PipeChat Digest #4968 - Monday, December 6, 2004
 
Richard Webster's music
  by "Jonathan Humbert" <jhumbert@ptd.net>
Re: Diaphone qua navigational aid
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Richard Webster's music
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Wexford Carol
  by "Robert Nickel" <rnickel@charter.net>
Re: Diaphone qua navigational aid
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Joke stops
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
Re: Joke stops
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Richard Webster's music
  by "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Joke stops
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Joke stops
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Diaphone qua navigational aid
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Joke stops
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
Re: (nomenclature)
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Re: Diaphonic pipes
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
RE: Diaphone
  by "LBoekeloo" <lboekeloo@triton.net>
Rodgers 945
  by <OrganMD@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Richard Webster's music From: "Jonathan Humbert" <jhumbert@ptd.net> Date: Sun, 5 Dec 2004 16:33:51 -0500   Hi List,   =20   Does anyone know if Richard Webster has had his Paschal Suite = for Trumpet and Organ published? I have opportunity to play at Easter time = with an accomplished trumpeter. If no one knows about the published-ness of = this piece, does anyone have an email address for Richard Webster. I love = this piece and would love to share it with others. Thanks a lot for any help = you can give.   =20   Regards,   Jonathan Humbert   =20   PS: I went to a concert on Saturday night at Neffsville Mennonite = Church (PA). The choir sang Saint-Saens Christmas Oratorio and Handel=92s = Utrecht Te Deum and Utrecht Jubilate. The organist was Gary P. Garletts (organist = at Ardmore Presbyterian in Philadelphia and Artistic Director of the = Chester County Choral Society). I must just let everyone know how much of a = treat this was. The organ (a Schantz) sounded impressive for both styles and better yet, the Gary was completely in command of the instrument. A wonderful time, indeed.     --=20 No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.289 / Virus Database: 265.4.5 - Release Date: 12/3/2004 =20  
(back) Subject: Re: Diaphone qua navigational aid From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 5 Dec 2004 13:50:17 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   I "think" Alan, that it was organ first and fog-horn second; the latter a rather more beneficial invention.   To quote from the Lancaster Theatre Organ Trust's website, it says:-     ......typical of these was the patent for the well know Diaphone, originally numbered 21,414 in 1894, this leading to a further patent number 21,558 in 1895 of improvements, to be followed in 1897 by patent number 21,389 for a foghorn for use in lighthouses and still used today.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       Alan Freed <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> wrote:   > > My question is: Did Mr. Hope-Jones invent them > for maritime use, and then > > adapt them to Our Instrument, or was it vice > versa?       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - Easier than ever with enhanced search. Learn more. http://info.mail.yahoo.com/mail_250  
(back) Subject: Re: Richard Webster's music From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Sun, 5 Dec 2004 16:08:30 -0600   At 4:33 PM -0500 12/5/04, Jonathan Humbert wrote: >Hi List, > > Does anyone know if Richard Webster has had his Paschal >Suite for Trumpet and Organ published? I have opportunity to play >at Easter time with an accomplished trumpeter. If no one knows >about the published-ness of this piece, does anyone have an email >address for Richard Webster. I love this piece and would love to >share it with others. Thanks a lot for any help you can give. >   Jonathan   Richard's music is published by Advent Press http://www.advent-press.com/   David  
(back) Subject: Wexford Carol From: "Robert Nickel" <rnickel@charter.net> Date: Sun, 5 Dec 2004 16:21:58 -0600   Noel Jones has written a prelude based on "Wexford Carol." It is from the book titled TWO CAROLS AND TWO HYMNTUNES. It is available from www.frogmusic.com.   Thanks, Noel.          
