PipeChat Digest #4726 - Sunday, August 29, 2004
 
Keeping bagpipes on the porch
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Municipal organ website launched
  by "Will Scarboro" <whs1325@yahoo.com>
75th Anniversary Broadcast
  by <AEolianSkinner@aol.com>
RE: 75th Anniversary Broadcast
  by "Sam Vause" <vause@cox.net>
RE: Keeping bagpipes on the porch
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
RE: 75th Anniversary Broadcast
  by "Milo R. Shepherd" <mrstwin2@rubberandsteel.com>
Re: 75th Anniversary Broadcast
  by <AEolianSkinner@aol.com>
Re: Keeping bagpipes on the porch
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re: 75th Anniversary Broadcast
  by "Eric McKirdy" <emckirdy@gladstone.uoregon.edu>
Motab Anniversary
  by <DudelK@aol.com>
Re: What's with the bagpipes
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Holland and North Germany
  by "Stephen Roberts" <sroberts01@snet.net>
Organs in Holland and North Germany; a postscript
  by "Stephen Roberts" <sroberts01@snet.net>
RE: Belated announcement of recital
  by "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@earthlink.net>
Re: Belated announcement of recital
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Groningen Holland......Lager than life
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Holland and North Germany
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
a new setting of "Gentle Mary Laid Her Child"
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: What's with the bagpipes
  by "Benjamin A Kolodziej" <bkolodzi@smu.edu>
 

(back) Subject: Keeping bagpipes on the porch From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sun, 29 Aug 2004 07:38:26 EDT   Here at First (Old Scots) Presbyterian Church in the City of New York, = I was told very clearly once that bagpipes are considered "instruments of = war," and are NOT permitted inside the church. I have been in attendance at = several special services during which there were plenty of shins sticking out = beneath kilts, but the bagpipers were invariably kept outside. As I remember, the pipers were all very good and in-tune, bringing = back childhood memories of the police band in Edinburgh. However, most amateur pipers sound like a handfull of alley cats trapped in the spin cycle... As far as wedding repertoire is concerned, back in the late 1970s and early 1980s, I refused to play "Feelings" at many a wedding. I made ONE = exception for popular music: a truly horrible bride insisted that she be presented = by her father while processing to "Send in the Clowns." I seemed to be the = only one who saw the irony in this, and gladly agreed to play it. The couple stiffed me on the wedding fee. I found out later that the marriage ended in acrimonious divorce. My karma ran over their dogma...   SMG   ..  
(back) Subject: Municipal organ website launched From: "Will Scarboro" <whs1325@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 29 Aug 2004 06:35:41 -0700 (PDT)   Dear list members, I am pleased to announce that The American Municipal Pipe Organ Research = Project is now online. I finally tried to figure out how to build a = website and with the space being provided by my ISP I built a website for = my project. It is pretty basic at the moment but I am planning to add more = content as time and resources become available. Leave your public coments = in the guestbook or send me an e-mail with your thoughts and suggestions. =   The address is: http://home.comcast.net/~whscarboro/ There may be a bandwidth limit on this site so if you try to view it and = are unsucessful please try again at a later time. Enjoy the site! Sincerely, Will Scarboro     --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - 50x more storage than other providers!
(back) Subject: 75th Anniversary Broadcast From: <AEolianSkinner@aol.com> Date: Sun, 29 Aug 2004 09:39:37 EDT     Congratulations to the Mormon Tabernacle Choir for 75 years of = broadcasting Music and the Spoken Word. It was a marvelous concert. Richard Elliot played "Praise to the Lord with Cymbals and Drums". They broadcasted the =   broadcast in the Conference Center so they used their new 5 Manual = Schoenstein. It was a marvelous concert. Their final piece was Beethoven's "Halleluja". = That was an interesting piece. They got a past conductor to conduct instead = of Craig Jessop. Overall, it was splendid concert.   Best Regards, Gregory Hinson    
(back) Subject: RE: 75th Anniversary Broadcast From: "Sam Vause" <vause@cox.net> Date: Sun, 29 Aug 2004 07:54:26 -0700   I would have been nice to see an advance notice so one could have planned to listen. Will this be rebroadcast on the Internet soon? --sam   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of AEolianSkinner@aol.com Sent: Sunday, August 29, 2004 6:40 AM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: 75th Anniversary Broadcast       Congratulations to the Mormon Tabernacle Choir for 75 years of broadcasting Music and the Spoken Word. It was a marvelous concert. Richard Elliot played "Praise to the Lord with Cymbals and Drums". They broadcasted the broadcast in the Conference Center so they used their new 5 Manual Schoenstein. It was a marvelous concert. Their final piece was Beethoven's "Halleluja". That was an interesting piece. They got a past conductor to conduct instead of Craig Jessop. Overall, it was splendid concert. Best Regards, Gregory Hinson    
(back) Subject: RE: Keeping bagpipes on the porch From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sun, 29 Aug 2004 09:49:33 -0500   It must be my cutesy-nice that they are complaining about. I will cease and desist posting. But Seb, you put the sparkle in my day with these!   Guess 'Send in the Clowns' is not just for funerals and mothers-in-law anymore!   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of TubaMagna@aol.com   As far as wedding repertoire is concerned, back in the late 1970s and early 1980s, I refused to play "Feelings" at many a wedding. I made ONE exception for popular music: a truly horrible bride insisted that she be presented by her father while processing to "Send in the Clowns." I seemed to be the only one who saw the irony in this, and gladly agreed to play it. The couple stiffed me on the wedding fee. I found out later that the marriage ended in acrimonious divorce. My karma ran over their dogma...        
