PipeChat Digest #4977 - Tuesday, December 7, 2004
 
Re: PipeChat Digest #4969 - 12/06/04
  by <nfh417@bellsouth.net>
Re: Funeral Home Organs
  by "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
hospital organs
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
funeral makeup
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: Organs in Hospitals
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #4969 - 12/06/04 From: <nfh417@bellsouth.net> Date: Tue, 7 Dec 2004 19:40:32 -0500   Pipe Organs in Funeral Homes I own a funeal home in Cheraw,South Carolina and have a 4 rank 2 manuel = Wicks organ that we ahve used since I installed it in 1988. It is Wicks = opus 1671 and was built for St James Lutheran Church in Newton, NC in = 1937. The church used the organ up to time I moved it to my funeral home. = I person in the church left in their estate money for a larger organ as = the church had expanded several times and the old organ did not meet the = needs of a much larger room. The organ was bought in June 1937 for = 1350.00. And was paid to the good people at Wicks with 337.00 at = installation and 24 payments of 33.75 unitl paid in full. What a bargin = this was for a wonderful organ that has had NO work or renovations other = that routine maintance and tuning since 1937. To my knowledge we are the = only funeral home is SC that has a pipe organ that is used for services. Norton Funeral Home of Cheraw ,H. Craig Norton, owner www.nortonfuneralofcheraw.com > > From: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Date: 2004/12/06 Mon PM 03:23:53 EST > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Subject: PipeChat Digest #4969 - 12/06/04 > > PipeChat Digest #4969 - Monday, December 6, 2004 > > Re: Re: open toes and electromechanical action > by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> > Music Needed > by "Keith Zimmerman" <kwzimmerman@alltel.net> > Re: Joke stops (old, but still cute!) > by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> > Keyboardtrader Ad > by "Keith Zimmerman" <kwzimmerman@alltel.net> > Re: Music Needed > by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> > Re: Rodgers 945 > by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> > Re: (nomenclature) > by <OMusic@aol.com> > Re: Keyboardtrader Ad > by "Malcolm Wechsler \(Mander Organs\)" = <manderusa@earthlink.net> > Re: Rodgers 945 > by <OrganMD@aol.com> > Leopold Stokowski, Organist -- Rollin Smith's New Book > by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> > Re: Rodgers 945 > by "noel jones" <gedeckt@usit.net> > Adeste Fideles with drugs > by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> > I wonder what Funeral Homes have pipe organs? > by "Jerry Richer" <jerry@ChirpingBat.Com> > Re: I wonder what Funeral Homes have pipe organs? > by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> > Funeral home pipe organs > by <MH1M@aol.com> > Re: I wonder what Funeral Homes have pipe organs? > by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> > Kitchen Sink > by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> > RE: I wonder what Funeral Homes have pipe organs? > by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> > Re: Diaphonic pipes > by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> > Cypres Et Lauriers From C. Saint-Saens > by "Joel Armengaud" <joeout@apsydev.com> > Re: Music Needed > by <RonSeverin@aol.com> > > > ---------------------------------------------------------------------- > > Subject: Re: Re: open toes and electromechanical action > From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> > Date: Mon, 6 Dec 2004 21:15:02 +0800 > > Well Thomas, I can only speak as I find. A large proportion of church = organs > in this region are extension instruments and they have derived = mutations. I > play one of them each Sunday; I have played many more by the same = builder. I > can use the Gedecht 8 with Nazard 2 and 2/3 for a solo sound similar to = a > Clarinet or a Gamba 8 with the Nazard for a nasal sound not unlike an = Orch > Oboe. Again a useful solo combination. A derived 12th on the Great is > overscaled but can be used with discretion with full organ. It adds a = reedy > clang to the tutti. > In no way could you describe any of these sounds as unpleasant. There is = no > unpleasant "clash" nor are there noticeable overtone clashes. Maybe you = have > been unlucky.Theatre organs can be played straight and most sound very = good > indeed. A number of church have bought them from closed theatres and = they > give