PipeChat Digest #4703 - Friday, August 20, 2004
 
Re: why there are no organists
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
RE: why there are no organists
  by "Peter Harrison" <peter@phmusic.co.uk>
RE: USA Nat'l Anthem at Olympics
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
Re: toe levers - tiraripieno
  by "Domitila Ballesteros" <dballesteros@uol.com.br>
salaries and jobs
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: toe levers - tiraripieno (tiratutti?)
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: USA Nat'l Anthem at Olympics
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: National Anthem in Athens
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: Networked Organ Systems
  by "John Jarvis" <JLJarvis@comcast.net>
Re: toe levers - tiraripieno (tiratutti?)
  by "John Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: USA Nat'l Anthem at Olympics
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
Re: FELIX HELL AT BOSTON SYMPHONY HALL
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
Re: Florida Organs
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: electronic organs
  by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
RE: USA Nat'l Anthem at Olympics
  by "Shawn M. Gingrich" <shawn.gingrich@firstumchershey.org>
Re: toe levers - tiraripieno (tiratutti?)
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: Re: why there are no organists From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Thu, 19 Aug 2004 13:34:50 EDT   Shelley and Bud et alia,   I didn't get into this profession to get rich, I got into it because I = LOVED it. I never expected to do so. I expected to compose music and conduct orchestras, both of which I did while keeping up church jobs and studying = in Michigan, Vienna and Moscow. In time, I "married up" (financially, not = socially, and not on purpose) and worked and worked and studied and studied to land a decent job; however, I do believe in being paid a living wage for what = one does--be it 1/4 time, 1/2 time, 3/4 time or full time--is important. And = I rely on our professional Guild (which I often call a "Union", to make the point) = to see that our compensation, contracts and other agreements about working conditions are up to "industry standard". I was fortunate to land in a = position where I have a good job which pays less than I would like, and a kind spouse who = is excited by what I do and wouldn't dream of shattering this vision: right = now, it pays the rent. The pay-cut I took to work where I now work was a source = of humility for me, and a source of pride for my family and friends. To = paraphrase Martin Luther, I could "do no other".   I am currently underpaid for what I do yet paid according to AGO standards =   for the kind of work that I do at a very historical Church which I enjoy serving.   While I think that our Guild could do better, I hate to think what we = would be paid without it, and the contracts it can provide, but cannot insist = upon. Which is why I, personally, think it wouldn't hurt to formally = unionize--that is, if we all did it, together, all at once.   I have earned more, and I have earned less, than I do at my current job. However, I've never been treated more fairly than at St. John's. I've also = never had more fun making music, nor been so honestly entreated to make use of = my compositional skills which have been deeply appreciated both by our parish = and by several prominent Anglican Bishops.   If we really want to force this issue, we need to unionize. And, be fair = to fair parishes paying fair wages who give fair contracts and appreciate = what we do, whilst convincing others that fair is fair, actual unionization is not = a bad idea. Yet, let's not forget those parishes who appreciate their = musicians, pay them almost fairly, and could not function liturgically without a = proper organist and choirmaster.   Pax, Bill H. SJE, Boston.  
