PipeChat Digest #4949 - Wednesday, December 1, 2004
 
The Organist's Ball.
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
Being around suitable pipe organs WAS advert of interest
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
RE: nomenclature(was11 yr old "child prodigy")
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
RE: (nomenclature)
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: (nomenclature)
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: Rain & ice for speedsters. (was:Grains of Rice for Speakers)
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: nomenclature(was11 yr old "child prodigy")
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: (nomenclature)
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: (nomenclature)
  by <Georgewbayley@aol.com>
Gone with the wind
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: organs on the coast
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: 11 yr old "child prodigy" composer Jay Greenberg  [marginally	on-topi
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: UGH, let's try that AGAIN
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Re: Grains of Rice for Speakers
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Re: (nomenclature)
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Re: The Organist's Ball.
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: organs on the coast
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: UGH, let's try that AGAIN
  by "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net>
RE: Grains of Rice for Speakers
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: The Organist's Ball.
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
The flaws in the written and recorded history of the organ.
  by "noel jones" <gedeckt@usit.net>
Re: UGH, let's try that AGAIN
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
RE: UGH, let's try that AGAIN
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: The flaws in the written and recorded history of the organ.
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: organs on the coast
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: The Organist's Ball. From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Wed, 1 Dec 2004 21:59:04 -0000   OK Folks - that's the cue for your entries for the attendants at the "Organist's Ball"   I'll start the ball rolling:   My Lords, Ladies and Gentlemen, will you please welcome:-   Our organist visitors from Wales: Mr and Mrs. Apason, and their son Dai Apason....   All the way from Yorkshire - Mr. and Mrs. Flute and our Monica Flute...   Mr. & Mrs. Altera and their daughter Sesqui Altera...   Mr. & Mrs. Tibia and their unattractive daughter Plena!   Well you get the idea - with acknowledgements to "I'm sorry I haven't a Clue" a fine English institution of the radio waves.   Will Light Coventry UK   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Colin Mitchell Sent: 01 December 2004 21:23 To: PipeChat Subject: RE: 11 yr old "child prodigy" composer Jay Greenberg [marginallyon-topic, x...   Hello,   I think they dropped using this after the famous incident at a royal function, when the MC announced the next guests:-   "Your Royal Highnesses, My Lords,Ladies and Gentlemen....Mr and Mrs Bates and their son Master ....."   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> wrote:   > * Master" is a "Mister" diminutive for > gentlemen under the age of > majority and has nothing to do with the mastery of > anything in > particular). ;)       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - Helps protect you from nasty viruses. http://promotions.yahoo.com/new_mail   ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>    
(back) Subject: Being around suitable pipe organs WAS advert of interest From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 1 Dec 2004 14:01:47 -0800 (PST)   M and O organs are nice. BUT after recently gaining access to two suitable organs, one 23 ranks (at = work), and the other over 100 ranks (where I have lessons), pipes are = unbeatable. Digitals are not bad if you put pipe with them. I think my = previous situation was just one where anything would have sounded better. Go custom if you want digital of any kind, but look at pipes first. Desiree'   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com