very good service. > Bob Elms. > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "Thomas Dressler" <rgtd@ptdprolog.net> > To: <PIPORG-L@listserv.albany.edu>; "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> > Sent: Monday, December 06, 2004 1:50 PM > Subject: Re: Re: open toes and electromechanical action > > > >I can only speak about what I've experienced. > > > > I won't say anything is impossible. > > > > I'll ignore the fact that I've never heard borrowed stops that > > sound like they have the right scaling. Perhaps it's possible. > > I guess I can't say when it comes to theater organs. I don't > > deny their artistic qualities, but I am not an afficionado, so > > I can't speak of their design. But I will say that I believe > > the aims of theater organs and. . .what. . .classical (?) organs > > is different. The design of a plenum is, I think, different from > > the design of a theater organ, and has different aims. > > > > But all that aside, I cannot think of a way around the > > tuning problems of derived mutations. They sound bad enough > > when you try to use a derived 2 2/3 Nazard in a cornet, which > > is being played one note at a time. But a derived 2 2/3 Quint > > for a plenum is just impossible. The clashes at the given pitch > > are bad enough, but the overtone clashes you get are so bad > > you might as well be playing tone clusters if your ears are > > sensitive to high pitches. > > > > Thomas Dressler > >> > > > ---------------------------------------------------------------------- > > Subject: Music Needed > From: "Keith Zimmerman" <kwzimmerman@alltel.net> > Date: Mon, 6 Dec 2004 08:49:15 -0500 > > Listers, > > Does anybody have a copy of Schirmer's organ accompaniment to = "Hallelujah" from "Messiah" that they wouldn't mind breaking the law and = faxing to me? > > Once again, I've said "yes" when I probably should've said "no". A = friend has asked me to play the organ for his church's Christmas program = this coming Saturday and Sunday. Around here, they're all contemporary = style programs. When I was the regular organist for our church, I would = generally play the choral parts for our contemporary songs on the organ = while the pianist played the accompaniment. > > I received the music about a week ago, and these choral parts don't lend = themselves well to the organ. Regarding Hallelujah, I "thought" that I = would be playing the piano accompaniment. He told me last night that he = wanted me to play the choral parts on the organ while the pianist played = the accomp. > > I haven't played an organ in 2 years, so I don't have time to really try = to condense the choral parts into a score that I can play on the organ - = organist is not my day job, BTW. I remember that the piano accompaniment = does try to include the entrances of the individual parts, so I'm assuming = that the organ score might as well. > > I would appreciate your help. > > Hope y'all are beginning to have a Merry Christmas > > Keith > ---------------------------------------------------------------------- > > Subject: Re: Joke stops (old, but still cute!) > From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> > Date: Mon, 6 Dec 2004 07:51:31 -0600 (Central Standard Time) > > Alan Freed wrote: > > -------Original Message------- > > > The best ones involve the trap door in the pulpit floor. Tough > > mechanics there, too; yet . . . . . > > We always dubbed that stop "Parson Unison Release!" > > One of our favorite practical joke stops (on an instrument where the = stop > designations could be readily exchanged, that is!) was the one time we > received a Purchase Order from a University (which shall remain = nameless!) > and either the spell-checker or the trashy-blonde secretary messed-up = and it > read "Chimps" instead of chimes for an addition. > > So, dutifully, we had the stop designation engraved CHIMPS and put it in > without calling anyone's attention to it. > > It was MONTHS before anyone got wise to it and when they did, the = college > professor called up and it was all he could do to compose himself from > breaking into howls of laughter at the thought of this. > > I then told him where the real designation was and how to go about = changing > it. > > Every once in awhile, whenever things get dull, they'll pull that out = for > the benefit of those who never have been "tested"! > > On another occasion, we rigged-up a "Bovine" stop for a > farmer-turned-organist, which consisted of a cow bell with a > zimbelstern-type shaker and a crank which activated a small