PipeChat Digest #4979 - Wednesday, December 8, 2004
 
RE: funeral homes
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
Re: Meeting Interesting people
  by "Octaaf" <octaaf@charter.net>
Re: Weird request
  by "Jerry Richer" <jerry@ChirpingBat.Com>
Re:      Name that tune?
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
RE: NIGHT OF MIRACLES [xposted]
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Name that tune?
  by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: Go Tell It on the Mountain
  by "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net>
RE: Organs in hospitals
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
RE: Wicks Funeral Organ
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
Re: Meeting Interesting people
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: Meeting Intresting People
  by "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com>
Re: Organs in hospitals
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
Re: Organs in hospitals
  by "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Meeting Interesting people
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Meeting Interesting people
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: NIGHT OF MIRACLES [xposted]
  by <OMusic@aol.com>
Re: funeral homes
  by <OMusic@aol.com>
Re: Go Tell It on the Mountain
  by "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net>
Re: Meeting Interesting people
  by <OMusic@aol.com>
RE: NIGHT OF MIRACLES [xposted]
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
 

(back) Subject: RE: funeral homes From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Wed, 8 Dec 2004 10:06:38 -0000   I don't know how "viewing" is distributed in the UK. When both my father = and mother passed on, I was asked if there would be viewing required. I said = NO quite emphatically, but it shows that some people must require it. In my view it is best to remember the departed in their moment of joyous life, = not in some artificially prepared illusion after death. There is only one = person who can restore us after death, and he most definitely isn't working in = the prep room of some funeral home!   =20   All this reminds me of an old English story.=20   Fred was laid out for viewing in his coffin and the relatives were = gathered.   "Ee, don't 'ee look well!"   "Yes, that week in Scarborough did him the world of good!"   =20   Will Light Coventry UK   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of = Alan Freed Sent: 08 December 2004 00:01 To: PipeChat Subject: Re: funeral homes   =20   On 12/7/04 3:26 PM, "RMB10@aol.com" <RMB10@aol.com> wrote:   > Some people have it, and some people don't.   Monty: Thank you. Important words, well spoken. We need to hear ALL = that.     Is there a decline in "viewing"? (It's not been a particular thing in = any of my parishes-we're Scandinavian Lutheran, tee hee.) =20   Day after Thanksgiving, the house adjoining mine burned (quite = completely). Father was at work; mother is still (mostly) comatose in a major "burn unit," both children (2 and 10) were burned to death. Funeral was this = past Thursday (and a fine one it was, in the local RC parish church-pathetic music, but superb preaching). I had called the (Hispanic) large = funeral home (Ortiz, a major chain here) to ask about the schedule. The woman = kept HAMMERING about "the viewing" from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. I repeated several times that I was calling NOT about "the viewing" but about "the funeral mass"; she just couldn't understand that. It sounded like she was = SELLING the restorative arts, even though, in this case, they would NOT be on display at ALL! =20   I was pretty sure that there would be NO "viewing," under the = circumstances, no matter how much she insisted on it; and people who DID go to "that" confirmed that there was none. Of course; it would verge on the = impossible.     Now, of course there's an ethnic complication there; but would I be = right to think that "viewings" are becoming less important? Or is it pretty much = a regional/cultural thing?   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Meeting Interesting people From: "Octaaf" <octaaf@charter.net> Date: Wed, 8 Dec 2004 05:07:18 -0600   Desiree Hines asked: "Why do some organists offer such razor-sharp cuts = at those who might take their places someday?"   Desiree,   Don't you know? This is a prerequisite for AGO membership. Just kidding = Listers!!! Please don't flame me.   Seriously Desiree, this is a very good question. One to which I can = relate, having experienced similar attitudes in my youth and many times = as a person of mature years. I've never found a satisfactory answer. = That said, I hope that you and your new friend will give us "old timers" = the benefit of the doubt. Most of us are really warm and welcoming = people, as are most of the members of this List. Of course there are = exceptions, but why waste precious time and energy trying to understand = or cope with them? Life is way too short.   We were all young, enthusiastic, inexperienced musicians once upon a = time. Why some tend to forget that is beyond me. Your generation and = those that will follow are the future of the art.   Cheers,   Tim Grenz