(back) Subject: RE: 75th Anniversary Broadcast From: "Milo R. Shepherd" <mrstwin2@rubberandsteel.com> Date: Sun, 29 Aug 2004 11:01:58 -0400   MessageI will watch the LDS website to see if a link is posted on the internet. It was put on Hallmark Channel this morning and was absolutely wonderful. I didn't know it was going to be broadcast this morning.   The past conductor was Jerold Ottley, who led the Choir for many years = until his retirement in 1995.   What I really liked was the old pictures of the Austin organ that they showed. This was the third organ console for the Tabernacle. The first = one was brought from Australia and the second was an enlargement of that = organ.   Milo -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of = Sam Vause Sent: Sunday, August 29, 2004 10:54 AM To: 'PipeChat' Subject: RE: 75th Anniversary Broadcast     I would have been nice to see an advance notice so one could have = planned to listen. Will this be rebroadcast on the Internet soon? --sam -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf = Of AEolianSkinner@aol.com Sent: Sunday, August 29, 2004 6:40 AM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: 75th Anniversary Broadcast       Congratulations to the Mormon Tabernacle Choir for 75 years of broadcasting Music and the Spoken Word. It was a marvelous concert. Richard Elliot played "Praise to the Lord with Cymbals and Drums". They broadcasted the broadcast in the Conference Center so they used their new = 5 Manual Schoenstein. It was a marvelous concert. Their final piece was Beethoven's "Halleluja". That was an interesting piece. They got a past conductor to conduct instead of Craig Jessop. Overall, it was splendid concert.   Best Regards, Gregory Hinson  
(back) Subject: Re: 75th Anniversary Broadcast From: <AEolianSkinner@aol.com> Date: Sun, 29 Aug 2004 11:10:09 EDT   I have pictures of the two consoles that Austin had in the Tabernacle. = If you would like to see them, I will surely post them. Austin also = installed the wings on the case during the first renovation and a new console. = During the second, it got a new tonal colors and another new console. I don't = think the broadcast will be showed again. I saw it on the Hallmark channel = this morning. I will look to see if it is going to be showed again.   Best Regards, Gregory Hinson    
(back) Subject: Re: Keeping bagpipes on the porch From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 29 Aug 2004 11:24:22 -0400       Glenda wrote: (snip)   > It must be my cutesy-nice that they are complaining about. I will cease > and desist posting.   Don't you dare! Don't make me have to come down there. Don't make me file = an injunction for non performance. Check your contract. Need I say more? Sternly Submitted Mike    
(back) Subject: Re: 75th Anniversary Broadcast From: "Eric McKirdy" <emckirdy@gladstone.uoregon.edu> Date: Sun, 29 Aug 2004 08:40:15 -0700   Also watch BYU TV=B9s web site for broadcast information. They often re-run Tabernacle Choir concerts, events and programs. BYU TV is standard programming for all customers of Dish Network or DirecTV, and many local cable companies also offer it their channel listings.   The web site is byutv.org.   Eric         On 8/29/04 8:10 AM, AEolianSkinner@aol.com said something about:   > I have pictures of the two consoles that Austin had in the Tabernacle. I= f you > would like to see them, I will surely post them. Austin also installed t= he > wings on the case during the first renovation and a new console. During = the > second, it got a new tonal colors and another new console. I don't think= the > broadcast will be showed again. I saw it on the Hallmark channel this > morning. I will look to see if it is going to be showed again. > =20 > Best Regards, > Gregory Hinson >=20      
(back) Subject: Motab Anniversary From: <DudelK@aol.com> Date: Sun, 29 Aug 2004 12:16:28 EDT   There is a lavishly illustrated commemorative book called "America's = Choir" available at Amazon. I must be getting sold since I've been listening to = them for more than 50 of those 75 years and even got to spend a little time at = the console on my first visit several years ago, as well as being at the gala concert that closed the AGO regional in SLC last year in the new hall with = about 16,000 other Motab fans. Dudelsvater  
(back) Subject: Re: What's with the bagpipes From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Sun, 29 Aug 2004 14:57:36 EDT   In a message dated 8/28/2004 10:26:38 PM Eastern Standard Time, runyonr@muohio.edu writes:   > Sorry I didn't met you when you were in Cincinnati. What drew you to = St. > Louis?   Ted Drewes, the Cardinals, colleges, the "Hill", the museums, = Anheuser-Busch, Barnes-Jewish Hospital, Florissant, The Central West End, St. Peters, Riverbend, Christ Church Cathedral, The "new" St. Louis Cathedral, the = Fox, The Muny, and of course.........     Bagpipes.     dale in Florida  
