PipeChat Digest #4964 - Saturday, December 4, 2004
 
Re: What is Acoustic Sealant Paint?
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
composers' performances (was purity)
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Re: Lack of Comprehensive Choruses
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: screaming mixtures
  by "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr>
Chivas Regal 4/5'
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: What is Acoustic Sealant Paint?
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Humor with stops WAS Chivas Regal 4/5'
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Cornets and their placement
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: composers' performances (was purity)
  by "Richard Jordan" <mail@gesangbuch.org>
Re: What is Acoustic Sealant Paint?
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
Re: Chivas Regal 4/5'
  by <Georgewbayley@aol.com>
Re: Incorrectly named stops
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: Chivas Regal 4/5'
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
RE: Lack of Comprehensive Choruses
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Chivas Regal 4/5'
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: Chivas Regal 4/5'
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: composers' performances (was purity)
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Cornet compasses, compositions, locations
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Chivas Regal 4/5'
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
5 New Theatre Organ CDs at OHS
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
5 New Theatre Organ CDs at OHS
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
 

(back) Subject: Re: What is Acoustic Sealant Paint? From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sat, 04 Dec 2004 09:31:10 -0800   Epoxy-resin impregnated paint for plaster and wall-board ... 2 coats is good; 3 is better. It goes on in a two-part process.   You probably should have an acoustical consultant, though ...   http://www.smwinc.com/pub/contact/sf.html   I don't know if "Red" Wetherill has retired or not ... he's the BEST ... but they have offices nationwide, and can do most of it via phone, fax, blueprints, etc.   If you harden EVERYTHING, you could end up with slap echoes. "Red" recommended accordion side walls in the organ/choir loft for that reason. Depending on where the organ and choir are, you DON'T want a flat east wall facing a flat west wall ... they need to be broken up with something (hard) ... reredos, etc.   Porous stone usually requires matte finish silicon spray ... several coats. You might write to the music dept. at St. Thomas, NYC ... they recently got that room fixed, FINALLY.   http://www.saintthomaschurch.org/   If you're going to re-plaster anything, you should probably do it with Keene Cement. It's more expensive than epoxy-resin paint, but it was made for water-proof plaster applications like shower rooms and restrooms. It's REALLY hard, and can be painted.   Have fun ... we were so thrilled with the acoustics in our new church .... 150 seats ... THREE SECONDS reverb ... that the chairman of the building committee CRIED the first time he heard the organ and choir in the new space. Congregational singing IMMEDIATELY went into ORBIT; the 12-cylinder volunteer schola sounded like the MoTab downstairs (chuckle).   Cheers,   Bud   Ned Benson wrote:   > Steven Weyand Folkers wrote: > >> We had to prepare the north chamber (bare cinderblock walls) with >> insulation, wallboard, and acoustic sealant paint, as well as = lighting. > > > We are preparing for installation of a recycled Aeolian-Skinner > instrument in a 1969 A-frame worship space with "cottage cheese" > acoustic crap on the ceiling, one side wall of fired brick, one of 3/4" > hard plaster over 3/4" gypsum board lath, front wall of stone, rear wall =   > of plaster over gypsum and glass. Carpet slathered everywhere. > > The carpet is going, replaced by ceramic tile. The "cottage cheese" is > going (it's also 20% asbestos - removal is EXPENSIVE!!); the ceiling, > also hard plaster over gypsum board lath, will be skip-trowel finished. > The walls have been sealed and painted at least twice with ordinary > latex flat paint. > > Brick and plaster surfaces will be repainted. But with what? Hence my > question, what is "acoustic sealant paint"? > > Every paint contractor and paint store with whom I have talked knows > about paint to deaden a room, but none know what paint to use to make a > room most reverberant. I asked a national paint resource lab, who > suggested oil-based gloss enamel. We can't use gloss - it's a worship > space not an education hall. Is oil-based enamel, either flat or > egg-shell, what you mean by acoustic paint? The more specifics in your > responses, the better. > > Many thanks. >      
