PipeChat Digest #4971 - Monday, December 6, 2004
 
Re: I wonder what Funeral Homes have pipe organs?
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
nomenclature
  by <Wuxuzusu@aol.com>
Weird request
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: I wonder what Funeral Homes have pipe organs?
  by <TheOrganst@aol.com>
RE: I wonder what Funeral Homes have pipe organs?
  by "Staffan Thuringer" <staffan_thuringer@yahoo.com.au>
I wonder what Funeral Homes have pipe organs?
  by <Wuxuzusu@aol.com>
Re: Glossy Paint
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: 25 note pedalboard
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: I wonder what Funeral Homes have pipe organs?
  by <TheOrganst@aol.com>
Re: Funeral Home pipe organs?
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re:Funeral Homes with pipe organs
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: Funeral Homes with pipe organs
  by "Robert Ehrhardt" <r_ehrh@bellsouth.net>
Re: I wonder what Funeral Homes have pipe organs?
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net>
Re: Weird request
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: Funeral Homes with pipe organs
  by <OMusic@aol.com>
Re: I wonder what Funeral Homes have pipe organs?
  by "John Jarvis" <jljarvis@comcast.net>
Re: Funeral Homes
  by <Justinhartz@aol.com>
Re: 25 note pedalboard
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
Re: Funeral Homes
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: 25 note pedalboard
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: I wonder what Funeral Homes have pipe organs? From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 6 Dec 2004 19:56:23 EST   Dear Steven: For the sake of accuracy The Rose Hills Quimby has 64 ranks. The Choir division is highly unified using the Silver Flute at several = pitches and some solo stops duplexed. It's a terrific organ, and I played it for the first hour of opening day. It was June 1, 1996. I could be off a year as it was a long time ago and using only recollection. Let's just say It's the biggest funeral/wedding venue I know about as far as the size of the organ. Forest Lawn has several Estey's probably four in their two main older facilities in CA and I don't think any of them are playing anymore. They won't spend the money to maintain them. A famous transcription organist formerly from St. Margaret's London Played them and was burried there in 1934. Mind is gone with the wind. His favorite was a highly carved Estey of three manuals now since dumped. He's buried quite near where the old console was. I guess Forest Lawn must protect their bottom line, stock holders, well you know what I mean. They buy junk organs for regular services. I guess they figure nobody will notice. HMMMMPH! Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: nomenclature From: <Wuxuzusu@aol.com> Date: Mon, 6 Dec 2004 19:59:40 EST   Bob, Thanks. What is the stop named? Was it installed to help the organist = through choir practices, keep him (her) warm during mid week practice sessions in = the cold German winters, or were his working conditions that bad? Stan Krider     bobelms writes:   Ratzburg (sp?) Cathedral has one but it is not called Bourbon. BE.  
(back) Subject: Weird request From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Mon, 06 Dec 2004 18:59:43 -0600   Don't laugh. I'm looking for a piano-vocal score for the full arrangement of "Light My Fire" by the Doors. I did a Google search and found a book for 19 pounds, which seemed a little steep for the one piece I wanted. Yes, I have paid more money for sillier things, but the kinder, gentler Glenda in a conservative world now has second thoughts.     Reason? Let's just say that I made a flip remark last week about improvisation, and I've been dared to follow through. What with long hours at work, organ practice as much as I can, job interviews, and being on the road a lot, coupled with little sleep, I'm just too tired and lazy to figure the basic arrangement out on my own. I will or will buy the exorbitantly priced book if I have to, but hope someone has the single for sale.   Thanks.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Re: I wonder what Funeral Homes have pipe organs? From: <TheOrganst@aol.com> Date: Mon, 6 Dec 2004 20:06:05 EST   All five Forest Lawn Memorial Parks had or have pipe organs in each of = their chapels. Glendale Forest Lawn - 3/12 Estey , 3/10 Estey, 2/12 Estey Hollywood Hills Forest Lawn - 2/17 J.W. Steere and Sons Tracker, 2/10 HillGreen-Lane Covina Hills Forest Lawn - 2/5 Moller Artiste Cypress Forest Lawn - 2/6 Kilgen (now in my living room) Long Beach Forest Lawn - unknown, removed many years ago Several of the Pierce Bro's chain of Mortuary's had pipe organs but none = are left Numerous independent So. Cal Funeral Homes had pipe organs 2 of which = ended up in my house. Quite a few of these older organs were also player pipe organs. Kyle B. Irwin K & L Pipe Organ Service Organist - 1st Baptist Church of Los Angeles Organist - Forest Lawn Memorial Parks  
(back) Subject: RE: I wonder what Funeral Homes have pipe organs? From: "Staffan Thuringer" <staffan_thuringer@yahoo.com.au> Date: Tue, 7 Dec 2004 12:06:23 +1100 (EST)     > Have you ever seen a pipe organ in a Funeral Home? Dear Listers, In Stockholm, Sweden, there is a large cemetery called = 'Skogskyrkog=E5rden' ('The forest cemetary') with at least three funeral = chapels. I played for a funeral in one of these chapels in 2002, 'Hoppets = kapell (the 'Chapel of the Hope'). There was a 1950-style pipe organ with = free standing pipes, and plexi glass swell shutters. The pipes looked a = bit dis-organized and out of line, and, true enough, the console was = actually an Allen organ, the pipes were only left there 'for show'.. Regards Staffan Thuringer       --------------------------------- Find local movie times and trailers on Yahoo! Movies.  
