PipeChat Digest #4965 - Saturday, December 4, 2004
 
5 New Theatre Organ CDs at OHS
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
5 New Theatre Organ CDs at OHS
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
Re: composers' performances (was purity)
  by "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com>
Joke stops
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: composers' performances (was purity)
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Glossy Paint
  by "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com>
Cromorne & Mutations
  by "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com>
The stuff of nightmares!
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: composers' performances (was purity)
  by "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Glossy Paint
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: Cromorne & Mutations
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: Glossy Paint
  by "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net>
Re: What is Acoustic Sealant Paint?
  by <SWF12262@aol.com>
Re: Glossy Paint
  by "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net>
Re: Glossy Paint
  by "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net>
Re:  What is acoustic sealant paint?
  by "Kenneth Potter" <swell_shades@yahoo.com>
Re: Chivas Regal 4/5'
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com>
Re: Chivas Regal 4/5'
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com>
RE: pipe organs in chapels of churches
  by "Vincent S. Parks, III" <vparks@houston.rr.com>
RE: pipe organs in chapels of churches
  by "Vincent S. Parks, III" <vparks@houston.rr.com>
 

(back) Subject: 5 New Theatre Organ CDs at OHS From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Sat, 4 Dec 2004 18:26:32 -0500   Five new theatre organ CDs are now available at the bottom of the opening page at http://www.ohscatalog.org   There is a new one from George Wright as made from tapes that were discovered in 1998, two new ones from Ron Rhode (one on the Moller theatre organ at the Rylander Theatre in Atlanta, and another on the Sanfilippo organ), a new one from Jonas Nordwall at the Berkeley Theatre (now up to = 35 ranks from 20 of a few years ago), and a fine sounding one from the Clydebank Town Hall near Glasgow, Scotland, played by Keith Beckingham.   There's also the "King of Kings" silent movie accompanied by the Skinner organ at Jefferson Avenue Presbyterian Church in Detroit.   Bill    
(back) Subject: 5 New Theatre Organ CDs at OHS From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Sat, 4 Dec 2004 18:26:32 -0500   Five new theatre organ CDs are now available at the bottom of the opening page at http://www.ohscatalog.org   There is a new one from George Wright as made from tapes that were discovered in 1998, two new ones from Ron Rhode (one on the Moller theatre organ at the Rylander Theatre in Atlanta, and another on the Sanfilippo organ), a new one from Jonas Nordwall at the Berkeley Theatre (now up to = 35 ranks from 20 of a few years ago), and a fine sounding one from the Clydebank Town Hall near Glasgow, Scotland, played by Keith Beckingham.   There's also the "King of Kings" silent movie accompanied by the Skinner organ at Jefferson Avenue Presbyterian Church in Detroit.   Bill    
(back) Subject: Re: composers' performances (was purity) From: "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com> Date: Sat, 04 Dec 2004 17:35:36 -0600   Hello! I agree with virtually everything mentioned in your post, Colin, with the exception of one thing. That is your comment about Mr. Lind's position as a composer.   Having read Mr. Lind's post, I think he takes a more moderate position to a performer's faithfulness than what you seem to give him credit for. The idea that I felt Mr. Lind was trying to convey was that of abosolute fidelity to whatever intentions of the composer within the confines of the typical constraints of organ performance in general. Having a different acoustic or different stoplist or whatever else does not exempt the performer from trying as best as he/she can to attend to the markings the composer has rendered. So also do such things not exempt the performer from being a sensitive interpreter. What I believe would truly disappoint Mr. Lind or any other composer for that matter is when a performer is not musically astute enought to be expressive and to attend as best as he or she can to the intentions of the composer. For instance, if a composer has indicated a certain effect for a certain portion of music, it is the performer's OBLIGATION to attempt to recreate that AS CLOSE AS POSSIBLE given the circumstances. I would expect that any composer would be sorely disappointed with less.   It all comes down to us trying to be the best musicians we can in all circumstances.     Advent Blessings, Beau Surratt      
(back) Subject: Joke stops From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Sat, 4 Dec 2004 18:31:53 -0600   Well, if I were to have a "joke stop," I'm trying to decide which of these two would be best (oh, what the heck--I'll have both!):   1. Stop knob says (redundantly) Soft Dulciana 8'. Really activates the State Trumpet 16' 8' 4'.   OR   2. Stop knob says Flute D'Amour 4' but activates full organ replay of = "The Stripper."   Dennis Steckley Lover of Cats, Pipe Organs & 1940-65 Sewing Machines    