(back) Subject: Holland and North Germany From: "Stephen Roberts" <sroberts01@snet.net> Date: Sun, 29 Aug 2004 13:00:34 -0700 (PDT)   Dear List, This is my first ever posting to this list, though I have been active on = other electronic mailing lists. Colin Mitchell's posting concerning = organs in Holland has prompted me to tell you about an upcoming tour of = Holland and North Germany that my students and I will be making in = January. Western Connecticut State University, where I teach organ, has a = month long January break between the semesters. I took my class to Paris = in 2003 when I played a recital at St-Sulpice. My students learned so = very much from that trip, so I got the idea to take my class to Europe = every year to play historic organs and have master classes with some of = the Continent's most outstanding musicians. As a prelude -- or perhaps I should say "Praeludium" :) -- to our tour, = the eminent musicologist, Kerala Snyder, has invited my class to her home = in New Haven for a class on Buxtehude's music, and a discussion of the = various editions of that composer's organ works. Prof. Snyder is the = author of <Dieterich Buxtehude: Organist in Luebeck> the standard book on = Buxtehude and his music in English, and also wrote the entry on Buxtehude = for the New Grove's Dictionary. I've known Kerry since my grad school = days at Yale 30 years ago. She's a gracious lady, who has an encyclopedic = knowledge of this subject. This will be a great introduction to the = organs of that part of Europe. We're leaving from New York on Monday, January 10. The day we arrive, = Tuesday, January 11, we're taking a city tour that includes a visit to the = Rijksmuseum to get all of us oriented to the city and culture. Pieter Van = Dijk, the organ professor at the Amsterdam Conservatory, has invited my = class to sit in on his conservatory organ class on Wednesday, January 12; = the class will be held on one of the historic organs in that city. The = next day we're going to play the fabulous organ at St. Bavo in Haarlem, = and that evening we're traveling to Alkmaar, where Prof. Van Dijk has = arranged to give classes for us on the 1511 Jan Van Covelens (Johann von = Koblenz) organ in late Gothic style. Prof. Van Dijk is a recognized = authority on the music of Sweelinck; my students will be playing various = works of that composer for his comments. We're returning to Alkmaar the = next evening for classes on the music of Buxtehude on the 17th. century = Van Hagerbeer/Schnitger organ. On Saturday we're going to Leiden to play the newly restored Van Hagerbeer. On Sunday we'll = attend church at Oude Kerk, the church where Sweelinck was organist, to = hear traditional Dutch psalm singing and accompaniment by the organ in = that style. After church we'll get a go on the 18th. century Vater organ, = before boarding the train to Hamburg. In Hamburg Rudi Kelber, the organist at the Jakobikirche, has kindly = consented to show us the famous four manual Arp Schnitger organ. I'm = trying to arrange a visit to another organ in the area before we head back = to Amsterdam for our flight home on Tuesday. It does indeed cost money to visit organs in Holland. Most are in = churches that are closed, and are now museums. It costs a lot of money to = restore these instruments and provide for their maintenance. The fees = that we're being charged on our trip are substantial, but not exorbitant = in my opinion. The fees are generally paid to the local government, since = in most cases the organs are properties of the town, not the church in = which they are located. I suspect that more European churches with = historic organs will begin to charge fees to visit them. Personally I = think that this is only fair, since in many cases the congregations are = small and struggling. The organists also deserve to be paid for their = time as well. Even if no fee is requested, I always offer a small amount = for the upkeep of the organ. It is almost always accepted, and the = organists of these churches seem to appreciate this courtesy. I am really excited about this trip. Even though it is by no means an = exhaustive survey of the organs of this area, it is a good introduction to = them for my students. I'm absolutely convinced that this is by far the = best way to teach students about the music, the organs, and the cultures = that produced them. One visit and a bit of hands on experience is = certainly worth far more than any words from me, or even reading from = books on these subjects. We're lucky that our university is located only = a short distance from the New York airports, so it makes getting to Europe = easy and relatively inexpensive, especially at that time of year. Tuition = costs are low at my little state university, so the students are able to = save their pennies to afford to go. I know that the churches will be = cold, but that might be a useful experience in itself--to see what the = composers had to content with in the winter. I'll tell you all about it = when we come back! Stephen Roberts Western Connecticut State University, Danbury, CT, USA  
