PipeChat Digest #4701 - Thursday, August 19, 2004
 
Re: Allen organs
  by <Steskinner@aol.com>
Re: Monty's Trinity Trip
  by "Mattcinnj" <mattcinnj@yahoo.com>
Re: Allen organs
  by "Richard Hazelip" <rhazelip1@yahoo.com>
Re: FELIX HELL AT BOSTON SYMPHONY HALL
  by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
small pipe organs (again)
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Allen organs
  by "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net>
Re: Langlais' Four Postludes
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
electronic organs
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Networked Organ Systems (X-Posted)
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Florida Organs
  by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
why there are no organists
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Allen organs From: <Steskinner@aol.com> Date: Thu, 19 Aug 2004 07:02:46 EDT   In a message dated 8/18/2004 9:17:14 PM Eastern Standard Time, rhazelip1@yahoo.com writes: However, with money being the significant barrier it is at our church, I would rather have a wide palette of reasonably authentic-sounding choices = over an "affordable" instrument of fifteen to twenty ranks. Perhaps a better question to ask than "what do I want?" would be "what = will serve the church best?" It is very hard for me to imagine that 20 = judiciously chosen ranks would not serve any church better. I played a year of = weddings at Lake Ave Congregational in Pasadena on a 17 rank Schantz (in a "chapel" = that seated 1200). While the "palette" was limited, the beauty and function of =   what was there were of far greater value than a larger palette of inferior = (pipe or electronic) sound.   20 ranks could roar with authority, whisper with calm, accompany with authenticity, and serve for decades (not even counting further additions). = True, you may have only one oboe and one trumpet, but they could be beautiful, and = the ear of the hearer would never tire of their beauty and authenticity. More =   importanitly, aside from the sound the organ makes, the main JOB of the = organ is to move vibration through air to lead the congregation in their song. = Pipes are the most inexpensive and efficient way to do this.   Steven Skinner Minister of Music First Presbyterian Church of the Covenant Erie, PA  
(back) Subject: Re: Monty's Trinity Trip From: "Mattcinnj" <mattcinnj@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 19 Aug 2004 04:51:40 -0700 (PDT)   Hi Monty and Everyone, Great News !!!!!! Having followed Monty's posts (since they started, I = guess), I'm confident we will get an unbiased, and realistic evaluation of = exactly how the organ sounds. I second his suggestion regarding the use = of high quality headphones in evaluating the CD ........ to hear the = various mechanical sounds. Matt   RMB10@aol.com wrote: .. Several list members have heard the Trinity Wall Street organ first hand = and I am planning on going to see it at the end of the month or first part of Sept., so when I come back, I will give a full report. Having talked to = people who have played it and heard it in person, everyone raves about the organ, =   including some pipe organ builders!   Monty Bennett       ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: List-Digest: List-Unsubscribe:     --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Read only the mail you want - Yahoo! Mail SpamGuard.