(back) Subject: Re: composers' performances (was purity) From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 4 Dec 2004 17:21:57 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   I think I would also reciprocate in agreeing with everything Beau says.   Musicianship is something people either have or haven't got, I'm afraid.   I think Beau has read more into what I wrote than was intended. Of course, I would always respect the musical directions, but I may feel obliged to alter things if something is not available or simply isn't right for the music.   To this end, I play any number of carefully selected romantic works on a baroque organ!! It's amazing how one can "get around things" and make the music work very often.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Beau Surratt <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com> wrote:   > Hello! > I agree with virtually everything mentioned in > your post, Colin, with > the exception of one thing. That is your comment > about Mr. Lind's position > as a composer.       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - Helps protect you from nasty viruses. http://promotions.yahoo.com/new_mail  
(back) Subject: Glossy Paint From: "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com> Date: Sat, 04 Dec 2004 17:24:55 -0800   =3D-> I asked a national paint resource lab, who suggested oil-based gloss enamel. We can't use gloss - it's a worship space not an education hall. Is oil-based enamel, either flat or egg-shell, what you mean by acoustic paint? The more specifics in your responses, the better. <-=3D     Well, first of all I don't see what's wrong with using gloss or semi-gloss paint in a sanctuary. I've seen it many, many times and it has never struck me as looking "education hall-ish" other than the one church I can think of that's painted in off-white, with large areas of pale magenta accents and then robin's egg blue trim. Kinda tacky. Especially with the maroon carpeting and dark oak / white pews and pulpit furniture.   To speak from personal experience, we recently had the sanctuary at Holy Trinity painted. It's a very dead room. They haven't gone for pew pads yet but there have been hints. But there is carpeting all over the chancel, across the front of the nave and down the three aisles. Thick, icky, living-room-blue orlon carpeting. And there's an exposed-beam ceiling with untreated wood surfaces. Dry, dry, dry.   Anyway, all the time I have been there the walls and arches have been painted flat white. This time, however, someone came up with the idea of using gloss white in the chancel and balcony, and semi-gloss in the nave. It looks very lovely, all off-white.   My Lord, what a change in the acoustics. That one change has made all the difference in the world. Even the pastor, who is generally loathe to concede that a resonant sanctuary is good, had to admit that his speaking voice sounds much better now -- carries better and has a nice "ring."   So, rather than eschew gloss paint, if you want to improve the acoustics and they won't let you rip up the carpeting, then GO for it.   ~ C      
(back) Subject: Cromorne & Mutations From: "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com> Date: Sat, 04 Dec 2004 17:32:47 -0800   =3D-> I want the Cromorne on the Pos/Ch and the Cornet, mounted and unenclosed, on the Great where it can be used as in the Olde Englishe music or with the reeds for other stuff. <-=3D     Assuming an electric console, here's a novel idea - especially on an instrument of modest resources ... why not duplex the mutatations AND the Cromorne, onto both Great AND Positif? Unless, of course, you have room and $$ to put an independent set of them on each manual.....   ~ C    
(back) Subject: The stuff of nightmares! From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 4 Dec 2004 17:55:03 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   I just had to share something I just read with pipechat.   Whilst bashing away at the novel I am writing (and periodically jumping up to play a piece of music or rattle away on the computer to pipechat) I have also been listening to the CD I bought in Holland of organs in the Groningen region.   The very comprehensive booklet, with historic details and specifications, is highly informative.   Listening to the splendid Nicolaus Bruhns Preludium in G, I started to read about the organ in the Aa-kerk, Groningen and my eyes almost popped out.....what a tangled history!   Apparently, Schnitger had built an organ for another church (the Academiekerk, Groningen) in 1702, but had used pipework from a previous instrument by Andres de Mare.   In 1710, the tower of the Aa-kerk collapsed, taking with it the organ Schnitger had built in 1697, and leaving the church without an instrument until 1816. At that point, the organ builder Johan Wilhelm Timpe took the Schnitger organ out of the Academiekerk, and installed it in the Aa-kerk with very few alterations.   In 1830, Johan Wilhelm Timpe replaced the Boorstwerk with a Bovenwerk.   In 1857, the organ was revised fairly drastically. The Hoofdwerk was enlarged and changes were made to the voicing. The pitch of the instrument was also altered at this time. In addition, the case was modified and new keyboards were made.   In recent years, further changes to the composition and specification took place.   Until 1977, the organ had quite an international reputation; being regarded as one of the most important instruments in the Netherlands. At this time, the restoration of the church was undertaken, during which, the church was threatened with possible collapse.   Consequently, the organ was hurriedly taken down and placed in safe keeping.   It was re-intsalled (unrestored) in 1989 and made playable once again by the brother Reil, of Heerde, under the watchful eyes of the consultant, the late Klaas Bolt. No further work has been done to the instrument.   So how does this very unsettled and altered Schnitger organ sound, after being uprooted twice and worked upon fairly drastically?   Miraculously, it sounds absolutely superb, I'm glad to report and perhaps demonstrates just how long the traditions of the early 18th century carried on well into the 19th century in Holland.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK         __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Meet the all-new My Yahoo! - Try it today! http://my.yahoo.com    