(back) Subject: Re: Weird request From: "Jerry Richer" <jerry@ChirpingBat.Com> Date: Wed, 8 Dec 2004 06:12:55 -0500   Can I try? Was it "handbell"? Chirp|Chirp|Chirp: It's the Bat, Bat Arhonious Software, = www.chirpingbat.com
(back) Subject: Re: Name that tune? From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Wed, 8 Dec 2004 21:22:43 +0800   It is The Ashgrove and it is set as a hymn tune (Together in Song Number = 531 "Sent forth by God's Blessing") Bob Elms ----- Original Message ----- From: "James H. H. Lampert" <jamesl@hb.quik.com> To: <PIPORG-L@listserv.albany.edu> Sent: Wednesday, December 08, 2004 11:56 AM Subject: Name that tune?     > LGMM: > > Can anybody put a name (and a source for a complete score) to the tune > that begins with the fragment to be found at > http://www.hb.quik.com/jamesl/test1.mid > ??? > > -- > James H. H. Lampert > Professional Dilettante > http://www.hb.quik.com/jamesl > http://members.hostedscripts.com/antispam.html > http://www.thehungersite.com > > Help America's Passenger Trains. http://www.saveamtrak.org > > Read My Lips: No More Atrocities! > > :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: > Note: opinions expressed on PIPORG-L are those of the individual con- > tributors and not necessarily those of the list owners nor of the Uni- > versity at Albany. For a brief summary of list commands, send mail to > listserv@listserv.albany.edu saying GET LSVCMMDS.TXT or see the web > page at http://www.albany.edu/piporg-l/lsvcmmds.html . > :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: =      
(back) Subject: RE: NIGHT OF MIRACLES [xposted] From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 9 Dec 2004 02:37:06 +1300   >NIGHT OF MIRACLES A Christmas Cantata by John W. Peterson   Hey, I sang in this about 17 years ago. We made a cassette tape of it so that's fun to have.   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: Name that tune? From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Wed, 8 Dec 2004 07:45:50 -0600   Good Morning:   This tune is also set with the text:   "The Master hath come." David Lowe has a fine organ arrangement published by LifeWay. It is in a collection of his works called: "Come, Christians, Join to Sing."   F. Richard Burt   ..     > It is The Ashgrove and it is set as a hymn tune (Together in Song Number 531 > "Sent forth by God's Blessing") > Bob Elms   > > Can anybody put a name (and a source for a complete score) to the tune > > that begins with the fragment to be found at > > http://www.hb.quik.com/jamesl/test1.mid > > ???      
(back) Subject: Re: Go Tell It on the Mountain From: "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> Date: Wed, 08 Dec 2004 07:47:33 -0600   I have one by someone named Keck that is very cute. It has a sort of samba rhythm throughout. It is in a collection of hymn-tuned based music - I can picture the cover, but can't think of the name. It has a pink cover... If no one else comes up with it, I will look it up. I used it at a Christmas concert last week.   Margarete Thomsen wrote: > Can anyone recommend organ settings of this tune? > > MARGARETE THOMSEN > Director of Music Ministries/Liturgist > Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (ELCA) > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >     -- Dr. Margo Dillard Organist, FUMC, Lewisville, TX Musical Feast Choral Society Dillard Piano & Organ Studio    
(back) Subject: RE: Organs in hospitals From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Wed, 8 Dec 2004 08:37:44 -0600   =20   There is a wonderful 4 rank, single manual, Charles W. McManis tracker instrument in the chapel of the Independence Regional Health Center in Independence, Missouri. The disposition is 8' Bordun, 4' Prinzipal, 4' Flauto, 2' Prinzipal. The console has identical drawknobs for all four ranks on either side of the keydesk which is divided at middle "C" which makes for many possibilities.   =20   Dale G. Rider   Independence, MO   =20   =20   =20   I think that the inclusion of divided manual stops in small, one-manual organs is invaluable. Assuming careful scaling and balance, any of the higher pitched stops could be used in the two bass octaves for an accompaniment to a solo combination in the treble. Or the 2' prinzipal in the bass could serve as an "echo" to a fuller combination in the treble.   =20   As an architecture student, I once had an instructor who taught us that limitations spawn creativity. Instead of letting us "go to town" with the blank page, he put stringent requirements and limitations on our design projects. As a result, the work produced that semester was far richer, and much more thoughtful, than work by the same class in previous semesters.   =20   I think it's much the same with organs like this one. Sure, you don't have unlimited tonal possibilities, but a good measure of creativity and knowledge could produce stunning results.   =20   Thanks for sharing the specification, Dale.   =20   Daniel Hancock   Springfield, Missouri=20   =20   =20  