wedge-shaped > bellows which fed wind into a very low-pitched discarded Vox Humana = pipe. It > "mooed" rather convincingly! > > We did joke about (but never implemented) a "Bourbon to Organist" stop = for > an Episcopal church organ console (which was replete with many other > amenities) for which a small sliding door would open and a shot glass = would > be strategically placed on the other side! > > Would have been tempting, though. > > Perhaps a variant on that theme which would have a more practical > application would be a "Communion to organist" compartment for use on = the > console of a church where the Communion distribution takes place in the = pews > rather than communicants "parading" to the front. It could keep the > elements out of harm's way until the appropriate time. > > Faithfully, > > Rich > > ---------------------------------------------------------------------- > > Subject: Keyboardtrader Ad > From: "Keith Zimmerman" <kwzimmerman@alltel.net> > Date: Mon, 6 Dec 2004 08:57:33 -0500 > > Listers, > > Has anyone checked out the Keyboardtrader ad #9273 dated 12/04/04 to see = if it's "for real"? > > Apparently there are some Nigerian churches that want 'Durable New = Inexpensive' pipe organs. > > Keith > ---------------------------------------------------------------------- > > Subject: Re: Music Needed > From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> > Date: Mon, 6 Dec 2004 08:01:16 -0600 > > Hello, Keith: > > Here is a quick way to get the vocal parts. Find > a copy of the old Broadman Hymnal. Hallelujah is > published in that book in four-part harmony. > > F. Richard Burt > > > . > ---------------------------------------------------------------------- > > Subject: Re: Rodgers 945 > From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> > Date: Mon, 6 Dec 2004 09:43:51 -0800 > > >Hi Gang .............. > > > >I have a former client that is the owner of a Rodgers model 945 > >three manual digital electronic organ. Aging and the need to > >downsize her life requires the sale of this instrument. This organ > >has spent its entire life in a residential installation. Please > >send me a private reply if you have interest in this instrument. > > > >Bill > > Hi Bill.. > please - WHERE? > > John V > > ---------------------------------------------------------------------- > > Subject: Re: (nomenclature) > From: <OMusic@aol.com> > Date: Mon, 6 Dec 2004 10:04:35 EST > > There was one of those "scream machines" at a funeral home where I = played > while in college. I could use only the softest of stops or it would = blow > everyone out the door. It had been donated to them. The home was sold, = and I don't > know what happened to the organ. Lee > > ---------------------------------------------------------------------- > > Subject: Re: Keyboardtrader Ad > From: "Malcolm Wechsler \(Mander Organs\)" <manderusa@earthlink.net> > Date: Mon, 6 Dec 2004 10:20:40 -0500 > > Well, Keith, if it is anything like the letters we get quite regularly = from > Nigeria, there is possibly some scam involved. The important thing to > remember is that, if in the course of any transaction, you are asked for > information about your bank account(s) for assurance, stay far away. > > Not unconnected to this, there are, in Nigeria, nine smallish Mander = tracker > Organs of a certain age, built by Noel Mander. A Nigerian man with an > interest in Organbuilding, came to London and worked at the shop as = these > Organs were being built, and was then able to return home to service the > instruments. As far as I know, this arrangement still pertains, but it = has > been a long time. I don't know how this all came about. > > Cheers, > > Malcolm Wechsler > www.mander-organs.com > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: Keith Zimmerman > To: pipechat@pipechat.org > Sent: Monday, December 06, 2004 8:57 AM > Subject: Keyboardtrader Ad > > > Listers, > > Has anyone checked out the Keyboardtrader ad #9273 dated 12/04/04 to see = if > it's "for real"? > > Apparently there are some Nigerian churches that want 'Durable New > Inexpensive' pipe organs. > > Keith > > > > ---------------------------------------------------------------------- > > Subject: Re: Rodgers 945 > From: <OrganMD@aol.com> > Date: Mon, 6 Dec 2004 10:37:03 EST > > Utah > > ---------------------------------------------------------------------- > > Subject: Leopold Stokowski, Organist -- Rollin Smith's New Book > From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> > Date: Mon, 6 Dec 2004 10:31:13 -0500 > > Rollin