(back) Subject: Re: Diaphone qua navigational aid From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 05 Dec 2004 17:55:33 -0500   On 12/5/04 4:50 PM, "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:   > I "think" Alan, that it was organ first and fog-horn second; the latter = a > rather more beneficial invention. > > To quote from the Lancaster Theatre Organ Trust's website, it says:- > > .....typical of these was the patent for the well know Diaphone, = originally > numbered 21,414 in 1894, this leading to a further patent number 21,558 = in > 1895 of improvements, to be followed in 1897 by patent number 21,389 for = a > foghorn for use in lighthouses and still used today.   THANK you, Colin! Who else would have believed me if you hadn't said = that?   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Joke stops From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Sun, 5 Dec 2004 17:56:12 EST   Dennis et List,   Some joke stop thoughts:   At a certain church in Texas where I was briefly organist some years ago, there existed several "alternate" drawknob-faceplates with some very funny =   "alternate" nominclature. We used to put them on for guest organists on = occasion, to get a laugh: a guest organist might be surprised to find a 32' Carpet Compensator or a =   16' Furtz-Trompette, for instance.   My all-time favorite joke stop I would love to see realized in a proposal from a builder, however, is this: the Kitchen Sink stop, which when pulled = would activate the flowing of water from every tap in the building, including = the water closets.   Cheers, Bill H. Boston  
(back) Subject: Re: Joke stops From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 05 Dec 2004 18:19:15 -0500   On 12/5/04 5:56 PM, "DERREINETOR@aol.com" <DERREINETOR@aol.com> wrote:   > the Kitchen Sink stop, which when pulled would activate the flowing of wa= ter > from every tap in the building, including the water closets.   You mean, as in toilets? (Couldn=B9t hurt!)   Nah=8BI don=B9t think so. Good joke. Fine for =B3Water Music=B2 and =B3An Wasserfl=FCssen Babylon.=B2 But just too much mechanics involved. Fun idea, though! The best ones involve the trap door in the pulpit floor. Tough mechanics there, too; yet . . . . .   Alan, with many hours in the pulpit to his credit or deficit  
(back) Subject: Re: Richard Webster's music From: "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com> Date: Sun, 05 Dec 2004 17:26:27 -0600   Hi! Technically the "Paschal Suite" is published by Augsburg Fortress though you can purchase it through Advent Press which is Mr. Webster's own publishing company. I would also highly reccomend any of his other music- some of it, like the Paschal Suite, can be challenging, but it is all well worth the effort for good quality contemporary church music. His hymn settings for choir, brass, and organ, are superb.     Blessings, Beau Surratt Director of Music and Organist First United Lutheran Church, ELCA 6705 Hohman Ave. Hammond, IN 46324      
(back) Subject: Re: Joke stops From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 5 Dec 2004 15:28:22 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   I don't want to be pedantic....but....   I think this is a misnomer for the well-known German register, the Kuche Zink. (that's with two omelletes over the u, of course).   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       > On 12/5/04 5:56 PM, "DERREINETOR@aol.com" > <DERREINETOR@aol.com> wrote: > > > the Kitchen Sink stop   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Joke stops From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 5 Dec 2004 15:28:30 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   I don't want to be pedantic....but....   I think this is a misnomer for the well-known German register, the Kuche Zink. (that's with two omelletes over the u, of course).   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       > On 12/5/04 5:56 PM, "DERREINETOR@aol.com" > <DERREINETOR@aol.com> wrote: > > > the Kitchen Sink stop   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Diaphone qua navigational aid From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 05 Dec 2004 18:43:32 -0500   A friend on another list (whom I obviously copied), and from our shared college days in the early 1950s, reports from San Francisco:   Most diaphone foghorns have been retired and replaced with electronic beepers. One of the exceptions, thanks to historic preservationists, is = the one on the Golden Gate Bridge. A mighty blast indeed! Someone posted that the air pressure has been reduced somewhat, and it isn't quite as loud as = it used to be.   Sometimes, on a quiet early Sunday morning when the air is chill and = there's no wind, and the roar of traffic on US 101 is diminished, I can hear it = from the top of my street, which is about five miles over the hills from the GG Bridge. The beeps from several horns and ships on the Bay are more common.   Hope-Jones's invention was more commonly used for foghorns than for = organs, I think.   Quoting friend Jim (whom many know from another list).   Alan  
(back) Subject: Re: Joke stops From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Sun, 5 Dec 2004 19:23:14 EST   Colin,   Actually, the Kuchenzink has been described most famously by the great Bavarian organ builder, Graf Regner zu Wolken -und -Nebel in his treatise = "Orgelbau fuer Trotteln" (Organ Building for Idiots):   "The Kuchenzink- unlike its British false-cognate, the Kitchen Sink- = concerns itself with Untersatz rather than Oberwerk. While the Kitchen Sink sounds = in the upper octaves, i.e., often of 4 and 2 foot pitch, the Kuchenzink and = its close relative, the Klosettzink, gurgles below. With a high lead content, = it is often tuned with a large quantity of lye and water. It benefits from being =   capped with a grate and shortened by the use of a U-shaped elbow. = Functions best as a rank of 16 to 32 foot pitch; is more problematic in smaller scale. = The Klosettzink's odd but satisfying tone has been known to make ladies = blush."   --Orgelbau fuer Trotteln, second edition, Witzdrueck u. Soehne, Haeusl-im-Wald, Bayern, 1916.   Couldn't resist, Bill H. Boston.              