(back) Subject: composers' performances (was purity) From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Sat, 4 Dec 2004 11:37:52 -0600     I'd like to address Colin's remark, excerpted below. My thoughts are = random; I hope they show some understanding and empathy.   Speaking as a composer, I've had to suffer through some very bad performances of my music. At such times, I've wanted to do four things at once:   1. strangle the performer(s); 2. vomit; 3. knock the person off the bench and play it myself; 4. crawl under a pew or be capable suddenly of disappearing miraculously from the scene.   I'm continually amazed at how people can look at the notes in front of them--complete with registrations, tempo markings, dynamics, = phrasings--and how dismally off the mark their renderings can be. How can human beings = who call themselves musicians be so different? How can some people be so incapable of feeling?   It is my hope that, before I get too old, I can get the funds together to record a few dozen of my recent organ works to give an indication of what = I intended. Not the ONLY way a piece can/should be played, surely, but the = way I react to it at that instant. The main thing, I guess, is to show that woodenness and aloofness simply won't do. Cold note-pushing will not do. A lack of artistic understanding, commitment, and deep emotion won't do. Tomorrow I'll play my variations on Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland, = published c. 1989. Having not played it in several years, I now come to it afresh. I'll omit some variations that I no longer like or that don't work well on the instrument I'm playing. Registrations will not be strictly adhered to. Acoustics, instrument, one's mood and perception at the moment will all contribute to a unique offering.   Too often, I am shocked by the insensitivity of organists' performances. Some organists simply don't have a clue. Part of the problem is that they haven't mastered the instrument. If you're flummoxed by hand/foot coordination, manipulating swell boxes meaningfully, registering effectively, worrying about fingering, etc., etc., you can't begin to make sense of the music. The mechanics have to be mastered so that you can concentrate on making a totally musical statement. This is my ideal, and human frailty works against it every chance it gets. It is so easy to get bogged down with changing pistons or finding the proper expression pedal, and before you know it, you're not devoting proper attention to the score.   One person I heard a couple of months ago (at St. Raphael in Naperville, = IL) who seems to have everything together is Doug Cleveland. No matter how difficult the score, he was totally and effortlessly in control, and the results were wonderfully musical.   Another word about composers and their thoughts on their own music from my viewpoint. For some long stretches, I may write one or two organ works in = a week. After a year, I don't even remember writing some of them. After setting aside certain pieces for a couple of years, I may not remember = what I had in mind when I wrote them, and I have to start pretty much from scratch just as anyone else would. To show how silly this can get: Months ago I reviewed a contract before signing it and decided the publisher had included a piece (one of a dozen) I hadn't written. I e-mailed the editor who wrote back something like: "I have in my hand a 4-page piece in Finale that has that very title, and it's composed by Robert Lind. Is that you?" = I woke up at that point, found the piece in my files, and wrote a sheepish apology.   Bob Lind (who hopes he can play something as difficult as the toccata from Widor's 5th when he's 88)   ----- Original Message ----- From: Colin Mitchell <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, December 04, 2004 6:00 AM Subject: Re: purity     <snip>   > Like it or not, we are all arrangers/performers. > > Let the composers compose, and let the rest of us > worry about how it should sound. > > Regards, > > Colin MItchell UK    
(back) Subject: Re: Lack of Comprehensive Choruses From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 4 Dec 2004 10:07:44 -0800 (PST)       RMB10@aol.com wrote:   As to the Cornet and the Cromorne being on the same manual...Why on earth = do builders INSIST on doing that? Read the TAO and Diapason each month and you'll see it on 75% of the instruments. I remember learning that a Cornet = and Cromorne always were in dialogue when I was a kid learning some French = Classic pieces.   It all comes back to education...or lack thereof. (and willingness to = learn)   TDH writes: Why do builders do any of the above if the know the end result is not = helpful? Ideal placement of a Cornet would be on Swell/Recit and = Krummorn/Chromhorne/Crummorne on the Pos/Ch, no? Enlighten TDH   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com
(back) Subject: Re: screaming mixtures From: "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr> Date: Sat, 4 Dec 2004 20:14:06 +0200   Dear list, Both Colin and Monty are right on on this. Colin has picked some masterpieces, built by master craftsmen and Monty is telling us about an organ where obviously the same level of skill is not apparent. Just as = with composers, genius shines through, so it is with organ building. Like most walks of life there are the quite outstanding 3% - the average 94% and the =   rock bottom remainder. Most builders fall in the average category, though some are more average than others. It is quite easy to ruin something as delicate as high pitched organ pipe. John Foss http://www.organsandorganistsonline.com/ http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/   Colin Mitchell on Armley "Although a very loud Mixture, it blends perfectly with the bright voicing =   of the chorus." Monty Bennet on an anonymous builder "You would think that the voicer had ears to hear that the mixture didn't make a cohesive sound with the 8, 4, 2."      
