets settled into a job (long story). I always enjoy your posts, Glenda. Lee  
(back) Subject: Organs and Organists online update August 15th From: "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr> Date: Sun, 15 Aug 2004 09:25:15 +0300   We have added a link to the First United Methodist Church of Austin, = Texas, where Scott Davis is organist and choirmaster. This elegantly presented = site includes music downloads of the choir singing what is mainly fairly modern English music; Benjamin Britten's "Ceremony of Carols", and works by John Rutter, John Gardner and Hans Leo Hassler. Webmaster and list member Tim Grenz's 14 year old son Jared has joined us, and uploaded the Bach Chorale Prelude "Herzlich tut mich verlangen" - BWV 727. on the Van Daalen organ of First United Methodist Church, Barron, Wisconsin. It's beautiful playing for a boy of 14. I gather that Doug Marshall's performance of the Bach D major holds the number 1 spot for listening in their houshold - "Were it a 45, it would be worn out by now!" We have now had over 3,000 visitors to the site since the beginning of = July, and over 2,000 to the downloads page. Thank you for your support. John Foss http://www.organsandorganistsonline.com/ http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/ Topic of the week - The Olympic Games      
(back) Subject: Re: And I thought Swedes were vegetables From: "Harry Grove" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> Date: Sun, 15 Aug 2004 07:37:18 +0100   Oi Veh !   You talk of Swedes and Organs ....... !   In this country, enough, already.   Harry Grove [a.k.a. musicman - and only intelligible to those living this side of the |Atlantic]     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, August 14, 2004 6:01 PM Subject: Re: And I thought Swedes were vegetables