(back) Subject: Re: Allen organs From: "Richard Hazelip" <rhazelip1@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 19 Aug 2004 04:54:20 -0700 (PDT)   I want what any church wants: quality music. I know from experience that = eclecticism serves my community more effectively than any prospective = instrument with a limited (albeit lovely) set of built-in limitations. I = play anything from early Spanish through French classic, Herbert Howells, = Hovanhess, Sowerby, and many others from a fairly wide spectrum of organ = literature. In my experience, those instruments (such as the Noack at = Christ the King Lutheran in Houston) that are built along specific lines = are absolutely wonderful for what they do, but they don't do much else = well. Of course, C the K is designed specifically to be the German = Lutheran church with that style of music, so the organ is a perfect match. =   FWIW at 7 AM! Richard   Steskinner@aol.com wrote: In a message dated 8/18/2004 9:17:14 PM Eastern Standard Time, = rhazelip1@yahoo.com writes: However, with money being the significant barrier it is at our church, I = would rather have a wide palette of reasonably authentic-sounding choices = over an "affordable" instrument of fifteen to twenty ranks. Perhaps a better question to ask than "what do I want?" would be "what = will serve the church best?" It is very hard for me to imagine that 20 = judiciously chosen ranks would not serve any church better. I played a = year of weddings at Lake Ave Congregational in Pasadena on a 17 rank = Schantz (in a "chapel" that seated 1200). While the "palette" was = limited, the beauty and function of what was there were of far greater = value than a larger palette of inferior (pipe or electronic) sound. 20 ranks could roar with authority, whisper with calm, accompany with = authenticity, and serve for decades (not even counting further additions). = True, you may have only one oboe and one trumpet, but they could be = beautiful, and the ear of the hearer would never tire of their beauty and = authenticity. More importanitly, aside from the sound the organ makes, = the main JOB of the organ is to move vibration through air to lead the = congregation in their song. Pipes are the most inexpensive and efficient = way to do this. Steven Skinner Minister of Music First Presbyterian Church of the Covenant Erie, PA  
(back) Subject: Re: FELIX HELL AT BOSTON SYMPHONY HALL From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Thu, 19 Aug 2004 08:47:56 -0600   Hello, PipeChatters:   Subject: FELIX HELL AT BOSTON SYMPHONY HALL     > this is to announce that, under the patronage of the new Music Director > of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Maestro James Levine, the newly > refurbished Aeolian Skinner Organ of Boston Symphony Hall will be > celebrated on November 7, 2004   .. . .NOW, THESE areconcerts of which I would love to have a CD recording.   Boston is a bit of a strain to get to from Dallas. <grins>   Appreciatively, F. Richard Burt     ..      
(back) Subject: small pipe organs (again) From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Thu, 19 Aug 2004 07:17:07 -0700   But the POINT is that a finely-voiced pipe organ of 15-20 ranks/stops can DO all of that.   I used to sub every summer at my friend's LCMS, which has a Schlicker (voiced by Rosales) with the following disposition:   POSITIV   8' Rohrfloete 8' Salicional (8' Celeste) (4' Principal) 4' Flute 2 2/3' Nazard 2' Principal 1 3/5' Tierce Zimbel mixture 8' Schalmei (8' Spanische Trompete) Tremulant Postiv 16-4   GREAT   (16' Quintadena) 8' Principal 8' Gedackt (8' Gemshorn) 4' Octave 4' Flute 2' Octave Mixture 16' Dulcian (8' Trumpet)   Gt 16-4 Sw/Gt 16-8-4   PEDAL   (32' Contra Bourdon - 1-12 electronic; rest from 16' Subbass) 16' Principal 16' Subbass (16' Quintadena - gt) 8' Octave (8' Flute) 4' Choralbass Rauschpfeife II 16' Posaune (16' Dulcian - gt) 8' Trumpet - 12 pipes 4' Clarion - 12 pipes   Sw/Ped Gt/Ped   The stops in parenthesis were added to celebrate my friend's 25th anniversary as Cantor; the Positiv was originally unenclosed; it was later enclosed (except for the Spanische Trompete, which silences the Positiv stops, but allows them to couple to the Great; the Spanische Trompete doesn't couple).   The organ is encased and elevated in the west end of an excellent room that seats about 700; the church is full most Sundays. 28 stops is a little larger than our hypothetical organ of 15-20 stops, but, despite the very Germanic-looking stoplist, one could play just about ANYTHING on it. I played movements of the Vierne 1st Symphonie and the Vierne Clair de Lune; I also played the Reger Introduction and Passacaglia, and the Messiaen Le Banquet Celeste.   I also played Clavieruebung III there for their annual Bachfest.   SIZE doesn't matter; voicing, scaling, and placement DOES. That is driven home every year at the OHS convention. Time after time, people are AMAZED by the versatility of small organs that look EXTREMELY limited ON PAPER.   With respect, the choice of a CHURCH organ should be PRIMARILY about accompanying the SERVICE, and only SECONDARILY about the organist's repertoire.   