(back) Subject: RE: why there are no organists From: "Peter Harrison" <peter@phmusic.co.uk> Date: Thu, 19 Aug 2004 18:59:34 +0100   The rewards certainly look very attractive and if there were not work = permit issues, no doubt you could encourage many of us UK based church musicians = to apply. I'm therefore not entirely sure I understand the point being made = as packages such as that if offered in the UK would go a long way to = addressing our shortage of church musicians.   Peter M Harrison Emmanuel Church, Holcombe, Lancs, GB www.emmanuel.rammy.com & P H M : P O Box 383 : Bury : BL8 4WX : GB tel 07799 62 1954 / 01204 887161 web: www.phmusic.co.uk <http://www.phmusic.co.uk>             ------------------------- Subject: why there are no organists From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Thu, 19 Aug 2004 09:02:22 -0700   Here is a sampling of jobs posted on the San Diego AGO website. Note the duties, hours per week, and the salaries (if given).   Apparently prep time isn't taken into consideration.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: RE: USA Nat'l Anthem at Olympics From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Thu, 19 Aug 2004 20:30:25 +0100   I quite agree Karl. The orchestration goes from "rather feeble" at the beginning to "totally whispy" in the penultimate section. I was = remarking on it this afternoon at the men's backstroke presentation! The pianissimo string section almost disappears completely! What the reason for this = is, I couldn't possibly comment on, being a mere Brit!   Will Light Coventry UK     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of = Karl Moyer Sent: 19 August 2004 18:05 To: Anglican-music; pipechat; organchat Subject: USA Nat'l Anthem at Olympics   Is it just my wife and I, or is the version of the USA national anthem = being played at the Olympics sorta "strange?" It reminds us of Phil Spitalni = and his all-girl orchestra!!   Is it perhaps an attempt to counter-act the rather militaristic and aggressive attitude which the USA seems to portray these days to much of = the rest of the world? (I hope NOT to engender conversation about this statement. I have been in close contact in recent months with some of = the rest of the world, including spending two months in Europe, and the Europeans do seem to sense America and especially the Bush = administration as super-aggressive.)=20   Conversely, I've been more than thankful to see American athletes = SINGING as the anthem is played, though I do not find the music a very stirring = sort of encouragement for singing.   Just wondering.   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA     ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>    
(back) Subject: Re: toe levers - tiraripieno From: "Domitila Ballesteros" <dballesteros@uol.com.br> Date: Thu, 19 Aug 2004 17:43:11 -0300   But I'm not still understanting when he says "based on the stop action of spring chest" and "have been pulled 1/4 turn".   'Italian aids to registration are based on the stop action of spring chest, such as toe levers for a plenum registration and for ranks whose stop knobs have been pulled 1/4 turn ( a kind offree combination). Such devices were useful in an organwith only one manual werk" (Andersen, p. 119).   Gfc234@aol.com wrote:   > In a message dated 8/19/2004 12:09:54 PM Central Daylight Time, > dballesteros@uol.com.br writes: > > This is a wonderful! > In this site I found two types of tiraripieno. There are by > pedals, abd > by hans (manivela) > There are so many, many beautiful and useful photos. > But I still wait for you help, because I still can to understand = what > works this device. > > The stop knobs on some of these organs may be turned to the right so > that they may be activated by the pedal. So..for example, the > organist may select his registration during mass (by turning the stop > knobs), and when it is time to play, he steps on one pedal-which > forces out all of the stop knobs that he selected. The Flentrop at > Holy Name Cath. in Chicago has this system. > > = ___________________________________________________________________________= ____________ > _______________________________________________________________________ > ________________________________________________ > _______________________________ > ________________ > Gregory Francis Ceurvorst > 1921 Sherman Avenue # GS > Evanston, IL 60201 > 847.332.2788 home/fax > 708.243.2549 mobile > Home Email: gfc234@aol.com <mailto:gfc234@aol.com> > Mobile Email: gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net > <mailto:gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net>      