(back) Subject: Re: composers' performances (was purity) From: "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com> Date: Sat, 04 Dec 2004 19:57:31 -0600   Hi! I know what you mean about playing romantic and contemporary works on baroque organs. One of the most beautiful performances of Reger I've ever heard was on the Hillebrand/Moore organ at the United Church on the Green in New Haven, CT. This was in conjuction with the Yale Organ Week program for young organists a few years ago. Another memorable performance was by David Schrader of the Alain Fantasies and Litanies on the new 2 manual Bigelow at the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago.     Blessings, Beau Surratt Director of Music and Organist First United Lutheran Church, ELCA 6705 Hohman Ave. Hammond, IN 46324     -----Original Message----- From: Colin Mitchell <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Sat, 4 Dec 2004 17:21:57 -0800 (PST) Subject: Re: composers' performances (was purity)   > Hello, > > I think I would also reciprocate in agreeing with > everything Beau says. > > Musicianship is something people either have or > haven't got, I'm afraid. > > I think Beau has read more into what I wrote than was > intended. Of course, I would always respect the > musical directions, but I may feel obliged to alter > things if something is not available or simply isn't > right for the music. > > To this end, I play any number of carefully selected > romantic works on a baroque organ!! It's amazing how > one can "get around things" and make the music work > very often. > > Regards, > > Colin Mitchell UK > > > --- Beau Surratt <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com> > wrote: > > > Hello! > > I agree with virtually everything mentioned in > > your post, Colin, with > > the exception of one thing. That is your comment > > about Mr. Lind's position > > as a composer. > > > > > __________________________________ > Do you Yahoo!? > Yahoo! Mail - Helps protect you from nasty viruses. > http://promotions.yahoo.com/new_mail > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >      
(back) Subject: Re: Glossy Paint From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Sat, 4 Dec 2004 20:20:40 -0600   When I mentioned the superb acoustics of our church, with 4 secs. of = reverb in a building holding 200, I forgot to mention that the painted brick = walls have never been treated in any way and are painted with normal silk finish paint. They are currently a buff color, which I don't like. They were originally a light green and my vote is that the next time the church is repainted they should be restored to their original color, but I don't = think that makes any difference to the acoustics. I am also rather sceptical whether the use of flat/silk/semigloss/gloss paint makes a discernible difference either. Having a carpet or pew cushions does.   John Speller   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, December 04, 2004 7:24 PM Subject: Glossy Paint     > =3D-> I asked a national paint resource lab, who suggested > oil-based gloss enamel. We can't use gloss - it's a worship > space not an education hall. Is oil-based enamel, either > flat or egg-shell, what you mean by acoustic paint? The more > specifics in your responses, the better. <-=3D > > > Well, first of all I don't see what's wrong with using gloss > or semi-gloss paint in a sanctuary. I've seen it many, many > times and it has never struck me as looking "education > hall-ish" other than the one church I can think of that's > painted in off-white, with large areas of pale magenta > accents and then robin's egg blue trim. Kinda tacky. > Especially with the maroon carpeting and dark oak / white > pews and pulpit furniture. > > To speak from personal experience, we recently had the > sanctuary at Holy Trinity painted. It's a very dead room. > They haven't gone for pew pads yet but there have been > hints. But there is carpeting all over the chancel, across > the front of the nave and down the three aisles. Thick, > icky, living-room-blue orlon carpeting. And there's an > exposed-beam ceiling with untreated wood surfaces. Dry, dry, > dry. > > Anyway, all the time I have been there the walls and arches > have been painted flat white. This time, however, someone > came up with the idea of using gloss white in the chancel > and balcony, and semi-gloss in the nave. It looks very > lovely, all off-white. > > My Lord, what a change in the acoustics. That one change has > made all the difference in the world. Even the pastor, who > is generally loathe to concede that a resonant sanctuary is > good, had to admit that his speaking voice sounds much > better now -- carries better and has a nice "ring." > > So, rather than eschew gloss paint, if you want to improve > the acoustics and they won't let you rip up the carpeting, > then GO for it.      