(back) Subject: Chivas Regal 4/5' From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Sat, 4 Dec 2004 13:28:14 EST   Clever stop names can be amusing, but if I saw the pitch designation of = 4/5' on a stop, I would assume that it was a Tierce of some sort. However, the =   Regal would give me the indication that it's a reed stop. Mr. Bayley said = that the stop is actually going to control the Tremulant in his new Choir/Solo division. I would have no idea what it was until I tried it--then, if I = tried it by itself and heard it do nothing, I would assume it was a prepared for = stop.   I played one organ where the curator had one "prank" stop knob engraved = that he installed when guests came to play the organ. He put it on just to get =   their reaction, then he put the real knob face back on. It can be funny, = but if the stopknob doesn't give any indication of what the stop is, it can be confusing for others who might be playing the organ, other than the = incumbent musician.   Chivas Regal is funny but I don't get what the connection to the tremulant =   is--if that was put on a reed stop instead of Holz Regal or something, I = would see the humor more.   Please enlighten me...I'm not a drinker, so I know I'm missing something = here.   Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Re: What is Acoustic Sealant Paint? From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Sat, 4 Dec 2004 12:31:59 -0600     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, December 04, 2004 11:31 AM Subject: Re: What is Acoustic Sealant Paint?   > Have fun ... we were so thrilled with the acoustics in our new church > ... 150 seats ... THREE SECONDS reverb ... that the chairman of the > building committee CRIED the first time he heard the organ and choir in > the new space. Congregational singing IMMEDIATELY went into ORBIT; the > 12-cylinder volunteer schola sounded like the MoTab downstairs = (chuckle).   Our church, built in 1939, also has excellent acoustics, 4 seconds of reverberation in a building seating 200. It is designed basically like a shoebox, 75 feet long, 25 ft. wide and 35 ft. high, with a flat ceiling. The height makes a big difference. The walls are painted brick. = Slappiness is prevented by having the organ gallery and Aeolian-Skinner organ across the west wall, and a number of pillars at intervals along the side walls. The organ and our 12-member choir sounds wonderful in the space, although = I like to think they have a lot less vibrato than MoTab. One thing in particular I have noticed is that choirs learn to sing in much better tune and blend better when they can hear themselves in a lively acoustic, and they seem to take these skills with them even if they then move into a = room with poor acoustics.   John Speller, St. Mark's Episcopal Church, St. Louis.      