Smith has written a book about the famous conductor Leopold = Stokowski > as organist, "Stokowski and the Organ." It is available at > http://www.ohscatalog.org, with a special price for OHS members > > Stokowski began his career in England as an organist and choirmaster. = This > first major study of Stokowski's early years covers his education at the > Royal College of Music, his church posts in London, and his three years > employed as director of music at St. Bartholomew's Episcopal Church in = New > York City. The book examines the programs of his organ recitals (played = on > the third largest organ in America at the time), a list of his = repertoire, > facsimiles of his original choral works, an analysis of his Aeolian = player > organ roll of Bach's Passacaglia, and a detailed study of his famous > orchestral transcriptions of Bach's organ works. > > > ---------------------------------------------------------------------- > > Subject: Re: Rodgers 945 > From: "noel jones" <gedeckt@usit.net> > Date: Mon, 06 Dec 2004 11:06:13 -0500 > > I have a friend, who is 70, who flew to Idaho from Tennessee, looked at > a 945 in a home, bought it rented a truck, drove back in winter (got > stuck two days in a town without a bookstore when a blizzard closed the > highways) and got it home. Converted his garage into an organ room and > loves the organ... > > I'd recommend this organ highly. > > OrganMD@aol.com wrote: > > > Utah > > > -- > noel jones, aago > noeljones@frogmusic.com > ----------------------------------- > 1 877 249-5251 > Athens, TN USA > > www.frogmusic.com > Rodgers Organ Users Group > Frog Music Press - Organ and MIDI Music > FMP Organ Music Search Service > Rodgers Organ Design & Voicing Services > > > ---------------------------------------------------------------------- > > Subject: Adeste Fideles with drugs > From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> > Date: Mon, 06 Dec 2004 11:06:41 -0500 > > This appeared in the Lancaster PA newspaper yesterday: > > William Everett, a Congressman from Massachusetts, told the story of = a > congregation that needed hymnbooks but lacked the necessary funds to > purchase them. The congregation heard of a large company in their area = that > made patent medicines and was willing to provide the church with hymnals = at > the astonishing price of only one penny per hymnal. The one condition = was > that each book would carry some advertising. > > The people felt that this was a great solution to their problem, so = they > ordered the new hymnals. The books arrived the day before Christmas and > were unpacked and readied for use. On Christmas morning the pastor > announced that they would sing hymn number 138, "Hark! the Herald Angels > Sing." the pastor and people turned to the hymns and in a few seconds = were > astonished to find themselves singing: > > Hark! the herald angels sing > Beecham's pills are just the thing; > Peace on earth and mercy mild, > Two for man, and one for child. > > > > Hmmm. :-) > > Karl E. Moyer > Lancaster PA > > > ---------------------------------------------------------------------- > > Subject: I wonder what Funeral Homes have pipe organs? > From: "Jerry Richer" <jerry@ChirpingBat.Com> > Date: Mon, 6 Dec 2004 11:14:51 -0500 > > Have you ever seen a pipe organ in a Funeral Home? Can you = describe > it? I know they exist. I've never seen one. I'm curious I guess = because I > grew up in a > Funeral Home and never heard of a pipe organ in one. > > Jerry > Chirp|Chirp|Chirp: It's the Bat, Bat Arhonious Software, = www.chirpingbat.com > > > ---------------------------------------------------------------------- > > Subject: Re: I wonder what Funeral Homes have pipe organs? > From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> > Date: Mon, 06 Dec 2004 11:22:44 -0500 > > > Have you ever seen a pipe organ in a Funeral Home? Can you = describe > > it? I know they exist. I've never seen one. I'm curious I guess = because I > > grew up in a Funeral Home and never heard of a pipe organ in one. > > The old-time Arnold Funeral Home in Lebanon PA (later Taylor Funeral = Home > and still later Taylor-Ruffner Funeral Home) had a small (perhaps 3 - 6 > ranks) M=F6ller with a player attachment. It was finally removed = perhaps 20 > years ago or so, and I understand that the player machine was thrown = down a > town dump somewhere that had once been an on--pit stone quarry because = it > seemed to have little value otherwise to the owners. > > Karl E. Moyer > Lancaster PA > > > ---------------------------------------------------------------------- > > Subject: Funeral home pipe organs > From: <MH1M@aol.com> > Date: Mon, 6 Dec 2004 11:44:09 EST > > SELL-HERRON FUNERAL HOME, 610-433-5630. 