(back) Subject: RE: Wicks Funeral Organ From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Wed, 8 Dec 2004 08:46:28 -0600     On Tue, 7 Dec 2004 19:40:32 -0500, nfh417 wrote > Pipe Organs in Funeral Homes > I own a funeal home in Cheraw,South Carolina and have a 4 rank 2=20 > manuel Wicks organ that we ahve used since I installed it in 1988.=20 > It is Wicks opus 1671 and was built for St James Lutheran Church in=20 > Newton, NC in 1937. The church used the organ up to time I moved it=20 > to my funeral home. I person in the church left in their estate=20 > money for a larger organ as the church had expanded several times=20 > and the old organ did not meet the needs of a much larger room. The=20 > organ was bought in June 1937 for 1350.00. And was paid to the good=20 > people at Wicks with 337.00 at installation and 24 payments of 33.75=20 > unitl paid in full. What a bargin this was for a wonderful organ=20 > that has had NO work or renovations other that routine maintance and=20 > tuning since 1937. To my knowledge we are the only funeral home is=20 > SC that has a pipe organ that is used for services. Norton Funeral=20 > Home of Cheraw ,H. Craig Norton, owner www.nortonfuneralofcheraw.com > >=20   What are the specifications and resources of this organ?   Daniel Hancock Springfield, Missouri  
(back) Subject: Re: Meeting Interesting people From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 8 Dec 2004 07:22:57 -0800 (PST)       Octaaf <octaaf@charter.net> wrote: We were all young, enthusiastic, inexperienced musicians once upon a time. = Why some tend to forget that is beyond me. Your generation and those that = will follow are the future of the art. Tim...thats the statement of the millinium! (sp?) When he and I were = talking, that was the flow of the conversation. Some people forget that = they too were once in the same Organ shoes that us young people are in. = You mentioned that there are many people that are indeed warm-hearted. = This is true. It is possible that some of them, however, don' think before = they make comments. They don't think "oh my, I remember...I was once = unable to play Durufle's Suite...but now I can, and maybe someday you will = too. Here's some tips on learning it...." Jacob, the guy from the library, = mentioned that once, someone told him something in a cold way regarding = the Dupre B Major. He mentioned later, that person retracted what they = said and indeed remembered he was in the same place about 12 years ago. Early in my interest in the organ, I heard (THEE) Mark Miller in concert. = It was amazing! He made a comment on how he heard Virgil play the Bach D = major once. He said he went to try to play it and was quickly humbled! His = point was that we all start somewhere, and have to grow into the Virgils, = Claire's, Nita's, Fernando's, Catherine's, etc. Maybe some people in the = profession honestly just don't like to admit that once upon a = console...they sucked! Off to get ready for a musical weekend. TDH     --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - Find what you need with new enhanced search. Learn more.
(back) Subject: Re: Meeting Intresting People From: "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com> Date: Wed, 8 Dec 2004 11:00:11 -0500   From Desiree: "He's in the same age group as some of us younger listers here. He mentioned he is able to play some fairly substantial pieces. When =   asked why he does not pursue the field, he gave an answer that was not unfamiliar. 'Too many organists have hurt my feelings.' He mentioned that, =   while there are those organists who have pleasing personalities, he continues, mostly, to find the opposite."   I wonder if it's true that organists are harder on each other than any = other musicians, or than other artists in general. If so, I have a theory that = it relates to the emotional intensity a lot of us feel for our work combined with lack of interest and respect for our profession on the part of the general public. Hasn't it been demonstrated time and time again that = members of an "oppressed" group can unaccountably tend to act badly toward each other, perhaps as a misguided outlet for the frustration they feel?   Since taking up organ playing again with the insights that come with midlife, I've realized there are very few things I could possibly do that give me as much sense of self-esteem and satisfaction. And I feel this way =   even though my abilities and education are pretty modest compared to many others! But I also have had to come to grips with the response I get from people outside the profession when I tell them what I do: generally it's = an eyes-glazed-over, "oh, that's nice" reaction of utter disinterest. Sort of =   "why would anyone bother with that" kind of thing. I've realized this disconnect does trouble me a little, and in a way that a similar reaction = to my previous lines of work (including historic preservation, a fairly = worthy endeavor in itself) did not.      