Cheers,   Bud     Richard Hazelip wrote:   > I want what any church wants: quality music. I know from experience > that eclecticism serves my community more effectively than any > prospective instrument with a limited (albeit lovely) set of built-in > limitations. I play anything from early Spanish through French classic, =   > Herbert Howells, Hovanhess, Sowerby, and many others from a fairly wide > spectrum of organ literature. In my experience, those instruments (such =   > as the Noack at Christ the King Lutheran in Houston) that are built > along specific lines are absolutely wonderful for what they do, but they =   > don't do much else well. Of course, C the K is designed specifically to > be the German Lutheran church with that style of music, so the organ is > a perfect match. > > FWIW at 7 AM! > > Richard > > Steskinner@aol.com wrote: > > In a message dated 8/18/2004 9:17:14 PM Eastern Standard Time, > rhazelip1@yahoo.com writes: > > However, with money being the significant barrier it is at our > church, I would rather have a wide palette of reasonably > authentic-sounding choices over an "affordable" instrument of > fifteen to twenty ranks. > > Perhaps a better question to ask than "what do I want?" would be > "what will serve the church best?" It is very hard for me to > imagine that 20 judiciously chosen ranks would not serve any church > better. I played a year of weddings at Lake Ave Congregational in > Pasadena on a 17 rank Schantz (in a "chapel" that seated 1200). > While the "palette" was limited, the beauty and function of what was > there were of far greater value than a larger palette of inferior > (pipe or electronic) sound. > > 20 ranks could roar with authority, whisper with calm, accompany > with authenticity, and serve for decades (not even counting further > additions). True, you may have only one oboe and one trumpet, but > they could be beautiful, and the ear of the hearer would never tire > of their beauty and authenticity. More importanitly, aside from the > sound the organ makes, the main JOB of the organ is to move > vibration through air to lead the congregation in their song. Pipes > are the most inexpensive and efficient way to do this. > > Steven Skinner > Minister of Music > First Presbyterian Church of the Covenant > Erie, PA >      
(back) Subject: Re: Allen organs From: "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net> Date: Thu, 19 Aug 2004 10:45:05 -0400   Could not copy the message to the digest, there was no plain text part
(back) Subject: Re: Langlais' Four Postludes From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 19 Aug 2004 11:04:25 -0400   On 8/18/04 8:07 PM, "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> wrote:   > Was there supposed to be a message in this someplace, Alan? > I don't know what happened. Lousy eyes: I must have hit "Reply" instead = of "Delete." Commentary on French organ literature is NOT my strong suit!   Alan    
(back) Subject: electronic organs From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Thu, 19 Aug 2004 08:07:50 -0700   What Stephen said (grin).   At various times, I worked for both Allen and Rodgers, doing installation and voicing. As with pipe organs, the time for voicing and tonal finishing in the church has to be built into the contract. We simply included that in our bid ... we would NEVER put an "out-of-the-box" organ into a church without doing at least SOME tweaking of the voicing.   Another point: virtually NO electronic organ comes with an adequate array of speakers and amps as standard equipment. We put a Rodgers 750 analog into a church with decent acoustics; we put FOUR TIMES the minimum complement of amps and speakers into that installation ... a complete double set in the front of the church, and another in the back. We spent the better part of a week voicing that organ. We also added a reed driver and one of those big Rodgers wooden acoustical horns to the back organ for the Swell reeds and the party horn.   St. Matthew's was built with a HUGE organ chamber for the pipe organ; when we moved the old Allen 301-C into the new church, it positively came ALIVE ... the speakers in the chamber were aimed every which way; NONE faced the congregation. That's another trick that a lot of electronic organ salesman will resist, for some reason.   There were no chambers available in that church with the Rodgers 750, so we hung the speakers on the back wall, but at all different angles. The speakers for the front organ were placed on the second roof-beam out from the chancel facing east, so the sound bounced off the east wall before reaching the congregation. Of the two, the front organ sounded better when played alone.   There ARE things that can be done to improve the sound of an electronic organ, but it takes patience and a tech who's willing to do it.   Cheers,   Bud          
(back) Subject: Re: Networked Organ Systems (X-Posted) From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Thu, 19 Aug 2004 11:14:47 EDT   In a message dated 8/18/2004 2:33:36 PM Eastern Standard Time, Devon3000@aol.com writes:   > for the sound, and this is my own opinion only, it mostly sounded like = any > well-voiced Allen Renaissance   still waiting to hear one of these.....   dale in florida  
(back) Subject: Florida Organs From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Thu, 19 Aug 2004 10:40:04 -0600   Good Morning, Dale: =20 Have you had an opportunity to gather any data=20 on the condition of the church buildings and=20 the organs, yet? Was Hurrican Charlie as rough=20 on the church buildings as it was on the rest=20 of the structures featured on TV? =20 F. Richard Burt =20 =20 ..