(back) Subject: RE: nomenclature(was11 yr old "child prodigy") From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Wed, 1 Dec 2004 17:07:31 -0500   On Wed, 1 Dec 2004 14:09:24 -0600, Daniel Hancock wrote > >We'd better go back to using "thee", "thou", and "ye" in everyday > speech > >too, I suppose! English, like any language, is dynamic, and it changes > in > >different directions in different English speaking countries, again > like >any other language. We do not have to feel obligated to use > obsolete >language or language that is used in another country just > because that's >the way it "used to be"!! I'll stick with what IS > instead of what WAS >thanks! > >Andy > > Ordinarily, I would agree with you. However, I'm not sure that you can > qualify what (if anything) might be appropriate to distinguish "Master" > from "Mister", or "Mistress" from "Missus" (Mrs). Sure, these are what > WAS, and as far as I can tell, they are still what IS, regardless of > how much use they receive! > > Of course, the correct use of nomenclature ought to be of the utmost > interest to organists and organ-builders, but I daresay it isn't > always, judging from the mish-mash way of naming stops on organ = consoles. > Eclecticism, perhaps? > > Daniel Hancock > Springfield, Missouri   You've got some good points there, although I think it is appropriate to = put a much different priority on precision and correctness on things like stop =   engravings than what comes out of my mouth in everyday speech.   Incidentally, as far as stop nomenclature goes, except in cases where an organ is clearly a copy of a particular historic school, I'm a fan of = names like Oboe, Trumpet, Stopped Flute, Open Diapason, Chimney Flute, Mixture, Octave, etc, etc. Especially on smaller organs where there is but one = fully stopped flute, there is no need to call it anything but stopped flute, or = if you must, "stopped diapason". This would take away a lot of confusion = right there! On larger organs with multiple divisions, you do have the need to have different colors and the names need to be more descriptive of course.   Andy     A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: RE: (nomenclature) From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 2 Dec 2004 11:22:09 +1300     Seriously, could it be said that "Violin Diapason" and "Geigen Diapason" are one and the same, being that Geigen means Violin? Generally, however, you don't find both names on the instruments of the same type for from the same period...   To me, they are not the same sound at all. To me, a Violin Diapason is a = bit stringy and usually a bit insipid. As I hear it in my head, it is a different sound from the wonderful T.C.Lewis ranks called "Geigen Principal". The Lewis sounds are really great, but you can keep most of = the ViDiaps.   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: (nomenclature) From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 1 Dec 2004 14:21:54 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   That's got the same number of letters as "Double Open Diapason" but one less digit!   Coming to think of it, I don't know if I've ever seen the whole thing written out on a stop-head; the Double usually abbreviated to "Dbl."   There was a "Double Double Open Diapason 32ft" on the organ of Lichfield Cathedral...Holdich 1860.   Ever seen the Latin stop-list that William Hill used?   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- TheShieling <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> wrote:   > > On an organ in Cambridgeshire in England, I found on > a recent trip to the > UK, a knob labelled 8ft Open Violin Diapason. The > 19thC lettering was > cluttered, to say the least.       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - Helps protect you from nasty viruses. http://promotions.yahoo.com/new_mail  
(back) Subject: RE: Rain & ice for speedsters. (was:Grains of Rice for Speakers) From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 2 Dec 2004 11:28:26 +1300   >Don't want to be pedantic....BUT....   Oh, Colin, you enjoy pedantry every bit as much as I do. It's one of the joys of life, pointing out the mistakes of others, especially on obscure points or ones that don't matter a hoot to anyone...... :-)   Ross    
(back) Subject: RE: nomenclature(was11 yr old "child prodigy") From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 2 Dec 2004 11:42:40 +1300   [snip] > Especially on smaller organs where there is but one fully stopped flute, there is no need to call it anything but stopped flute, or = if   you must, "stopped diapason".   I'm deliberately having a few stopknobs re-engraved on my home organ = (where humour and bad taste can abound without fear of recrimination), as I'm = using all old Gothic-script knobs from 1860-1910 approx. So, I now have a knob which proudly says "Whistle 1ft". Another stop, made up from five ranks of = a dozen pipes or so each, the knob is labelled "Bitzerflote", though with an umlaut on the 'o'. (My computer ignorance I can't do an o-umlaut on an email). This rank is actually a beautiful one: I was given a box of old pipes and found to my great surprise that they made a continuous rank = where the there are no problems with sudden changes of tone. The bass is stopped wood ,then there are stopped plain metals, followed by open wood = Claribels, followed by harmonic spotted metals, and the top pipes are open plain metals. What else could the stop possibly be called? :-)   Ross    