(back) Subject: Re: Organs in hospitals From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Wed, 08 Dec 2004 11:07:35 -0500   Pennsylvania created a number of mental hospitals in the 19th century complete with chapels and equipped at least many of them with pipe organs. Most of these old buildings are now gone, and the organs often got moved elsewhere. Millersville U. in a suburb of Lancaster PA, from whence I am retired, got the 1881 Hook & Hastings from the chapel of the state mental hospital at Warren PA, not terribly far from Erie, and the back of the = swell box still has the shipping directions and each railroad junction point = where the organ was shifted from one railroad company to another until its delivery point. Ours is GREAT: principals 8, 4 2 2/3 & 2; flutes 8 & 4; Dulciana SWELL: flutes 8 & 4; strings 8 & 4; Oboe (two stops divided at t.c.) PED: flutes 16 & 8.   James McFarland moved it to Millersville and re-erected it almost exactly as he found it at Warren and with no tonal changes. So we have = an authentic 1881 H & H at Millersville. I think Jim could likely tell us where the organs from Danville State Hospital and Wernersville State Hospital have gone. Jim, are you here?   While limited in size, the organ nevertheless served as my vehicle for several full faculty recitals, and it appears on the OHS 1976 convention = LP.   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA  
(back) Subject: Re: Organs in hospitals From: "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 8 Dec 2004 17:45:20 +0100 (CET)   Karl's posting reminds me of the Nordland Psychiatric Hospital in R=F8nvik, Bod=F8, Northern Norway. The chapel has a fine little Gr=F6nlund, one of his earliest instruments dating from the late 70's. The Gr=F6nlund replaced another pipe organ, the details of which I don't know.   My great-grandfather was a nurse there before WW2, and used to pump the bellows on Sundays. Curiously, one of my other great-grandfathers also had this job, providing air for a lovely little Walcker which fortunately is preserved in Soma Mortuary, Sandnes.   - Jarle http://jarle.moo.no   --- Karl Moyer <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> wrote: > Pennsylvania created a number of mental > hospitals in the 19th century > complete with chapels and equipped at least many of > them with pipe organs.    
(back) Subject: Re: Meeting Interesting people From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Wed, 8 Dec 2004 11:55:17 EST   Hi Desiree: I had a similar experience with a prominent well known organ professor. He even went so far as to take pot shots at my mother, my parentage and my station in life. He couldn't teach worth a damned but he had the requisite PhD. My attitude was, You miserable SOB, I'm going to learn to play music on the organ with or without you. I did too. You have to develop a thick skin and just keep on going. I found another teacher, a woman, Masters degree in organ performance. She was kind, wonderful and very helpful. I acheived my goal through her encouragement, and her expertise in teaching. To her I owe everything, to the jerk I owe nothing. Her students knocked to socks off of some of the best known and placeed PhD's in the business in competition. She never ever said an insulting or hurtful thing to any of her students. We loved her too. She's still holding forth in a Lutheran University nearing 80 years old. Her name? Esther Jones God bless her! Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Re: Meeting Interesting people From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 8 Dec 2004 09:16:34 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   In my youth, every student was treated with utter contempt and beaten with sticks.   In cathedrals, before daring to utter a word, even God would always allow the organist to finish his voluntary first!   I can never remember a single word of encouragement from either my peers or my elders when it came to organ-playing. The "establishment" were conceited, aloof and arrogant to a degree.   One cathedral organist, of considerable fame in his day, raged at the Dean who dared to wander, uninvited, up to the organ loft on the choir-screen. The poor Dean never went there again.   I have never quite fathomed the reasons for this insurmountable barrier, but perhaps it was connected with the fact that in my youth, the best organists were very much la creme-de-la-creme of academia, often had private educations in quite savage and abusive schools, had served in the military and were, by their nature, extremely intellectual.   Thr trick was always to get them drunk, whereupon confessions flowed and emotions poured.   