(back) Subject: Re: Cromorne & Mutations From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Sat, 4 Dec 2004 20:25:13 -0600   It would probably be better to duplex the Cromorne and leave the Cornet where it was. Flue stops behave better on slider chests, whereas reed = stops are happier on pouch chests, so if you have all the reeds on unit chests = (as you probably should for best results) it would be easy to duplex the Cromorne. It would also be nice to have the Cromorne available at 4 ft. pitch on the Pedal for chorale preludes.   John Speller   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, December 04, 2004 7:32 PM Subject: Cromorne & Mutations     > =3D-> I want the Cromorne on the Pos/Ch and the Cornet, > mounted and unenclosed, on the Great where it can be used as > in the Olde Englishe music or with the reeds for other > stuff. <-=3D > > > Assuming an electric console, here's a novel idea - > especially on an instrument of modest resources ... why not > duplex the mutatations AND the Cromorne, onto both Great AND > Positif? Unless, of course, you have room and $$ to put an > independent set of them on each manual.....      
(back) Subject: Re: Glossy Paint From: "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net> Date: Sat, 04 Dec 2004 21:35:23 -0500   From personal experience, I can attest that a change from flat to eggshell style paint can make a significant difference. First Presbyterian Church in Utica, NY, seats over 700 and has very high flat ceilings. It was always favorable for music, but when the church was repainted a few years ago, the decision was made to do everything in two coats of eggshell in an effort to enhance the acoustics. The difference was immediately obvious. A major classical CD produced recently used the space to record two forthcoming piano discs, most of his previous recording having been done in the New York City area. He told me that the acoustics in First Church are in his opinion the equal of Carnegie Hall. That wouldn't have been the case in the days of flat finish paint!   Steve Best in Utica, NY   John L. Speller wrote:   >I am also rather sceptical >whether the use of flat/silk/semigloss/gloss paint makes a discernible >difference either. Having a carpet or pew cushions does. > >      
(back) Subject: Re: What is Acoustic Sealant Paint? From: <SWF12262@aol.com> Date: Sat, 4 Dec 2004 21:38:34 EST   What is Acoustic Sealant Paint?       I honestly don't know the details about the paint, but I think it might = have contained some kind of epoxy or resin that dries to a very hard, sound-reflective finish. That was one of the details handled by our organ = builder -- perhaps yours, or one of the very knowledgeable builders on the list can provide more detail. Steve  
(back) Subject: Re: Glossy Paint From: "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net> Date: Sat, 4 Dec 2004 20:52:11 -0600   Perhaps it was the additional coat of paint that made the difference, instead of the type of paint. I believe that most absorption tables found in acoustical reference books show little difference with type of paint. Roy Redman ----- Original Message ----- From: "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, December 04, 2004 8:35 PM Subject: Re: Glossy Paint     > From personal experience, I can attest that a change from flat to > eggshell style paint can make a significant difference. First > Presbyterian Church in Utica, NY, seats over 700 and has very high flat > ceilings. It was always favorable for music, but when the church was > repainted a few years ago, the decision was made to do everything in two > coats of eggshell in an effort to enhance the acoustics. The difference > was immediately obvious. A major classical CD produced recently used > the space to record two forthcoming piano discs, most of his previous > recording having been done in the New York City area. He told me that > the acoustics in First Church are in his opinion the equal of Carnegie > Hall. That wouldn't have been the case in the days of flat finish = paint! > > Steve Best in Utica, NY > > John L. Speller wrote: > > >I am also rather sceptical > >whether the use of flat/silk/semigloss/gloss paint makes a discernible > >difference either. Having a carpet or pew cushions does. > > > > > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Glossy Paint From: "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net> Date: Sat, 04 Dec 2004 21:47:51 -0500   Could not copy the message to the digest, there was no plain text part