(back) Subject: RE: (nomenclature) From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 2 Dec 2004 11:47:18 +1300   >Ever seen the Latin stop-list that William Hill used?   Do you mean the one with Pileata Gravis, etc.?   Oh yes, great fun. If you have it handy (my copy is buried somewhere in my barn) perhaps you could post it.   If I ever get round to it when my home organ is far more complete, there = are other labels I'd like to introduce, though probably won't:   On a wood flute, open from MidC up, "Honkflote 8ft". On a vicious Gamba, "Scratch 8ft". On a glorious SubBass from 1879, "For everything".   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: (nomenclature) From: <Georgewbayley@aol.com> Date: Wed, 1 Dec 2004 18:01:15 EST   On the new Choir/Solo divison to be installed next month in my church, = there will be a Chivas Regal 4/5. Draw your own conclusions.   George  
(back) Subject: Gone with the wind From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 1 Dec 2004 15:16:34 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   I came across a delightful tale yesterday, concerning Max Reger.   Apparently, Reger suffered terrible and often violent emissions of green house methane gas.   Sat at an organ console about to start a recital, Reger felt distinctly uncomfortable, and knew that an eruption was imminent. What could he do?   With masterful cunning, Reger drew out most of the organ stops for the opening piece, then dropping his hands onto the keys, let forth with an absolute rip-snorter.   Gales of laughter swept down the church.   HE HAD FORGOTTEN TO SWITCH THE BLOWER ON!!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Read only the mail you want - Yahoo! Mail SpamGuard. http://promotions.yahoo.com/new_mail  
(back) Subject: Re: organs on the coast From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Wed, 1 Dec 2004 17:24:42 -0600   It is usual to use gold or gold-plated contacts in coastal areas, so that the contacts don't corrode.   John Speller      
(back) Subject: Re: 11 yr old "child prodigy" composer Jay Greenberg [marginally on-topic, x... From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 01 Dec 2004 18:42:36 -0500   On 12/1/04 4:22 PM, "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:   > I think they dropped using this after the famous incident at a royal = function, > when the MC announced the next guests:- > > "Your Royal Highnesses, My Lords, Ladies and Gentlemen....Mr and Mrs = Bates and > their son Master ....."   Non-apocryphal: The last time I visited Crete (well, all right: the only time I've been to Greece), my traveling companion was a young man from London. His surname was "Batey." Regaled us with stories of how HE was addressed in the British classrooms.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: UGH, let's try that AGAIN From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Thu, 2 Dec 2004 07:47:34 +0800   Advert is widely used in Australia as a diminutive of advertisement. It is =   most certainly a noun. Bob Elms. ----- Original Message ----- From: "Adrianne Schutt" <maybe@pipcom.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, December 02, 2004 12:29 AM Subject: Re: UGH, let's try that AGAIN     > At 07:23 PM 30/11/2004 -0500, TubaMagna@aol.com swatted Nathan with: >>Okay, here we go: >>Yes, "advert" is a legitimate word. >>No, it is not a noun. > > Yes, it most certainly is a noun. Since daily usage by millions =   > doesn't seem validation enough, I ran a few searches. > >  
(back) Subject: Re: Grains of Rice for Speakers From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Thu, 2 Dec 2004 07:46:18 +0800   I saw an electronic organ with a speaker system in vented enclosures = which was more than 50 years old. Speakers were still working but the organ amplifier was not too well. I can't see why speakers should not last indefinitely as long as they were well made and of suitable material. I = have amateur radio gear here which must be close to 35 years iold. Speakers are =   still fine. Haven't we had this discussion before? Bob Elms ----- Original Message ----- From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, December 01, 2004 10:47 PM Subject: Re: Grains of Rice for Speakers     > At 03:26 AM 2004-12-01 +0000, you wrote: >>Hi Colin and all, >> I think a thirty year life for speakers is wildly optimistic in = most >> climates.    