(back) Subject: salaries and jobs From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Thu, 19 Aug 2004 13:56:33 -0700   I point to the San Diego listings because I know the churches and what's ACTUALLY involved in doing the jobs ... FAR more work than they're PAYING for.   Time and again I have taken low-paying jobs because of the liturgy (primarily) or because the place had a good choir and organ. For most of my career, I worked a "day job" to make ends meet.   Why should a professional organist/choirmaster have to do that? Clergy (for the most part) don't, and I worked at LEAST as hard as the clergy in ALL my posts.   Or why should the organist be paid $35K in a parish where the median income is well in excess of $100K (including the rector's salary)?   I was often criticized for not "dressing up" at St. Matthew's (I usually wore a cassock around the place to hide my threadbare clothes), and for driving an old beater of a car. My response? "If you want me to live a Newport Beach LIFESTYLE and project a Newport Beach IMAGE, then you need to pay me a Newport Beach SALARY. I'm supporting a family of four on an annual salary of $35K; I doubt if ANYBODY in the CONGREGATION has to do THAT." And I WAS "full-time" ... I had to be available for meetings, weddings, and funerals (and other services) during the day, so I COULDN'T take a "day job."   I stayed because of the liturgy and the choir, until the rector became absolutely intolerable and the situation started to affect my health. So I retired.   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: toe levers - tiraripieno (tiratutti?) From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Thu, 19 Aug 2004 14:04:10 -0700   The Fisk/Flentrop at Mt. Calvary in Baltimore, Maryland has such an arrangement ... there are composition pedals for the left and right stop-jamba; the names of the stops are on ivory plates above each knob; the knob itself has a small ivory bar inset; when the bar is vertical, the stop is locked onto the composition pedal; when the knob is given a quarter turn so the bar is horizontal, the stop ISN'T locked onto the composition pedal (it's been a long time since I played that organ; I may have it backwards).   I'm not quite sure why Andersen associates such a "free composition pedal" with Italian spring chests ... I've seen several such stop controls applied to normal slider chests.   In the 19th century Koehnken & Grimm we restoring in Cincinnati, one could reach inside the right-hand front case panel and "adjust" the composition pedals by inserting or removing brass pins in the linkage.   19th century American organs typically had two or three composition pedals for each manual: piano, (mezzo), and forte ... they were usually double-acting ... pressing the "piano" pedal withdrew everything but a couple of soft 8' stops.   Cheers,   Bud   Domitila Ballesteros wrote:   > But I'm not still understanting when he says "based on the stop action > of spring chest" and "have been pulled 1/4 turn". > > 'Italian aids to registration are based on the stop action of spring > chest, such as toe levers for a plenum registration and for ranks whose > stop knobs have been pulled 1/4 turn ( a kind offree combination). Such =   > devices were useful in an organwith only one manual werk" (Andersen, p. > 119). > > Gfc234@aol.com wrote: > >> In a message dated 8/19/2004 12:09:54 PM Central Daylight Time, >> dballesteros@uol.com.br writes: >> >> This is a wonderful! >> In this site I found two types of tiraripieno. There are by >> pedals, abd >> by hans (manivela) >> There are so many, many beautiful and useful photos. >> But I still wait for you help, because I still can to understand = what >> works this device. >> >> The stop knobs on some of these organs may be turned to the right so >> that they may be activated by the pedal. So..for example, the >> organist may select his registration during mass (by turning the stop >> knobs), and when it is time to play, he steps on one pedal-which >> forces out all of the stop knobs that he selected. The Flentrop at >> Holy Name Cath. in Chicago has this system. >> >> = ___________________________________________________________________________= ____________ >> _______________________________________________________________________ >> ________________________________________________ >> _______________________________ >> ________________ >> Gregory Francis Ceurvorst >> 1921 Sherman Avenue # GS >> Evanston, IL 60201 >> 847.332.2788 home/fax >> 708.243.2549 mobile >> Home Email: gfc234@aol.com <mailto:gfc234@aol.com> >> Mobile Email: gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net >> <mailto:gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net> > >      
(back) Subject: Re: USA Nat'l Anthem at Olympics From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 19 Aug 2004 17:13:04 -0400   Hi Karl,   There was actually a piece in the NY Times this morning saying just what = you have said - that the SSB is being played with strings only, in a very non triumphalist way. Apparently, there have been many instances in which American athletes have been roundly booed just for appearing.   Hopefully, we can do something about that in November. - There, I've said it! ----- Original Message ----- From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> To: "Anglican-music" <anglican-music@list.stsams.org>; "pipechat" <pipechat@pipechat.org>; "organchat" <organchat@egroups.com> Sent: Thursday, August 19, 2004 1:04 PM Subject: USA Nat'l Anthem at Olympics     > Is it just my wife and I, or is the version of the USA national anthem being > played at the Olympics sorta "strange?" It reminds us of Phil Spitalni and > his all-girl orchestra!! > > Is it perhaps an attempt to counter-act the rather militaristic and > aggressive attitude which the USA seems to portray these days to much of the > rest of the world? (I hope NOT to engender conversation about this > statement. I have been in close contact in recent months with some of = the > rest of the world, including spending two months in Europe, and the > Europeans do seem to sense America and especially the Bush = administration as > super-aggressive.) > > Conversely, I've been more than thankful to see American athletes = SINGING as > the anthem is played, though I do not find the music a very stirring = sort of > encouragement for singing. > > Just wondering. > > Karl E. Moyer > Lancaster PA > >      