(back) Subject: Organs in Holland and North Germany; a postscript From: "Stephen Roberts" <sroberts01@snet.net> Date: Sun, 29 Aug 2004 13:21:56 -0700 (PDT)   Dear List, In my previous posting I forgot to mention an important point. My organ = class has only four students. When we went to Paris, my students got a = lot of time on the instruments we visited, including a very long evening = visit at St-Sulpice--something that is very unusual. If there were a big = group, as there usually is on the organ tours that are open to the general = public, my students would get very little time on the organs. In my = experience on organ crawls there is often a "bench hog" who plops himself = or herself down on every organ and tries to monopolize the time as well. = Limiting these trips to my organ class helps to eliminate this problem. = I've had several people ask if they could along, but I've respectfully = declined for that reason. It's a lot of work to organize these trips, but it is well worth it. I = already have 2006 planned as well: we're going to Austria to play historic = Austrian and Italian organs. My old friends and Vienna classmates, Peter = Planyavsky, Martin Haselboeck, and Gustav Auzinger, are giving classes on = Brahms, Liszt, and early Italian music respectively. We don't have any = decent organs at WCSU, but I'm trying to make up for it by these tours. Stephen Roberts Western CT State University, Danbury CT USA  
(back) Subject: RE: Belated announcement of recital From: "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 29 Aug 2004 16:05:17 -0500   OK, what's an "Honorary Organ"?   Michael - getting more and more confused   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of T.Desiree' Hines Sent: Saturday, August 28, 2004 8:17 AM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Belated announcement of recital     T. Desiree' Hines in recital Hartford Mem Baptist Church Detroit, MI 18700 James Couzens Hwy The W.James Abbington Honorary Organ Petty Madden Company IV/96 1988 Sunday Aug 29 2004 3 PM         From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Belated announcement of recital From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Sun, 29 Aug 2004 17:17:51 -0400   on 8/29/04 5:05 PM, Michael David at michaelandmaggy@earthlink.net wrote:   OK, what's an "Honorary Organ"? =20 Michael - getting more and more confused =20 - I suppose it's like an honorary doctorate. From _Webster's Third New International Dictionary_: "conferred in recognition of achievement or service without the usual prerequisites, duties or obligations." While I a= m sure the organ Desir=E9e played this afternoon was a real, honest-to-God pipe organ, and is "honorary" only in the sense of having been purchased and/or dedicated in someone's honor, the expression "honorary organ" strikes me as the perfect successor to the outworn term "toaster" for a pipe-challenged instrument. Maybe it'll catch on.   Give us a report on your recital, Desir=E9e, when you have a chance. I gathe= r from something you wrote that you played Alain's "Litanies." I bet it was thrilling!     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: Groningen Holland......Lager than life From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 29 Aug 2004 14:45:51 -0700 (PDT)   HELLO,   I'm glad that Shelley found my post about Groningen interesting.   To-day, being a Sunday, and very much a Dutch rest-day, I had not planned on hearing any organs......what a surprise I was to get!   With 14 year-old Shaun in tow, I have had to curtail the endless round of organ visits and recitals somewhat, and consider his need for thrills, speed and anything which will throw him upside down. Groningen proved ideal, for whilst I fell head-over-heels for the Schnitger in the Martinikerk, (and also the lovely 18th century koororgel by Le Picard) Shaun was dangling upside down on some fiendish fairground ride or other in the Staadhuisplaas, set up for some local festival or other. He drove me around the dodgem-cars, and insisted we went on the ghost-train......I felt quite ill!   So today, I headed for the coast......sand, nice beaches etc etc.   Then came the rain....and still more rain.....so we feld inland to Madurodam and the celebrated model town.....an extraordinary example of miniaturisation, with the most detailed models of palaces, churches and even whole docks!   Next, we moved on to Leiden.   How could I ever have known that I had stumbled across the Leiden music-week, and in the very first church I visited, not only was the organ being played, I was invited to play it also!   OK, it wasn't a Schnitger, but it was built in 1642 by Hagabeer!!!!   Off then to another church, where would you believe, the organ was playing?   Another organ played.....this time a little younger, dating from 1748, and capable of a big sound.   Again, more about these organs when I read up and research the organs I have heard/played on this year's travels, and try to fit them into context.   For anyone who wishes to contemplate one of the many organ tours in Holland, I can certainly put them on track with suitable contacts....not that I've ever been on one.   