(back) Subject: Re: What is acoustic sealant paint? From: "Kenneth Potter" <swell_shades@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 4 Dec 2004 19:24:30 -0800 (PST)   I am fascinated by this discussion. We are in the process of finishing up restoration (a two year process) of a 1740 house in Rockland County, New York. This house was the home of Clement Heaton, a stained glass artist. In 1930 he built an addition to the house, a studio where he could assemble his church windows. It has an 11 1/2 ft. ceiling, and is basically a bunker of solid concrete. The roof structure is two feet thick of concrete and steel. The walls are concrete. This room is going to house my residence organ - just a three rank Moller Artiste from 1948. I am depending on stunning acoustics to make it into something. The floors are white oak over a double layer of 3/4 inch plywood on glue-lam beams. Very rigid. The walls are very thick sheetrock and insulation over the original concrete walls. THe walls are lined with white oak quarter-sawn wainscot to the height of 6'. The wainscot is getting 17 coats of finish to give it a rich finish that will not be glossy, but solid. The wall paint above will be acrylic, sort of semigloss. Likewise the ceiling. I hope that this will yield a reverberant environment. Maybe not so great for conversation, but great for organ. John Randolph of Leonia, NJ is doing the installation. I'll put up photos when it is finished in another 6 weeks. We're already living in the house, with the Flentrop up and running in the dining room - we just don't have a living room.   During my time of teaching in an elementary school (Orff-Schulwerk) I experienced the changes in acoustics that happened in large spaces when painted with flat latex paint as opposed to glossy enamel. The flat paint basically killed acoustics. Glossy is better. I'm trying to get a finish that is hard, but not glossy. Good luck to me.   Ken   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D The National Government will regard it as its first and foremost duty to = revive in the nation the spirit of unity and cooperation, It will = preserve and defend those basic principles on which our nation has been = built. It regards Christianity as the foundation of our national = morality, and the family as the basis of national life." --Adolph Hitler, February 1, 1933 (what goes around comes around)  
(back) Subject: Re: Chivas Regal 4/5' From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> Date: Sun, 05 Dec 2004 11:52:48 +0800   Ahh, a flask for the lonely organist in his/her cold organ loft. Does the c= onsole come with a flying lady hood ornament too?     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Subject: Re: Chivas Regal 4/5' > Hello, >=20 > Whenever I sit at the sumptious console of old > Harrison & Harrison organs, I always feel that they > should have a blank stop, which when pulled, opens a > polished wood cocktail cabinet such as Rolls-Royce > motors had/have. >=20 > In fact, there is one cathedral organ in Europe, which > has exactly this! >=20 > Regards, >=20 > Colin Mitchell UK >=20 > > Please enlighten me...I'm not a drinker, so I know > > I'm missing something here.   -- Jan Nijhuis nijhuis@email.com   --=20 ___________________________________________________________ Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm    
(back) Subject: Re: Chivas Regal 4/5' From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> Date: Sun, 05 Dec 2004 12:00:52 +0800   for that matter, one gets the "tremulants". :-)   ----- Original Message ----- From: Georgewbayley@aol.com To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Chivas Regal 4/5' Date: Sat, 4 Dec 2004 14:38:24 EST   > The humour is that when one indulges too heavily in Chivas Regal or any o= ther > spirit, for that matter, one gets the "shakes". >=20 > George -- Jan Nijhuis nijhuis@email.com   --=20 ___________________________________________________________ Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm    
(back) Subject: RE: pipe organs in chapels of churches From: "Vincent S. Parks, III" <vparks@houston.rr.com> Date: Sat, 4 Dec 2004 23:08:59 -0600     Gloria Dei Lutheran Church in Houston has a 2/26 Schlicker (1978) in the Chapel.   Vince Parks Executive Director of Ministry       ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>        
(back) Subject: RE: pipe organs in chapels of churches From: "Vincent S. Parks, III" <vparks@houston.rr.com> Date: Sat, 4 Dec 2004 23:19:30 -0600   Whoops - should have read farther to note the question was 4 manual instruments in chapels. Our 4 manual is in the Worship Center.   Vince Parks   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Vincent S. Parks, III Sent: Saturday, December 04, 2004 11:09 PM To: 'PipeChat' Subject: RE: pipe organs in chapels of churches       Gloria Dei Lutheran Church in Houston has a 2/26 Schlicker (1978) in the Chapel.   Vince Parks Executive Director of Ministry       ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>         ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>