(back) Subject: I wonder what Funeral Homes have pipe organs? From: <Wuxuzusu@aol.com> Date: Mon, 6 Dec 2004 20:07:32 EST   In central Ohio, Schoedinger Funeral Home has an old Estey 6-8 ranks.   Another in Newark, OH, has(had?) a Wurlitzer installed therein.   Stan Krider   In a message dated 12/06/2004 3:24:56 PM Eastern Standard Time, Jerry = Richer writes:   Have you ever seen a pipe organ in a Funeral Home? Can you describe it? I know they exist. I've never seen one. I'm curious I guess because = I grew up in a Funeral Home and never heard of a pipe organ in one.  
(back) Subject: Re: Glossy Paint From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Mon, 6 Dec 2004 20:09:42 EST   In a message dated 12/5/2004 9:52:48 AM Eastern Standard Time, effarbee@verizon.net writes: So, whatever we do to repaint the walls will be with limited access and whatever we can get to stay on top of the sandy latex. This will be a lot of work, but it might bring these two division "out" a bit more. I would think that you would have success with a sealant base coat like = KILZ, which is intended to cover stained areas as a primer coat of white before applying a cover coat. As far as accessing the walls, I would just get = LONG roller handles for the wall(s) that you can access. Apply a coat (or even = 2) of the KILZ as a sealing primer, then at least 2 and preferrably 3 coats of hard drying enamel (important that it is enamel) gloss white.   it will be a daunating task to paint the chambers if the organ is in = place, so you ought to take every possible precaution while working in the = chambers. It is hard to give specific suggestions without visiting the chambers. One =   other comment...one thickness of sheetrock, even fastened to 2 X 6 studs = is not really a sufficiently stiff surface for organ chambers, as the single = thickness can vibrate sympathetically with the organ and dampen some of the sonic output. (similar to a large expanse of glass).   Rick M  
(back) Subject: Re: 25 note pedalboard From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 06 Dec 2004 17:19:02 -0800   Andy makes a good point we've talked about before ... those of us who grew up with non-standard pedal-boards (I started playing the organ at age 10; aside from lessons, I never had an AGO standard pedal-board to play until I went to college) seem to have less problem than those who learn exclusively on AGO boards and THEN try to switch. It isn't logical, and I don't know why, but there it is ...   OHS recitalists are faced with all kinds of non-standard pedal-boards. Locally we have a one-manual Johnson that has (I think) an 18-note pedal-board ... CC-F ... not lined up with ANYTHING ... in form, it's sort of a cross between a spinet pedal-board and a German baroque pedalboard ... short from back to front.   The point has been made that if one intends to play recitals in Europe, one is likely to find straight, flat 30-note pedalboards (except in England); historic organs in Portugal, Spain and Italy, of course, have only rudimentary pedals for holding long pedal-points, etc.   I'd really be curious as to other's experience with this ... if it's true that learning on an AGO pedalboard makes it harder to switch to others, why? Is it EXPOSURE to other pedalboards that makes the difference? Or is a technique developed solely on AGO pedalboards harder to transfer?   I remember watching Heiller play a recital on an AGO pedalboard ... he pedalled AS IF he was playing a straight, flat German pedalboard ... that was very interesting to watch (grin).   Cheers,   Bud          
(back) Subject: Re: I wonder what Funeral Homes have pipe organs? From: <TheOrganst@aol.com> Date: Mon, 6 Dec 2004 20:14:20 EST   I forgot one of the most famous. It's not in the funeral home itself but outside in the cemetery. Check out my web site for the world famous Roosevelt Memorial Park Outdoor = Wurlitzer. _http://members.aol.com/theorganst/Page1.html_ (http://members.aol.com/theorganst/Page1.html)  
(back) Subject: Re: Funeral Home pipe organs? From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 6 Dec 2004 20:22:07 EST   According to Raymond Bladderburst's "Encyclopaedia of American Funeral = Home Organs," there are three funeral home organs in Valley Crest, Mississippi:   (1) Granite Visor Funeral Services (II/3 Fedora Organ Co., 1924). This = organ has each rank in a separate expression enclosure. Although located in the basement, it speaks through ceiling grilles. The sound is reflected = through "tone chutes" by the use of small mirrors.   (2) Dirtnap Funeral Home (II/6 Patriot Organ Co., 1926). Two of the six = ranks are 109-pipe Vox Humana units, available at all pitches).   (3) Pushin' Up Daisies Drive-Through Funeral Emporium (I/137 Aagaalund & Aargh, 1979). This mechanical-action Scandinavian import sports a fairly = complete specification, and might have benefited from being split between two = manuals). It is also used for air shows at the nearby Air Force base.   Although this book is considered definitive, all of the information may = not be accurate...   ..  