1145 LEHIGH ST ALLENTOWN, PA = 18103 > has a Moller pipe organ. > > There is a pipe organ in a funeral home on 5th Street, between = Washington St. > and Walnut St., Reading, PA 19601. > > ---------------------------------------------------------------------- > > Subject: Re: I wonder what Funeral Homes have pipe organs? > From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> > Date: Mon, 6 Dec 2004 10:47:35 -0600 > > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "Jerry Richer" <jerry@ChirpingBat.Com> > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Monday, December 06, 2004 10:14 AM > Subject: I wonder what Funeral Homes have pipe organs? > > > > Have you ever seen a pipe organ in a Funeral Home? Can you = describe > > it? I know they exist. I've never seen one. I'm curious I guess = because > I > > grew up in a > > Funeral Home and never heard of a pipe organ in one. > > Not long ago St. Stephen's Episcopal Church in St. Louis bought the pipe > organ from a funeral home in the Carondelet district of St. Louis that = had > closed. It is a typical little three-rank Kilgen unit organ. Diapason, > Gedeckt and Salicional extended over two manuals and pedals. > > John Speller > > > > ---------------------------------------------------------------------- > > Subject: Kitchen Sink > From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> > Date: Mon, 6 Dec 2004 10:48:06 -0600 > > I prefer the raspy reed version of the Kitchen Sink........as a 16' = stop. > Traditional English nomenclature is Rusty Sink 16'. Should you wish a = more > "continental influence," it can be called Zink de Oxidius Ferrous 16'. > > In full-capped model, it would be properly labeled Stopped Sink = Odiferous > 16'. > Dennis Steckley > Lover of Cats, Pipe Organs & 1940-65 Sewing Machines > > > ---------------------------------------------------------------------- > > Subject: RE: I wonder what Funeral Homes have pipe organs? > From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> > Date: Tue, 7 Dec 2004 06:18:28 +1300 > > > > Have you ever seen a pipe organ in a Funeral Home? Can you = describe > > it? I know they exist. I've never seen one. I'm curious I guess = because > I > > grew up in a > > Funeral Home and never heard of a pipe organ in one. > > Yes, there are two in NZ. One uses a former Methodist church that = already > had an organ in it. The other is in a former Presbyterian church. > > Ross > > > ---------------------------------------------------------------------- > > Subject: Re: Diaphonic pipes > From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> > Date: Mon, 6 Dec 2004 12:16:27 -0500 > > > I have heard experimental pipes, down into the 64' octave, in which > > a pulse generator activated an electromagnet that in turn activated > > a standard pneumatic pouch. A full-length resonator was not > > necessary, for some reason. The sound was almost instantaneous, > > quite thunderous, smooth, and full, and was "tunable" by a rheostat > > that varied the frequency of the pulse generator. If fully developed, > > this would be a good solution to winded 32' stops. nation at 8'. > > Sebastian M. Gluck > > > Interesting. I think this is precisely how car horns work. I've often > wondered if car horn technology, with the right resonator, could be used = to > make windless, but accoustic, reed stops. Well, there's no pneumatics = and > probably no pulse generator either on a car horn. But the point is, > something vibrates electrically without wind, and the resonator (usually > coiled up on a car horn) shapes and amplifies the sound. And its = tunable > with a knob. > > Andy > > > A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service > PO Box 111 > Burlington, VT 05402 > (802)578-3936 > Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com > > > ---------------------------------------------------------------------- > > Subject: Cypres Et Lauriers From C. Saint-Saens > From: "Joel Armengaud" <joeout@apsydev.com> > Date: Mon, 6 Dec 2004 18:21:19 +0100 > > I have difficulties finding an online sheet-music store that has Camille = Saint-Saens' Cypres et Lauriers (Op 156) available (so far only "out of = print" availability...) > Could someone help me? > Thanks, > > -Joel Armengaud > ---------------------------------------------------------------------- > > Subject: Re: Music Needed > From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> > Date: Mon, 6 Dec 2004 13:49:16 EST > > Dear Kieth: > > There is a two volume set called Handel made practical.. It's in the > Lorenz collections. The accompaniment is logical and not all > over the place. I wouldn't leave home without it. Look up the > volume it's in. > > Ron Severin > > ---------------------------------------------------------------------- > End of PipeChat Digest > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >    