(back) Subject: Re: National Anthem in Athens From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 19 Aug 2004 17:16:43 -0400   Sorry List,   My reply to Karl's posting on the above subject was not meant to go unsigned. It slipped away from me.   Cheers,   Malcolm - who is not old enough to have heard Phil Spitalni and his All = Girl Orchestra!   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> To: "Anglican-music" <anglican-music@list.stsams.org>; "pipechat" <pipechat@pipechat.org>; "organchat" <organchat@egroups.com> Sent: Thursday, August 19, 2004 1:04 PM Subject: USA Nat'l Anthem at Olympics     > Is it just my wife and I, or is the version of the USA national anthem being > played at the Olympics sorta "strange?" It reminds us of Phil Spitalni and > his all-girl orchestra!! > > Is it perhaps an attempt to counter-act the rather militaristic and > aggressive attitude which the USA seems to portray these days to much of the > rest of the world? (I hope NOT to engender conversation about this > statement. I have been in close contact in recent months with some of = the > rest of the world, including spending two months in Europe, and the > Europeans do seem to sense America and especially the Bush = administration as > super-aggressive.) > > Conversely, I've been more than thankful to see American athletes = SINGING as > the anthem is played, though I do not find the music a very stirring = sort of > encouragement for singing. > > Just wondering. > > Karl E. Moyer > Lancaster PA > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Networked Organ Systems From: "John Jarvis" <JLJarvis@comcast.net> Date: Thu, 19 Aug 2004 14:17:07 -0700   I worked in the computer industry for many years before retiring to = teach music in the High School. Most of the computer equipment sold to = businesses that fall into the price range of these large electronic organ ($50K or more), have the capability to constantly monitor themselves - looking = for hardware / firmware / software problems. If the self monitoring reports anything that looks suspicious, the computer hardware (Servers, disk = storage and etc.) phone's home to the manufacture to report the problem. In = many cases a repairman is able to show up with a part to fix a potential = problem that the customer has not even experienced yet. Additionally, most manufactures have had the ability to diagnose and solve problems in the software and / or firmware by downloading new patches from the = manufacture over a telephone line. =20   =20   Redundant Arrays of Internal Disk Drives (sometimes called RAID) allows = for a drive to fail and not take the entire computer system down. This is = done in several different ways with the most basic being a 2nd drive that contains exactly the same items as the failing drive. It would seem = that with the low cost of disk storage devices today and the large amounts of money that these electronic organs are able to command, that a redundant disk or three would be installed. Anything electronic that moves will eventually fail such as a disk drive. I think self diagnosis with phone home reporting is a minimum feature that we should require from the = organ manufactures. =20   =20   I often laugh at the comments of sales reps for companies like Allen, Rodgers, Phoenix, Johannus and etc. They go on about using the "latest" technology when in fact they don't even provide basic technology that = has been around in the computer industry for at least 10 years or more. = These companies produce enough products each year to justify us asking them to implement these sorts of systems. =20   =20   OK, I'll get off my soap box and go back into my hole.   Cheers   JJ    
(back) Subject: Re: toe levers - tiraripieno (tiratutti?) From: "John Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Thu, 19 Aug 2004 14:28:04 -0700 (PDT)   Cavaille-Coll used a similar arrangement on some of his organs, and I = believe there is or used to be adjustable composition pedals like this on = the Farnborough Abbey organ in Hampshire. They are very convenient to = use. The only drawback is that it is only possible to have one or two of = them on an organ. John Speller   Liquescent <quilisma@cox.net> wrote:   The Fisk/Flentrop at Mt. Calvary in Baltimore, Maryland has such an arrangement ... there are composition pedals for the left and right stop-jamba; the names of the stops are on ivory plates above each knob; the knob itself has a small ivory bar inset; when the bar is vertical, the stop is locked onto the composition pedal; when the knob is given a quarter turn so the bar is horizontal, the stop ISN'T locked onto the composition pedal (it's been a long time since I played that organ; I may have it backwards).    