(back) Subject: Re: (nomenclature) From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Mon, 6 Dec 2004 08:59:14 +0800   Ratzburg (sp?) Cathedral has one but it is not called Bourbon. BE. ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Wuxuzusu@aol.com=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Cc: Georgewbayley@aol.com=20 Sent: Sunday, December 05, 2004 11:50 PM Subject: (nomenclature)     Which church organ has a drawknob labeled "Bourbon" which when drawn = dispenses real bourbon?   ...or is this another urban legend?   Stan Krider   In a message dated 12/04/2004 12:26:51 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, = pipechat@pipechat.org writes: Sent: Wednesday, December 01, 2004 5:01 PM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: (nomenclature)         On the new Choir/Solo divison to be installed next month in my = church, there will be a Chivas Regal 4/5. Draw your own conclusions.          
(back) Subject: Re: Diaphonic pipes From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sun, 5 Dec 2004 21:01:36 EST   Valvular voices such as the Diaphone can be made to a variety of = scales in both wood and metal. Depending upon the maker, one could find 16' = Diaphones in varieties ranging from mild and horn-like to the gut-punching, = rock-crusher type (which seems to be the way such stops have been stereotyped). They = are particularly effective at 32', at which they can be heart in species such = as the String Diaphone in Philadelphia, to the very large, almost purely fundamental voices heard in cinema organs. Speech development is extraordinarily prompt because the frequency is generated by the motor assembly within the boot, NOT by having to excite = an entire air column before frequency is established, as it would be with a = normal flue pipe. I have heard experimental pipes, down into the 64' octave, in which a pulse generator activated an electromagnet that in turn activated a = standard pneumatic pouch. A full-length resonator was not necessary, for some = reason. The sound was almost instantaneous, quite thunderous, smooth, and full, and = was "tunable" by a rheostat that varied the frequency of the pulse generator. = If fully developed, this would be a good solution to winded 32' stops. At 8' pitch and above, they are less effective, and Diaphones were frequently downward extensions of very large-scaled, thick-walled, = high-cut Diapasons, often with leathered labia and deep nicking of the languids. = When this treatment was used in church organs of the 1920s, "Diapason Phonon" could = be seen as the manual designation at 8'.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City   ..  
(back) Subject: RE: Diaphone From: "LBoekeloo" <lboekeloo@triton.net> Date: Sun, 5 Dec 2004 21:44:59 -0500   I've heard the Wicks Diaphone and it has a presence when played. If one has the room, this would be a great stop addition to a large instrument. However, the diaphone is not as loud as their large scale 32' double trombone on the Wicks at First Congregational in Kalamazoo, Michigan.   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Keith Zimmerman Sent: Sunday, December 05, 2004 3:09 PM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Diaphone   There has been some interesting activity on the DIY pipe organ list this weekend, but out of that came a little discussion about 32 & 64' stops - more specifically, a diaphone. The following Wicks link was given:   (http://organ.wicks.com/news/archive/2003/101403.htm).   For some reason I have always assumed that the diaphone was a very loud reed stop. I remember reading about it in Audsley and/or Barnes when I was in college. Maybe it was my interpretation of the picture of its design that caused me to assume this. This Wicks link seems to hint that it is a powerful but not necessarily loud stop.   Is this the kind of stop that would be useful to the home pipe organ enthusiast who wishes to add fullness and quickness to the bass?   Could anyone please enlighten me.   Thanks, Keith.     ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>          
(back) Subject: Rodgers 945 From: <OrganMD@aol.com> Date: Sun, 5 Dec 2004 22:19:59 EST   Hi Gang .............. I have a former client that is the owner of a Rodgers model 945 three = manual digital electronic organ. Aging and the need to downsize her life = requires the sale of this instrument. This organ has spent its entire life in a residential installation. Please send me a private reply if you have = interest in this instrument. Bill