Tomorrow is Mondaag.....zilch organ konzerts.....so it will be a chance to try and beat Shaun in a go-kart here in Rotterdam. The last time, he played stock-cars with me, and I spent more time on the grass than on the asphalt!!   It's raining again, and windy, just like the UK has been all summer. Holland feels just like home this year!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Shelley Culver <culverse@westminster.edu> wrote:   > I loved this post!! > > I went to Groningen in June 2003, and was absolutely > amazed by the > Schnitger organ there! Colin is right -- it's > beautiful.     _______________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Win 1 of 4,000 free domain names from Yahoo! Enter now. http://promotions.yahoo.com/goldrush  
(back) Subject: Re: Holland and North Germany From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 29 Aug 2004 15:02:17 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Stephen Robert's efforts will be greatly appreciated by his students.....what a wonderfully innovative way of teaching the instrument. One historic organ is worth a thousand words!   For his Dutch schedule, I think I have played every organ he mentions....lo and behold....the Leiden instrument this very day!   I know what this exposure has meant to me over the years, and I know that his students will be similarly inspired by what they hear, even if, like me, they take the eclectic route in organ playing.   Today was an interesting one, for I saw an organist playing with early finger technique for the first time.....hands which never seemed to move except sideways, and fingers which were held claw-like with very little vertical motion. The organist was a pupil with Klaas Bolt and Ton Koopman....fascinating technique, but I shan't be taking it up myself!!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       --- Stephen Roberts <sroberts01@snet.net> wrote:   > Dear List, > > This is my first ever posting to this list, though I > have been active on other electronic mailing lists. > Colin Mitchell's posting concerning organs in > Holland has prompted me to tell you about an > upcoming tour of Holland and North Germany that my > students and I will be making in January.   > The next day we're > going to play the fabulous organ at St. Bavo in > Haarlem,..Alkmaar...Oude Kerk, (Amsterdam)     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - You care about security. So do we. http://promotions.yahoo.com/new_mail  
(back) Subject: a new setting of "Gentle Mary Laid Her Child" From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sun, 29 Aug 2004 15:50:29 -0700   A big "thank-you" to Dan Brittain for finding the lovely modal tune in "The Missouri Harmony."   I've sent this out to my download list; if anybody else wants it, please e-mail me privately. It's just a one-page hymn-tune setting ... nothing fancy. It's a freebie (grin).   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: What's with the bagpipes From: "Benjamin A Kolodziej" <bkolodzi@smu.edu> Date: Sun, 29 Aug 2004 19:19:53 -0500   I play about 175 weddings a year at a university chapel (located in a city called Highland Park--even the high school has it's own bagpipe corps.) I have had my encounters with musicians, most notably bagpipers. I agree that they are a loud, raucous instrument best saved for outdoors, but I personally enjoy their sound and usually enjoy working with them, even indoors. Fortunately, I contract requested musicians myself, so I have the luxury of only working with people I know to be good musicians. It is = also fortunate that the sanctuary has great acoustics.   I have done my share of bagpipe/organ duets. One of my best pipers even compiled a (self-published) book of bagpipe/organ duets, a couple of which = I have done with him (the first time he played with me, he asked me to "pump = a little harder," as he thought the organ was flat to the bagpipes. . . = isn't that what I do with those big pedals down there???) The bagpipe uses a different sort of tuning, the particulars of which I cannot address, so my piper friend wisely set all the music in his book in Eb or Bb. And even then the arrangements don't stray much from the ubiqitous Eb and Bb = chords! (And when they do, I find it best to figure out how to get back to Bb and = Eb as soon as possible!)   I have even found a way for him to be subtle. We have two organs, the big chancel organ (III/80 Aeolian Skinner/Schudi) and smaller gallery organ (II/8 Sipe.) I think we were requested to do Amazing Grace for a funeral (maybe it was a wedding--they all blur together after a while.) I put him up in the gallery *behind* the gallery organ--which is also under the en chamades to the main organ--while I played the gallery organ. In addition to muffling the sound on several sides, he was about as distant from the congregation as could be! I thought it worked pretty well. Kind of like having a human rank of pipes under expression. . .   Benjamin Kolodziej