(back) Subject: Re: USA Nat'l Anthem at Olympics From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Thu, 19 Aug 2004 18:35:30 EDT   In a message dated 8/19/04 1:06:36 PM Eastern Daylight Time, kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu writes:   << Is it just my wife and I, or is the version of the USA national anthem being played at the Olympics sorta "strange?" >>   It does sound different than what we're used to hearing here at home. Probably the groups that play it the most are military bands (who are only = allowed to perform one authorized version), and when a high school or community = band wants it, they usually contact the military to get a set of parts, so you = again hear the same version. Many orchestras use an arrangement by J.P. Sousa, which not surprisingly, also sounds rather "band-like" (gee, I wonder = why.....). After having spent a whole bunch of years in one of the military bands in = the DC area, performing the only authorized version hundreds of times a year, = I find it a interesting experience to hear a version which is not quite so bombastic.   Richard Spittel Baltimore, MD  
(back) Subject: Re: FELIX HELL AT BOSTON SYMPHONY HALL From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Thu, 19 Aug 2004 19:00:04 EDT   under the patronage of the new Music Director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Maestro James Levine,   Did Osawa retire? resign?   I guess I was on Planet Zenon and didn't hear.   Neil Brown  
(back) Subject: Re: Florida Organs From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Thu, 19 Aug 2004 19:08:27 EDT   Hi there,   so far only the guitar churches have been hurt with the exception of an = ELCA in Port Charlotte BUT i have not traveled into the heart of it all in = Punta Gorda where everything is hurt.   7 of the school districts 21 schools are to be razed next week------   gotta be more churches with problems.   dale  
(back) Subject: Re: electronic organs From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Thu, 19 Aug 2004 19:30:07 -0600   Hello, Stephen, et al:   You observed quite nicely:   > What Bud doesn't mention is the capacity of the individual who does the > tonal finishing/.voicing. Not every pipe organ technician/worker can do > tonal finishing/voicing. I have also observed that not every electronc > organ salesman can do tonal finishing/voicing.   That is quite true. Alas, many of these people have excellent understanding of Ohm's law and higher levels of electronic theory and applications. What is lacking is their understanding of how pipes sound and how they (properly) blend together to make a musical organ ensemble.   So, how does one correct this deficiency?   > I remain concern that there's no corporate overseeing of what > the electronic organ installers do out in the field, not even in > large instruments.   Back to Economics 101: If the factory has to oversee all of the hundreds of installations done each year, the price of the organs will rise proportionally to what it costs for those persons to make some business enemies out of the dealers.   In my opinion, the last thing that a dealer wants is for a person from the factory telling him how to run his business, install the organs, or impose another's opinion on how the organs should sound. ALL OF THAT COSTS THE DEALER MONEY, BECAUSE THE FACTORY MUST ADD TO THE COST OF THE ORGAN BEING SOLD.   I believe it is not until the dealer costs the factory money that they take a negative position with the dealer and apply pressure on his contract sales performance requirements. This may not be true in every dealer-factory relationship, but it is basic economics.   * * *   > He should have known better.   Yes, but as long as a music merchant moves sufficient volume of product for the factory, that is a problem (from the factory perspective) only for the dealer to resolve to his own satisfaction with his clientel.   The factories (all of them) have a steady rate of expense demanded of them to stay in business. As long as dealers sell organs, the factory is fed. If the deales don't sell organs and the factory is not receiving sufficient cash flow (the feeding process of business), then things may change between the factory and the dealer.   