Being a part of the pack was never a part my personal agenda, and still isn't to this day....I prefer the company of ordinary folk who wield hammers.   I've always been very friendly to ANYONE who expresses an interest in the organ, and it was rather nice when a student of about 25, who is exceptional academically and heading for a fine Doctorate qualification, said to me, "I think I would have given up but for you. You were the one who actually took an interest and encouraged me."   Well, it's nice to know that I was probably responsible for ruining at least one life!   It says something, that in the unlikely event that I was ever emotionally distraught, suicidal, lonely, bankrupt, ill, bereft of hope or just bored, the LAST people I would approach would be clergymen and organists!!!!!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK               __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - 250MB free storage. Do more. Manage less. http://info.mail.yahoo.com/mail_250  
(back) Subject: Re: NIGHT OF MIRACLES [xposted] From: <OMusic@aol.com> Date: Wed, 8 Dec 2004 12:38:32 EST   That cantata and A SONG UNENDING were popular in the 60's. I haven't = heard of a church doing Peterson in years. I could have played them by memory = back then. I was called at the last minute to accompany a church choir in one = of the cantatas when the organist became ill at the last minute. Anything by =   Peterson was being done by many choirs then. Lee  
(back) Subject: Re: funeral homes From: <OMusic@aol.com> Date: Wed, 8 Dec 2004 12:47:45 EST   I saw my father in the hospital after he died with all the equipment = attached to him to restart his heart and breathing. I will have that scene etched = in my head from now on. I can remember when my grandfather died that there = was viewing, but I did not look at him. I still remember sitting at his feet = with him playing his fiddle and singing to us. That is the scene I will always =   remember of him. In most of the funerals for which I have played, there = has been viewing. The saddest was for a two year old boy with several brothers and =   sisters. They all gathered around the casket crying loudly during the = viewing. The mother became distraught and had to be helped out. Lee  
(back) Subject: Re: Go Tell It on the Mountain From: "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> Date: Wed, 08 Dec 2004 11:48:18 -0600   OK - it is by Wayne Keck - and it is in a collection called Laudate, Vol 1, published by Concordia   Margo Dillard wrote: > I have one by someone named Keck that is very cute. It has a sort of > samba rhythm throughout. It is in a collection of hymn-tuned based > music - I can picture the cover, but can't think of the name. It has a > pink cover... If no one else comes up with it, I will look it up. I > used it at a Christmas concert last week. > > Margarete Thomsen wrote: > >> Can anyone recommend organ settings of this tune? >> >> MARGARETE THOMSEN >> Director of Music Ministries/Liturgist >> Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (ELCA) >> >> >> ****************************************************************** >> "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >> PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >> HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >> List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >> Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >> List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> >> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> >> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >> >> > >     -- Dr. Margo Dillard Organist, FUMC, Lewisville, TX Musical Feast Choral Society Dillard Piano & Organ Studio    
(back) Subject: Re: Meeting Interesting people From: <OMusic@aol.com> Date: Wed, 8 Dec 2004 13:03:26 EST   When in college my professor had a book about how to fake your way with certain types of musicians. When it came to organists it said something = like, leave them alone, they are in a world of their own. Lee  
(back) Subject: RE: NIGHT OF MIRACLES [xposted] From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Wed, 8 Dec 2004 12:54:53 -0600   That cantata and A SONG UNENDING were popular in the 60's. I haven't heard of a church doing Peterson in years. I could have played them by memory back then. I was called at the last minute to accompany a church choir in one of the cantatas when the organist became ill at the last minute. Anything by Peterson was being done by many choirs then. Lee       Those Peterson cantatas are a sight better--and very accessible, too--in comparison with the majority of stock cantatas published today.   Another popular one was LOVE TRANSCENDING   Daniel Hancock Springfield, Missouri