(back) Subject: why there are no organists From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Thu, 19 Aug 2004 09:02:22 -0700   Here is a sampling of jobs posted on the San Diego AGO website. Note the duties, hours per week, and the salaries (if given).   Apparently prep time isn't taken into consideration.   Cheers,   Bud   ---------------------------------------------------   DIRECTOR OF MUSIC   Our ever-growing 700-member family church with a strong tradition of music and liturgy seeks a part-time, experienced organist/keyboardist and director for adult choir (with paid section leaders) to start as soon as possible. Salary in the $20K+ range. Send resume to Music Director Search Committee, St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, 890 Balour Drive, Encinitas, CA 92024, fax to (760) 753-3017, or email as text, PDF, or Word document to contact@standrewsepiscopal.org Job Description   Position   Director Of Music   Reports To   Rector, Fr. Wesley Hills   Normal Place of Work   St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Encinitas, CA   Overall   To co-ordinate the total music program of the church, and to provide choral direction and keyboard accompaniment, in a manner that enhances the spirit of worship and assists the congregation to praise and serve = God.   Remuneration   In the region of $20,000 per year.   Benefits   Six weeks of paid leave, agreed and arranged in advance with the Rector.   Work Hours   Part-time position. Includes, but is not limited to:   - Adult Choir rehearsals at St. Andrew's on Thursday evenings and before choral services on Sunday.   - Preparation for, playing at, and tidying-up after, choral services on Sunday and other seasonal observances as directed.   - Administration of Adult Choir.   - Attendance at monthly Worship Committee meetings, and occasional staff and Vestry meetings upon request.   Starting   As soon as possible Outline   St. Andrew's Episcopal Church has a well-established and active church community of over 700 people, which continues to grow every year. Currently, there are three main services each week:   - An alternative music service on Saturday evening attended by about 40-50 people.   - A said Eucharist at 8.00 a.m. on Sunday, attended by about 20-30 parishioners.   - A choral Family Eucharist at 10:00 a.m. on Sunday attended by about 250 parishioners (about 400 on main Feast Days), including 70 children coming in from Sunday School part way through the service.   St. Andrew's has three choirs: the Cherub Choir for young children, and the Young People's Choir for older children (each having its own Director), and the Adult Choir. The Adult Choir has about 20 members, with four paid section leaders.   The two primary responsibilities of the Director of Music is the Adult Choir, and the musical and choral facets of the 10:00 a.m. Sunday service. Liturgical Duties   - Select music (hymns and anthems) for the worship service appropriate to lectionary themes and liturgical season.   - Provide keyboard accompaniment for any choral service and seasonal observance.   - Select, prepare, and play preludes and postludes at any choral service and seasonal observances.   - Plan special liturgies in co-operation with the Rector and the Worship Committee.   - Work with parishioners and their families in the selection and performance of music at special events such as weddings and funerals. An honorarium is typically given for this.   - Stimulate congregational participation in music, and teaching new music to members in worship as requested.   - Field parishioners' questions and concerns related to music and choir matters. Administrative Duties   - Submit a list of the music selections for each choral service in a timely manner to the church office.   - Proofread the music listings in service bulletins.   - Prepare music budget and manages music line items.   - Submit requisitions for printed music, supplies and choir = robes.   - Participate in Worship Committee meetings. Attend Vestry and staff meetings upon request.   - Arrange for instrument maintenance, repair, and tuning.   - Co-ordinate music performances with the Young People's and Cherub Choir directors.   - Promote the growth and stability of all choirs, and lend support to musicians who play at any service.   - Arrange for, and prepare detailed instructions for, temporary or substitute organists and/or piano players as required.   - Maintain the music library.   - Write relevant music news items for the monthly church newsletter and/or for service bulletins.   - Manage the St. Cecilia's fund and any associated activity. Adult Choir Duties   - Audition, hire, train, and supervise section leaders.   - Submit monthly pay requests in a timely manner to the church Office for section leaders.   - Develop the musical skills of Adult Choir members through weekly rehearsals, coaching, etc.   - Direct the Adult Choir for any Sunday choral service, and for all seasonal observances (for example, Advent, Christmas, Lent, and Holy Week).   - Nurture choir members and work at team-building among the = group.   - Work with current members to recruit new members.   - Maintain roster of choir members, including addresses, contact telephone numbers and e-mail addresses, vestment and music assignments.   - Contact members who are absent, ill, or in crisis. Music Education and Outreach   - Plan and direct special concerts and/or services as determined by the Rector and relevant musicians.   - Plan and distribute publicity materials for such events.   - Notify the parish of special music events and opportunities in the community. Continuing Education   - Study and practice to further develop music skills.   - Maintain membership in relevant professional organization and serve on professional committees and commissions as appropriate.   - Attend conferences of relevant professional organizations to promote personal growth, networking with colleagues to share ideas and concerns. Other Duties   Other duties may be assigned by the Rector from time to time. Skills Required   - Knowledge of both choral and keyboard church music appropriate for traditional Choral Eucharist.   - Ability to play piano and organ proficiently and to improve appropriately.   - Instructional competency in teaching music to volunteer singers of all ages, along with paid section leaders.   - Understanding of liturgy's meaning and the role of music in worship services.   - Appreciation for the worship style and music of the various services in this parish.     ----------------------------------------------------------   Graham Memorial Presbyterian 959 C Avenue Coronado, CA 92118   Provide leadership and direction for the music program of the church involving Chancel Choir with section leaders, Youth Choirs, Kirk Handbell Ringers and "The Ensemble." Part time position, approx. 20 hours per week. Please send resumes to the church, attention Personnel Committee.   ----------------------------------------------------------------   First United Methodist Church of Chula Vista. Rehearsals on Monday and Thursday nights; up to 3 worship services on Sundays, some computer expertise; Christmas, Easter and early summer programs, other services as required. Some experience in contemporary praise and worship music needed. Salary negotiable around $30,000/year. Please direct all inquiries and send resumes to Carolyn Terpstra c/o the church at 915 Paseo Ranchero, Chula Vista, CA 91910-7728   -----------------------------------------------------------------------   St.Patrick's Church; Carlsbad, CA Position available in an active family parish of 3,600 members. Responsibilities include Sunday liturgies with choir (Thursday rehearsal) and special liturgies as needed. Candidate should be highly skilled organist/pianist familiar with Catholic liturgy (both traditional and contemporary styles of music). Reports to Director of Music and works collaboratively with staff musicians. Music degree or equivalent experience required. Salary ($13,000 to $15,000) commensurate with qualifications and experience. Funerals and weddings extra. 2 Manuel Allen. Send r=E9sum=E9 to Kathleen O'Brien, Director of Music, kobrien@miracosta.edu or call 760.722.0565 for further information.   ---------------------------------------------------------------