(back) Subject: Humor with stops WAS Chivas Regal 4/5' From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 4 Dec 2004 10:51:43 -0800 (PST)       RMB10@aol.com wrote:.   "I played one organ where the curator had one "prank" stop knob engraved = that he installed when guests came to play the organ." TDH writes: Bob, I don't like Whiskey. Now is Chivas Regal were a Coconut Rum, or = Moscato, I'd totally be up for it. LOL Monty mentioned a "prank" stop. This brings up a funny story from back = home in Jackson. Alta Woods is a neighorhood in Jackson that has a = Baptist, Methodist, and Pres. Church all within one mile of each other. A = former classmate was organist at the Baptist church (III/? Schantz). He = mentioned that once a rather conservative lady that was filling in at the = organ. She sat at the organ and did not know alot about stop nomenclature. = (Your average Lurleen Gurder, as Seb. Gluck would say) So, she saw the 8' = Fagot on the Great, and actually felt uncomfortable. So uncomfortable that = she asked for masking tape to cover the stopface. I kid you not! This = indeed happened! Of course, she did not know it was an actual stop name, = and concluded it to be the derrogatory term used to discribe...you know = the rest. But she did not like the stop because it was not "supposed to = be in church." Just a touch of Saturday humor. TDH     From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com
(back) Subject: Cornets and their placement From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sat, 04 Dec 2004 11:00:43 -0800       T.Desiree' Hines wrote:   > > > > TDH writes: > Why do builders do any of the above if the know the end result is not > helpful? > > Ideal placement of a Cornet would be on Swell/Recit and > Krummorn/Chromhorne/Crummorne on the Pos/Ch, no? > > Enlighten > TDH > > > __________________________________________________   Actually, the first cornet should be on the GREAT, to balance the (8' Bourdon - 4' Prestant) - 8' Cromorne of the unenclosed Positive.   It can be 2 2/3' III ranks, 2 2/3' III-V ranks (picking up the 4' in the second octave and the 8' in the third octave) or (preferably) 8' V ranks, but in ANY case it MUST be full-compass, for playing Basse de Tierce and Basse de Trompette movements, as well as for the Grand Jeu combination.   If properly voiced, it can also substitute for a missing 4' Clairon, if there isn't space/money for both.   The French Baroque Recit Cornet was mostly used for echo effects.   The Great Cornet compos=E9 and the Positive Cornet decompos=E9 [Bourdon 8, =   PRESTANT 4, not flute 4', Nasard 2 2/3, Quarte (WIDE-scale 2') and Tierce] should be able to dialogue in balance with one another.   French Cornets are NOT wimpy (grin). The fact that the Great Cornet should be able to sub for a CLAIRON indicates THAT (chuckle). Those French mounted cornets can STRIP PAINT.   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: composers' performances (was purity) From: "Richard Jordan" <mail@gesangbuch.org> Date: Sat, 04 Dec 2004 13:20:21 -0600   At 11:37 AM 12/4/04 -0600, you wrote: > Colin MItchell UK is thought to have written: > Like it or not, we are all arrangers/performers. > Let the composers compose, and let the rest of us > worry about how it should sound.   doesn't this question the purpose of composition and lead to anarchy? this really bothers me, as music is a language system with rules and = order, composers use this language system to communicate their ideas, and have a certain expectation, that they will be understood. I would hope that should someone wonder what I meant by what I wrote and they could not ask, they would listen to my recordings, which hopefully explain why I wrote as I did.           Regards, Richard Jordan   http://www.Lutheran-Hymnal.com http://www.OnJordansBanks.com  
(back) Subject: Re: What is Acoustic Sealant Paint? From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Sat, 4 Dec 2004 13:28:33 -0600 (Central Standard Time)   The following message was received on Pipechat: -------Original Message------- Steven Weyand Folkers wrote: >> We had to prepare the north chamber (bare >> cinderblock walls) with insulation, wallboard, and acoustic sealant = paint as well >> as lighting. > We are preparing for installation of a recycled Aeolian-Skinner > instrument in a 1969 A-frame worship space with "cottage cheese" > acoustic crap on the ceiling, one side wall of fired brick, one of 3/4" > hard plaster over 3/4" gypsum board lath, front wall of stone, rear > wall of plaster over gypsum and glass. Carpet slathered everywhere. > The carpet is going, replaced by ceramic tile. The "cottage cheese" > is going (it's also 20% asbestos - removal is EXPENSIVE!!); the > ceiling, also hard plaster over gypsum board lath, will be skip-trowel > finished. > The walls have been sealed and painted at least twice with ordinary > latex flat paint. I presume you mean "skim-troweled". Actually: "popcorn" ceilings aren't = all that big of a deal if the surface behind them is hard! It's the tongue-and-groove ceiling of wood with no finish on them that is worse in = a A-frame! > Brick and plaster surfaces will be repainted. But with what? Hence > my question, what is "acoustic sealant paint"? You can use a basic waterproofing sealer like Thompson's Water seal, but since that is somewhat glossy, you can also use a flat polyurethane = varnish, which will keep the finish dull and yet seal the pores to eliminate sound absorption. Many construction supply companies offer a sealer that is meant for = applying to brick to help preserve the finish. Check with them. Hope this helps! Faithfully, Richard Schneider  
(back) Subject: Re: Chivas Regal 4/5' From: <Georgewbayley@aol.com> Date: Sat, 4 Dec 2004 14:38:24 EST   The humour is that when one indulges too heavily in Chivas Regal or any = other spirit, for that matter, one gets the "shakes".   George  
(back) Subject: Re: Incorrectly named stops From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 4 Dec 2004 13:15:52 -0800 (PST)       RMB10@aol.com wrote:   The Flentrop at Duke Chapel has a Hobo stop.   AHA! I knew I had seen it on some Dutch influenced specs!   TDH     --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? The all-new My Yahoo! =96 What will yours do?