(back) Subject: Re: Funeral Home Organs From: "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Tue, 7 Dec 2004 19:56:14 -0500     Just to add a little info to the mix:   I know of about 18 funeral home organs in Central Pennsylvania, in regular use and properly maintained.   Most are three to six ranks. Several early Moller artistes; Wix magic 2's and 3's; Kilgen Petite and Harmonic Ensembles; Tellers Kent Pandeans; even a pair of Estey Tubulars.   As far as I know they are all rather nice examples of their genre. We maintain several, I know people who maintain the rest.   There are two very interesting Mollers. I suppose you could call them floor models. The chests have solid bottoms, and rest directly on the floor. The chest magnets are on top of the chest with very tiny armature springs, and the top boards are removable. Of course, they are unit chests.   People are just dying to hear them.     Jim                         Some mornings it just doesn't seem worth it to gnaw through the leather straps.  
(back) Subject: hospital organs From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Tue, 7 Dec 2004 19:59:09 -0600   Right after I moved to the Louisville area about ten years ago I read in = the paper about two small pipe organs being auctioned at a hospital facility that was being closed.......this was probably in Louisville or maybe Indianapolis. I don't know why, but Austin sticks in my mind as the builder, and that may be 100% wrong......or perhaps it was Pilcher. Dennis Steckley Lover of Cats, Pipe Organs & 1940-65 Sewing Machines    
(back) Subject: funeral makeup From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Tue, 7 Dec 2004 20:04:49 -0600   Monty--you are absolutely right on the body makeup folk. I am fortunate = in that in one ministry, the funeral home I dealt with the most was owned by = a man who taught the cosmetology course at the local mortuary college.   And where I am now, the director I work with the most is known throughout the area for his fine work in that department. I've noticed that when he does a service outside the funeral home, he always brings a kit with him = to adjust for the lighting. Our church lighting makes a corpse look like "death warmed over"! Duh! But with a few deft strokes of a makeup brush, the body comes to life, so to speak!   Dennis Steckley Lover of Cats, Pipe Organs & 1940-65 Sewing Machines    
(back) Subject: Re: Organs in Hospitals From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 07 Dec 2004 20:08:58 -0600   Hmmm....organs in hospitals...here's a unique case I bet --   The University of Arkansas Medical Center (UAMS), here in Little Rock, owned what I believe was the last functional "theatre organ" extant in = this state. The 3m (+/- 10 rk?) instrument was located in a = couple-hundred-seat auditorium in a 60's vintage portion of the hospital complex, and was a gift to the hospital from Dr. James Dennis, who loved theatre organ music and is (I believe) a past Chancellor of the hospital. The organ was a bit =   of a mongrel itself, but enjoyed good placement in the room, and could = make lots of happy music by all accounts. (I never actually heard it, but have =   no doubt that Dr. Dennis spent a pile of his own money to make it the best =   that he could possibly manage!!)   Alas, the construction quality of this structure was not terribly good. = By the mid 1990's, this fact combined with the continued growth of the hospital dictated that the little auditorium had to go. (currently, the main entrance to the hospital complex occupies the same ground) The organ =   was removed to storage, where it remained in official state-owned "limbo" for a number of years, before ultimately being (apparently?) sorta sold = off to the highest bidder in an uninformed and unofficial auction... (or whatever happens to interesting surplus things like organs that are unfortunate enough to belong to a government agency, that is.....)   Well, I said it was a unique case...I didn't say it was a terribly = *happy* one... :-(   --Tim