It is the dealer's responsibility to satisfy the customer. Do that and the factory is satisfied. Then, what is the factory's concern about a customer buying an organ and maybe not knowing if it is suitable/satisfactory for the job of making organ music?   If the customer is ignorant enough and he has no real reason to know that an organ IS or IS NOT performing up to par, then the dealer most likely will not hear a complaint from the customer.   However, if one us, who regard ourselves as "organ builders" sells an organ that doesn't sound right, sound good, or make strong positive musical impressions, then it hurts us badly, and we may never sell another organ.   If you go into a music merchant's store, pick out an instrument, buy it, have it delivered but never ask for the dealer to tonally finish it, then the music merchant is free of further responsibility to the customer because the customer accepted it.   Most of the people at the factory are hourly-paid people who invest some level of competence into the business of building organs and selling them to the dealers. The dealers are the factory's customers. As long as the cash flow is sufficient, then the factory could care less if the organs are ever sold or sound good in a church.   Think about it. Complain if you wish, but if the churches do not know that they are dealing with a local merchant, . . . not the factory (in most cases), then the merchant can "get away with anything the churches will buy."   I am not bitter. I am being realistic in this description.   If you want a better sounding organ, you need to find one of us (dealers) who live or die by installing good sounding organs. I do my very best with every installation to live up to that challenge every day.   Think about it. Think about it. Think about it a lot.   Both a surgeon and a meat market butcher can take out a person's appendix. Which one is better equipped to remove it and leave the patient with a good experience when it is done?   F. Richard Burt Dorian Organs     ..      
(back) Subject: RE: USA Nat'l Anthem at Olympics From: "Shawn M. Gingrich" <shawn.gingrich@firstumchershey.org> Date: Thu, 19 Aug 2004 22:53:54 -0400   I wanted to ask if anyone knew whose harmonization they were using = because I rather like it. I thought I shoudl check recent digests to = see whether anyone else already asked and answered when I found Karl = Moyer's message.=20   Anyone know the answer?   Shawn Gingrich Director of Music Ministry First UMC, Hershey, PA  
(back) Subject: Re: toe levers - tiraripieno (tiratutti?) From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Thu, 19 Aug 2004 20:51:08 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   I used to be organist at a church which had a magnificent sounding J.J.Binns organ; a local Yorkshire builder in the UK, and mainly known for the fact that he re-built the celebrated Schulze instrument at St.Bart's, Armley.   This instrument had THE most elegant pneumatic combination setters, with four stops marked Combination 1 - 4 on each jamb. You drew appropriate stops, pulled out the setter stop-knob and this set the combinations for the combination pedals.   Binns patented the mechanism, and I think there is a diagram of its workings in Sumner's Book, "The Organ."   It really was a fine piece of design, and that particular organ was built in 1876! Remarkably, the instrument has only been re-leathered (in 1964), and so far as I know, still functions well to-day. How's THAT for reliability?   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       --- John Speller <jlspeller@swbell.net> wrote:   > Cavaille-Coll used a similar arrangement on some of > his organs, and I believe there is or used to be > adjustable composition pedals like this on the > Farnborough Abbey organ in Hampshire     _______________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Win 1 of 4,000 free domain names from Yahoo! Enter now. http://promotions.yahoo.com/goldrush