(back) Subject: Re: (nomenclature) From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Thu, 2 Dec 2004 07:51:03 +0800   The Australian builder JE Dodd used a Violin Diapason 8 on the swell and = an Open Diapason 8 on the Great on his organs of the early 20th C.. I have = also seen organs by 19th C. English builders here who followed the same practice - Norman and Beard for example. Dodd also made a practice of having the first flute on the Great a = Clarabel and the first flute on the Swell a Hohl Flute 8. Bob Elms.   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, December 02, 2004 5:58 AM Subject: RE: (nomenclature)     As opposed to "Stopped Violin Diapason, I suppose!   Seriously, could it be said that "Violin Diapason" and "Geigen Diapason" are one and the same, being that Geigen means Violin? Generally, however, you don't find both names on the instruments of the same type for from the same period...   Daniel Hancock Springfield, Missouri       >This is always fun: gossipping about strange stop labels we've seen.   >On an organ in Cambridgeshire in England, I found on a recent trip to the >UK, a knob labelled 8ft Open Violin Diapason. The 19thC lettering was >cluttered, to say the least.   >Ross   ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>    
(back) Subject: Re: The Organist's Ball. From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 01 Dec 2004 19:00:26 -0500   On 12/1/04 4:59 PM, "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> wrote:   > your entries for the attendants at the "Organist's Ball"   Was Prince Ipple there?   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: organs on the coast From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Thu, 2 Dec 2004 08:02:42 +0800   Where I live the city is built between two hills with a large harbour to = the west (Princess Royal Harbour), the Southern Ocean to the south and east, = and Oyster Harbour to the north. We are literally almost surrounded by salt water. The pipe organs in the city (six) vary from three with mechanical action dating from 1890 to 1963 and two with electric and = electro-pneumatic built in 1966 and 1970 respectively. All the organs are tuned twice a year =   with reeds about four times a year and none give any trouble at all. One (1966) with EP and DE action had the old electromechanical stop switches replaced by a solid state system about 12 years ago. It continues to function trouble free. We do, however, have the advantage of a marvellous climate with most days having a maximum temperature through all seasons of between 16C and 25C = with an occasional excursion into lower winter and higher summer temperatures. The churches maintain a fairly even temperature all year round and there = is no air conditioning needed and minimal heating. My church has halogen = infra red heating which heats the human bodies without raising the air = temperature significantly. Ideal conditions for pipe organs! Bob Elms. ----- Original Message ----- From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, December 02, 2004 3:22 AM Subject: RE: organs on the coast     > >Tell me, those of you "who like to be be-side the sea-side" and live in =   > >UK > coastal towns, are you experiencing similar problems with your organs to > those outlined above ? > > I live in New Zealand, 13000 miles (approx.) from the UK, but I must say > I've never heard that being near the sea makes any problems to an organ. = I > have an electric-action-on-slider-chest pipe organ that for the first 25 > years of its life was 200 yards from the beach and is now less than half = a > mile away. Not the slightest problem. >    
(back) Subject: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Wed, 1 Dec 2004 19:20:30 EST   Time to ditch the OED -- obviously an unreliable source. Now that we have strayed from the substantive topics that were too = difficult to discuss, I'll do some other work. Talk amongst yourselves...  
(back) Subject: Re: UGH, let's try that AGAIN From: "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net> Date: Wed, 01 Dec 2004 19:21:49 -0500   I don't know what this has to do with pipe chat, but "advert" can certainly be a verb:   Etymology: Middle English "adverten," from Middle French & Latin; Middle French "advertir," from Latin "advertere," from "ad- + vertere" to turn 1 : to turn the mind or attention -- used with to <adverted to the = speaker> 2 : to call attention in the course of speaking or writing : make reference -- used with to <adverted to foreign-language sources>   Seems to me most of the time Sebastian is right on.     Steve Best in Utica, NY  
(back) Subject: RE: Grains of Rice for Speakers From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 2 Dec 2004 13:33:09 +1300   >I can't see why speakers should not last indefinitely as long as they were well made and of suitable material. I = have   amateur radio gear here which must be close to 35 years old. Speakers are still fine. Haven't we had this discussion before?   Here beginneth a non-sequitur:   I have a big floor-model AWA radio from 1933 here at home. It has a 10" speaker that is as good as new. The whole beastie produces a magnificently warm tone, even if it is only for AM radio. Even the green magic-eye = tuning thingie is still perfect. So, it's now 71years old. It's had some $20 in repairs since I bought it for $6 in a junkshop in 1968.   Ross    
(back) Subject: RE: The Organist's Ball. From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 2 Dec 2004 13:35:48 +1300     > your entries for the attendants at the "Organist's Ball" Was Prince Ipple there?   No, that was his sister Natasha in drag - Miss N.Ipple.   Scurrilously, Ross    