(back) Subject: Re:Funeral Homes with pipe organs From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Mon, 6 Dec 2004 20:33:44 EST   >Would you have any comment on changes in taste in more >recent years? > >Alan   More and more, we have seen that families want to "personalize" the = services, tailoring them to tell a life story about a person, so often music is = brought in on CD that was the deceased's favorite. I have heard services with = Elvis singing gospel, I have heard Sarah McLachlan, I've heard beach music, jazz =   piano, etc. On one hand, I think it's great that families want to use = music that meant a lot to the deceased, ON THE OTHER HAND, as a musician, I cringe = when I hear some of the requests that people have because I feel that they have = no place in a religious service. Even if it's taking place at the funeral = home, I consider it a religious service if there is clergy involved. If the = family just wanted to play it softly during the visitation, it wouldn't bother me = one bit.   I would always prefer to have live musicians over recorded music, but how often could you just rouse up a Polka band in Charlotte, NC at the last = minute because Paw-Paw loved to dance the polka, and the family thinks it would = just be great if his casket could be rolled out of the church to "Roll Out the Barrel." In times like that, you almost have to resort to a CD of 101 = Greatest Polka Favorites and try to stand there with a straight face, because you = really don't want Miss Bonny Sue playing songs like that on the organ. I, would = gladly do a bang up job on something like that, but too often I'm needed to = escort family or pallbearers or doing something else at the end of a service, if = it hasn't been planned for me to play ahead of time.   In church services, it seems to still be the old standards...the Baptists will always love "Amazing Grace, " "In the Garden," "Blessed Assurance," = "Because He Lives," "When We All Get to Heaven," and others in that vein. The more =   main line and liturgical churches go for majestic hymns like "For All the Saints" or "A Mighty Fortress" and classical literature. I've had several = services where we've walked out to the Widor Toccata, Rigaudon by Campra, and even = the Mulet Carillon-Sortie. Personally, I like both extremes, just as long as = it's not recorded music.   Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Re: Funeral Homes with pipe organs From: "Robert Ehrhardt" <r_ehrh@bellsouth.net> Date: Mon, 06 Dec 2004 19:54:49 -0600   RMB10@aol.com wrote:   >>Would you have any comment on changes in taste in more >>recent years? >> >>Alan > > > More and more, we have seen that families want to "personalize" the = services, > tailoring them to tell a life story about a person [snip] ON THE OTHER HAND, as a musician, I cringe when > I hear some of the requests that people have because I feel that they = have no > place in a religious service.   Many years ago, when working in a music store, I often received calls from funeral home staff organists looking for sheet music for a service. My favorite request was for a song called "Here I Am in Dallas, Where the Hell Are You?'"   I never even knew that Heaven was located in North Central Texas!     -- Robert Ehrhardt Noel Memorial UMC, Shreveport, LA USA http://www.zimbel.com/ehrhardt.html     -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.289 / Virus Database: 265.4.6 - Release Date: 12/5/2004    
(back) Subject: Re: I wonder what Funeral Homes have pipe organs? From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 06 Dec 2004 20:16:15 -0600   When I worked tuning organs around central Iowa several years ago, I remember half a dozen funeral homes with pipe organs. All were Wicks, = with a couple of them even comprised of 6 or 8 (!!) individual ranks.   One of the small ones dated from the 40's or so, and was particularly curious because the top surface of all its rackboards had been completely covered in thick felt, punched thru with the rack hole pattern. Each of the pipes (IIRC, at least the metal ones) had a little metal bracket-like thing soldered onto its body near the rackboard (almost as if the pipes = had once been physically attached to the chest somehow, but they weren't...or maybe some kind of individual electrical pickup device?) and under the windchest lurked a couple of bakelite boxes appearing much like old tube-type table radios, but they also weren't - they were more like some kind of intercom unit. I don't recall the electronic boxes bearing the Wicks nameplate, but they did appear to somehow have "belonged" with the pipe organ. And I don't recall any evidence of microphones anywhere, or evidence that they had ever been there. The organ had normal swell shades =   opening into the chapel, and the little console was absolutely standard = for such an organ, with no evidence of any modifications.   I've always wondered what the real story was with that little organ. Perhaps it was some sort of prototype (?) of a pipe organ that could be electronically "piped" into various other locations within the funeral home, as needed? Anyone here ever heard of any such similar beastie lurking out there in the world?   I've got to also mention the lovely little Wurlitzer organ we heard this past summer at OHS Buffalo, in Forest Lawn (or was it Forest Park?) Cemetery, which was so wonderfully presented to the OHS group by Justin Hartz.   Cheers --   Tim      