(back) Subject: Re: Chivas Regal 4/5' From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Sat, 4 Dec 2004 16:26:47 EST   I once heard about the presence of trick stops on baroque organs. The = knob said something like "do not pull"-which of course makes the visitor want = to pull it-it's human nature. Once they give in and drab the knob, a fox = tail flies out and whips them in the face. Apparently it was impossible to = reset this fox tail device on your own, so you were always forced to ask the = resident musician to help you put it back. Quite embarrasing! gfc       Gregory Ceurvorst 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS Evanston, IL 60201 847.332.2788 home/fax 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net  
(back) Subject: RE: Lack of Comprehensive Choruses From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Sun, 5 Dec 2004 11:10:00 +1300   >Ideal placement of a Cornet would be on Swell/Recit and Krummorn/Chromhorne/Crummorne on the Pos/Ch, no?=20 =A0 To me, no. I want the Cromorne on the Pos/Ch and the Cornet, mounted and unenclosed, on the Great where it can be used as in the Olde Englishe = music or with the reeds for other stuff.   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: Chivas Regal 4/5' From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 4 Dec 2004 14:22:09 -0800 (PST)   GREGORY FR***** CEURVORST! LMFAO ! Where is this organ? TDH   --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - You care about security. So do we.
(back) Subject: Re: Chivas Regal 4/5' From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 04 Dec 2004 17:33:40 -0500   On 12/4/04 4:26 PM, "Gfc234@aol.com" <Gfc234@aol.com> wrote:   > The knob said something like "do not pull"-which of course makes the visi= tor > want to pull it-it's human nature.   =B3No le tangere 4=B9=B2 as I recall. Not just =B3don=B9t pull,=B2 but don=B9t even TOUCH! (But wasn=B9t that the one labeled =B3Fuchsschwantz 4=B9=B2? Seems to me that =B3No le . . .=B2 left one with a handful of lumber.)   Alan  
(back) Subject: Re: composers' performances (was purity) From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 4 Dec 2004 14:43:46 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Allow me to explain my comments more fully.   The concept of "the composer being in control" is one which really stems from the 19th century.   Before that, there was much more latitude in performance practice; perhaps best exemplified by the various schools of Early Music.   Unfortunately, of all instruments, the organ is by far the most variable; belonging as it does to specific eras, specific styles, eclectic design, orchestral design, symphonic design, neo-baroque, German, French, Italian, Spanish etc etc.   Furthermore, even within specific categories, there is considerable variation.   Even worse, organs operate in unique acoustics, which dictate the pace to some extent.....slower in big acoustics, and quicker in dead acoustics.   So with the best will in the world, a composer for organ is only ever in partial control of the end result; assuming that he/she want a work to be bought, performed and heard.   Of course, it goes without saying that a performer should be aware of genres and styles, of specific registrations and tone colours, but everything depends upon the experience of the performer.   I have mentioned Jos van der Kooy's performances before, because they are very significant artistically. On what appears to be a completely "wrong" instrument at the Bavokerk, he succeeds brilliantly in performing works from the romantic repertoire, the modern repertoire, the classical period and, quite naturally, the baroque repertoire. In fact, it is absolutely astonishing how, with nothing short of miraculous registration, he gets superb dynamic control, and can even "simulate" the "effect" of Swell Boxes.......this from a "werkprinzip" instrument. Words do not suffice....it has to be heard to be appreciated.   If Robert Lind writes music, and then expects it to sound in a particular way, then he will be more disappointed than pleased most of the time. In fact, I could argue the point that anyone who composes for the organ, must allow for the variables mentioned above.   