(back) Subject: The flaws in the written and recorded history of the organ. From: "noel jones" <gedeckt@usit.net> Date: Wed, 01 Dec 2004 19:37:54 -0500     Those who published books that we easily put down as error-filled and full of false doctrine were people who were concerned about others understanding the organ, just as Albert Schweitzer and other organists who recorded so people could hear an organ in their parlor on a Victrola...and now these books and recordings are laughed at today by the arrogant, the over-educated, the snide and... Today many seem to think they can establish themselves, or their organ company, as a major force in the industry by means of a computer, a modem and a cheap email account. However, is it possible that their words, rather than their work, will become their mantle?   It is sad to think that someone who, twenty years ago, could grow as a builder by the reputation of their instruments, might today find their livelihood threatened by their exposure as people of words rather than craft.   We have seen the wizard, it's time to go back to Kansas.     -- noel jones, aago noeljones@frogmusic.com ----------------------------------- 1 877 249-5251 Athens, TN USA   www.frogmusic.com Rodgers Organ Users Group Frog Music Press - Organ and MIDI Music FMP Organ Music Search Service Rodgers Organ Design & Voicing Services      
(back) Subject: Re: UGH, let's try that AGAIN From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 01 Dec 2004 19:43:40 -0500   On 12/1/04 7:21 PM, "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net> wrote:   > Seems to me most of the time Sebastian is right on.   My opinion, too.   Alan  
(back) Subject: RE: UGH, let's try that AGAIN From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 2 Dec 2004 13:51:07 +1300   >Advert is widely used in Australia as a diminutive of advertisement. It = is most certainly a noun.   Same here in NZ. Stress the first syllable for the noun, the second for = the verb. So, easy to advert to an advert. Same principle applies to lots of other noun/verb same-spellings. So produce/produce, progress/progress and = so on. I must admit, though I think in some words we're fighting a losing battle on this. People nowadays have a habit of saying "prog-ress" (with = the "o" as in "hot") instead of "pro-gress" with the "o" as in "hope".   In the same ghastly way, we now commonly hear "contribute" with the stress on the first syllable instead of the second. If only people knew their Latin, and thus knew to stress the major root. Big sigh. Mind you, we must admit there are lots of exceptions.............................   It all seems to boil down to "Please do it my way. Your way is wrong, unprincipled, bad, low-class, uneducated, while all my pronunciation = choices are intelligent, sane, educated........"   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: The flaws in the written and recorded history of the organ. From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Wed, 1 Dec 2004 20:04:04 EST     In a desperate, knee-jerk compulsion to insult, gedeckt@usit.net (Noel = Jones) writes:   "Those who published books that we easily put down as error-filled and = full of false doctrine were people who were concerned about others = understanding the organ, just as Albert Schweitzer and other organists who recorded so = people could hear an organ in their parlor on a Victrola...and now these books = and recordings are laughed at today by   the arrogant, the over-educated, the snide and..."   Read and understand this: There is a gulf of disparity between disagreeing with a musical interpretation or a concept of organ tone and publishing false facts. It = is known that Stevens Irwin's book is full of incorrect information, much of which he = concocted. Nobody has even bothered to disagree with any opinions he may have had. To =   further your analogy, intelligent humans distinguish between Schweitzer's musical interpretation of a work and any wrong notes he may have played.   Get it?     You further spew: "Today many seem to think they can establish themselves, or their organ company, as a major force in the industry by means of a computer, a modem = and a cheap email account. However, is it possible that their words, rather than = their work, will become their mantle?"   Once again, you hurl yourself into the gutter to posting something = insulting and preposterous. Would any pipe organ builder on this list be in business = if they had no instruments to their credit, relying on chatlist posts to earn = a living? Well, ya know what, sweetie? Every organbuilder's instruments = speak for themselves -- as do yours.   However, I am pleased to know that you shall have a place in the history books, and the rest of us shall not.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City   ..    
(back) Subject: Re: organs on the coast From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Wed, 1 Dec 2004 20:26:35 EST   Hi John: Many builders use contacts the are completely anarobic sealed against any outside corrosive materials in the air. Allen has done this for years and I suppose most pipe organ companies too. Most modern relays don't send sufficient spark to keep contacts clean no matter whether the contacts are silver or gold. In the early 90's when new equipment with very low voltages were introduced sealed contacts became the norm. The old and new technologies just don't work very well together. Ron Severin