(back) Subject: Re: Weird request From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Mon, 6 Dec 2004 21:24:55 EST   glenda, if you find it, maybe i could interest you in purchasing my arrangement of "louie louie" for handbell choir...   :)   scot  
(back) Subject: Re: Funeral Homes with pipe organs From: <OMusic@aol.com> Date: Mon, 6 Dec 2004 21:44:04 EST   In a message dated 12/6/04 7:56:50 PM Central Standard Time, r_ehrh@bellsouth.net writes:   << I never even knew that Heaven was located in North Central Texas! >> IT"s not! That's why we are going to Oklahoma. (just kidding, we do = really love Denton, but Keith feels it is time for a change, and I am delighted = to be going back to Chickasha.) Having played for 7 years in a funeral home in the downtown area of a = large metro, mostly older folk without insurance, I was introduced to many old favorites of the families, like, "Will the Circle Be Unbroken," etc. They = had a stack of old hymn books, mostly Stamps Baxter. My brother in law knew for two years that he had terminal cancer and = planned his own funeral. He was a musician and played in a local band. As a = secret from all but the wife and band, his casket was wheeled out to "When The = Saints Go Marching In" played in Dixieland-style. People who knew him were = dancing down the isle. The Prelude was a classical organ concert by a relative = (not I, we have several organists in the family). When I played for funerals in church, the funeral homes usually gave me a =   check, as it was part of the "package." Lee  
(back) Subject: Re: I wonder what Funeral Homes have pipe organs? From: "John Jarvis" <jljarvis@comcast.net> Date: Mon, 6 Dec 2004 18:50:41 -0800   There is some great information about the Quimby Pipe Organ at Rose = Hills in Whittier, CA. at this URL: http://www.quimbypipeorgans.com/skyrose.htm   Rose Hills is probably THE largest Cemetery / Multiple Mortuary complex = on the West Coast. I've been in this new chapel and heard the organ - = nice!   I used to play for lots of funerals in the 1970's as that is how I put myself through college - churches and funerals. In recent years, I have been asked to play for funerals of various older relatives at these same mortuaries only to learn that they no longer have organs of any kind. Everything is done with CD Tracks. One still has a piano for the = occasional live soloist. =20   JJ    
(back) Subject: Re: Funeral Homes From: <Justinhartz@aol.com> Date: Mon, 6 Dec 2004 22:30:03 EST   Forest Lawn Cemetary in Buffalo, New York has a wonderful Wurlitzer in its =   Crematory Chapel I had the honor of playing it for this year's OHS convention. The organ = has a new OHS Historic Organ citation. It is a gem! Check out the "Organ Handbook" for details.   Justin  
(back) Subject: Re: 25 note pedalboard From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Mon, 6 Dec 2004 22:47:21 -0500   Its just psychological I think. I also learned on an AGO pedalboard and = was terrified of everything else. Then I actually tried an old Hutchings 27- note deal, and it did feel very weird at first. But then I found that in half an hour, it didn't matter anymore. I guess a little bit depends on = the technique you've developed. If you are used to just stabbing at the = pedals out of nowhere, you'll be lost if low C is not where you are used to. If, =   as I think is the better method, use a relativistic approach where you are =   feeling your way around the keyboard, the alignment of the pedal keyboard relative to the manuals no longer matters. You can adapt from one type = and compass to another with ease.   