Of course, in the Mozart K608, we are in transcription for an entirely "wrong" instrument, and registration is very much "on the fly."   A fine organist can make music of the K608, of the Schumann works for "Pedal Pianoforte" and even perform works intended for full orchestra........that was my point!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   PS: Rules were made for the guidance of wise men, and for the obedience of fools.     --- Richard Jordan <mail@gesangbuch.org> wrote:   Colin Mitchell wrote:- > > Like it or not, we are all arrangers/performers. > > Let the composers compose, and let the rest of us > > worry about how it should sound. > Richard Jordan replied: > doesn't this question the purpose of composition and > lead to anarchy? > this really bothers me, as music is a language > system with rules and order, > composers use this language system to communicate > their ideas, > and have a certain expectation, that they will be > understood.       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - now with 250MB free storage. Learn more. http://info.mail.yahoo.com/mail_250  
(back) Subject: Re: Cornet compasses, compositions, locations From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sat, 4 Dec 2004 17:45:35 EST   By now, almost every conservatory library, and many a university library, = has a copy of at least one edition of Fenner Douglass' "The Language of the Classical French Organ." Chances are, you have a colleague who owns a = copy.   This is a fine reference volume, which has enjoyed multiple printings = since its publication by Yale in 1969.   Reading it should answer many questions and end rampant speculation.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City   ..  
(back) Subject: Re: Chivas Regal 4/5' From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 4 Dec 2004 15:22:54 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Whenever I sit at the sumptious console of old Harrison & Harrison organs, I always feel that they should have a blank stop, which when pulled, opens a polished wood cocktail cabinet such as Rolls-Royce motors had/have.   In fact, there is one cathedral organ in Europe, which has exactly this!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- RMB10@aol.com wrote:   > Please enlighten me...I'm not a drinker, so I know > I'm missing something here.       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - 250MB free storage. Do more. Manage less. http://info.mail.yahoo.com/mail_250  
(back) Subject: 5 New Theatre Organ CDs at OHS From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Sat, 4 Dec 2004 18:26:32 -0500   Five new theatre organ CDs are now available at the bottom of the opening page at http://www.ohscatalog.org   There is a new one from George Wright as made from tapes that were discovered in 1998, two new ones from Ron Rhode (one on the Moller theatre organ at the Rylander Theatre in Atlanta, and another on the Sanfilippo organ), a new one from Jonas Nordwall at the Berkeley Theatre (now up to = 35 ranks from 20 of a few years ago), and a fine sounding one from the Clydebank Town Hall near Glasgow, Scotland, played by Keith Beckingham.   There's also the "King of Kings" silent movie accompanied by the Skinner organ at Jefferson Avenue Presbyterian Church in Detroit.   Bill    
(back) Subject: 5 New Theatre Organ CDs at OHS From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Sat, 4 Dec 2004 18:26:32 -0500   Five new theatre organ CDs are now available at the bottom of the opening page at http://www.ohscatalog.org   There is a new one from George Wright as made from tapes that were discovered in 1998, two new ones from Ron Rhode (one on the Moller theatre organ at the Rylander Theatre in Atlanta, and another on the Sanfilippo organ), a new one from Jonas Nordwall at the Berkeley Theatre (now up to = 35 ranks from 20 of a few years ago), and a fine sounding one from the Clydebank Town Hall near Glasgow, Scotland, played by Keith Beckingham.   There's also the "King of Kings" silent movie accompanied by the Skinner organ at Jefferson Avenue Presbyterian Church in Detroit.   Bill