Andy   On Mon, 06 Dec 2004 17:19:02 -0800, Liquescent wrote > Andy makes a good point we've talked about before ... those of us > who grew up with non-standard pedal-boards (I started playing the > organ at age 10; aside from lessons, I never had an AGO standard > pedal-board to play until I went to college) seem to have less > problem than those who learn exclusively on AGO boards and THEN try > to switch. It isn't logical, and I don't know why, but there it is ... > > OHS recitalists are faced with all kinds of non-standard pedal- > boards. Locally we have a one-manual Johnson that has (I think) an > 18-note pedal-board ... CC-F ... not lined up with ANYTHING ... in > form, it's sort of a cross between a spinet pedal-board and a German > baroque pedalboard ... short from back to front. > > The point has been made that if one intends to play recitals in > Europe, one is likely to find straight, flat 30-note pedalboards > (except in England); historic organs in Portugal, Spain and Italy, > of course, have only rudimentary pedals for holding long pedal- > points, etc. > > I'd really be curious as to other's experience with this ... if it's > true that learning on an AGO pedalboard makes it harder to switch to > others, why? Is it EXPOSURE to other pedalboards that makes the > difference? Or is a technique developed solely on AGO pedalboards > harder to transfer? > > I remember watching Heiller play a recital on an AGO pedalboard ... > he pedalled AS IF he was playing a straight, flat German pedalboard > ... that was very interesting to watch (grin). > > Cheers, > > Bud > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related > topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>       A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Funeral Homes From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Mon, 6 Dec 2004 22:42:38 -0600   Ah! Now if we are getting onto Crematories as well as Funeral Homes, = then the possibilities are endless. In England, particularly, many = Crematories / Crematoria tend to have rather nice pipe organs. In my = home town of Taunton, England, the Crematorium is an outstanding example = of the work of architect Sir Basil Spence -- much nicer than his highly = overrated Coventry Cathedral. It has a stunning chapel with a pipe = organ built by Geo. Osmond & Co. in 1961, with the following stoplist:   GREAT:   8' Open Diapason 8' Stopped Diapason 4' Dulcet   SWELL:   8' Lieblich Gedact 8' Salicional 8' Voix Celeste 4' Gemshorn II Rks. Mixture (12-15)   PEDAL:   16' Bourdon 8' Bass Flute (ext.)   It is a very sweet sounding instrument, though obviously without a great = deal of upperwork. But then you really don't want too much upperwork at = funerals. My father, one grandfather, both grandmothers, and numerous = other relatives were cremated to the strains of this instrument.   You will recall that Princess Margaret left instructions that her = funeral should be in Slough Crematorium rather than in Westminster = Abbey, St. Paul's Cathedral, etc. Does anyone know what they have = there?   John Speller ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Justinhartz@aol.com=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Monday, December 06, 2004 9:30 PM Subject: Re: Funeral Homes     Forest Lawn Cemetary in Buffalo, New York has a wonderful Wurlitzer in = its Crematory Chapel I had the honor of playing it for this year's OHS convention. The = organ has a new OHS Historic Organ citation. It is a gem!
(back) Subject: Re: 25 note pedalboard From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Mon, 6 Dec 2004 22:50:36 -0600     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, December 06, 2004 9:47 PM Subject: Re: 25 note pedalboard     > Its just psychological I think. I also learned on an AGO pedalboard and was > terrified of everything else. Then I actually tried an old Hutchings = 27- > note deal, and it did feel very weird at first. But then I found that = in > half an hour, it didn't matter anymore. I guess a little bit depends on the > technique you've developed. If you are used to just stabbing at the pedals > out of nowhere, you'll be lost if low C is not where you are used to. = If, > as I think is the better method, use a relativistic approach where you = are > feeling your way around the keyboard, the alignment of the pedal = keyboard > relative to the manuals no longer matters. You can adapt from one type and > compass to another with ease.   One of the organs I learnt to play on in England originally had a 25-note straight and flat pedalboard. During the time I was playing it (in September 1970 to be precise), the pedal was expanded and a new 30-note radiating and concave pedalboard was installed. There were two things = about the original 25-note pedalboard that I really disliked. First, one of my party pieces is Bach's Great A minor (BWV 543), and this ran off the top = of the pedalboard. Secondly, the original organ bench did not have a rail where one could rest one's feet when they were not actually in use, and = this was very uncomfortable. When the new pedalboard came I was overjoyed at having a new bench where I could rest my feet, and a sufficient compass to play the A minor. I don't recall that the pedals being radiating and concave rather than straight and flat made the slightest difference. Now there's something to discuss <g>   John Speller