PipeChat Digest #4988 - Saturday, December 11, 2004
 
Dear me that took its time coming.........
  by "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com>
Re: Dear me that took its time coming.........
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
a cautionary tale
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Dear me that took its time coming.........
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Let's be tolerant but tend to our own gardens.
  by "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com>
Re: "Night of Snobbery"
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Nobel organist
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
A Classical Christmas [x-posted, off-topic]
  by "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com>
Re: Night of Snobbery
  by "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com>
More music from organs and organists online
  by "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr>
The Ignorant Brethren
  by <Steskinner@aol.com>
Re: Let's be tolerant but tend to our own gardens.
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Recital News
  by "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com>
Re: Recital News
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Organs & Church Music In Holland
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
Re: Organs & Church Music In Holland
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Recital News
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
who wrote "this is the day which the lord has made"?
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: who wrote "this is the day which the lord has made"?
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: who wrote "this is the day which the lord has made"?
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: who wrote "this is the day which the lord has made"?
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: who wrote "this is the day which the lord has made"?
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
RE: Rodgers 945
  by "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@earthlink.net>
Re: who wrote "this is the day which the lord has made"?
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: Organs & Church Music In Holland
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
Re: Organs & Church Music In Holland
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: Dear me that took its time coming......... From: "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com> Date: Fri, 10 Dec 2004 09:45:01 -0800   Roger Brown wrote,   =3D-> Dear me that took its time coming.........   If you wish to advocate Petersen over so much of the simple yet good quality music that is available for all sort of choirs and congregations be my guest.   But I cannot agree - EVER. Nor will I *ever* accept that opting for the best possible quality in music (even if that means relative simplicity) equates to snobbery. <-=3D   ------------   Well, I really have not "advocated" Peterson "over" other music - "good quality" or otherwise. I was simply -- and, if I may say so myself, wisely -- acknowledging the fact that many people do cherish the work. What's the harm, really, in warming a few hearts with this chestnut?   If you apply the "Roger Brown Standard" to, what, 90% of holiday music, well, there really wouldn't be a whole lot left, would there. If we were to throw into the fireplace all the holiday music that people love and that they derive cheer from, then our music cabinets would be quite barren.   Yet there ARE those who would presume to snatch away people's beloved yet "substandard" Christmas songs ... "Do You Hear What I Hear" - "Away In A Manger" - "There's A Song in the Air" - and I can just hear them snarling, "Bah, Humbug!" as they turn their backs in scorn.   ~ C      
(back) Subject: Re: Dear me that took its time coming......... From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Fri, 10 Dec 2004 10:05:00 -0800   I was once a fire-breathing newly-minted conservatory graduate with similar ideas (chuckle); like so many others, I learned my lesson over a career that spanned a half-century.   We MIGHT have been able to stave off CCM and praise bands if WE'D been a LITTLE more flexible.   There are SOME things in that genre that ARE genuinely moving (at least to me) ... "Lamb of God" (Paris ... yes, THAT Paris) in an SATB arrangement, and "Lord, Is It I?" (can't remember the composer) for Maundy Thursday were both in St. Matthew's choir's repertoire, and St. Matthew's was one of the HIGHEST Anglican churches in America (grin).   That same congregation was DELIGHTED to be allowed to sing "God Be With You Till We Meet Again" to the OLD tune WITH the refrain, AND "The Ninety and Nine" (virtually the ONLY hymn that fits that particular Gospel pericope).   Being a SOUTHERN anglo-catholic, I was used to that kind of mixture (chuckle) ... it's quite common in African-American anglo-catholic churches all over the country ... Gospel songs cheek-by-jowl with Gregorian chants (grin).   Never bothered me.   Cheers,   Bud   Charlie Lester wrote:   > Roger Brown wrote, > > =3D-> Dear me that took its time coming......... > > If you wish to advocate Petersen over so much of the simple yet good > quality music that is available for all sort of choirs and congregations =   > be my guest. > > But I cannot agree - EVER. Nor will I *ever* accept that opting for the > best possible quality in music (even if that means relative simplicity) > equates to snobbery. <-=3D > > ------------ > > Well, I really have not "advocated" Peterson "over" other music - "good > quality" or otherwise. I was simply -- and, if I may say so myself, > wisely -- acknowledging the fact that many people do cherish the work. > What's the harm, really, in warming a few hearts with this chestnut? > > If you apply the "Roger Brown Standard" to, what, 90% of holiday music, > well, there really wouldn't be a whole lot left, would there. If we were =   > to throw into the fireplace all the holiday music that people love and > that they derive cheer from, then our music cabinets would be quite = barren. > > Yet there ARE those who would presume to snatch away people's beloved > yet "substandard" Christmas songs ... "Do You Hear What I Hear" - "Away > In A Manger" - "There's A Song in the Air" - and I can just hear them > snarling, "Bah, Humbug!" as they turn their backs in scorn. > > ~ > C > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: a cautionary tale From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Fri, 10 Dec 2004 10:14:53 -0800   I am reminded of the sad case of the (Episcopal) Church of St. Ignatius of Antioch in New York City on West End Ave. Both its music and its liturgy are preserved in amber (chuckle). The choir sings NOTHING but a cappella choral music in Latin, primarily renaissance polyphony and Gregorian Chant. Granted, the organ is no great shakes (a rather strange Casavant from the 1980s [?]) but all that is SO far removed from the Anglican tradition that one needs binoculars to see any resemblance = (grin).   I suppose at one time it was a flourishing parish ... certainly they built an imposing church ... but on Easter Day last there were exactly fifty people at the Solemn Mass. The organist's salary is a pittance for Manhattan; the singers do it for little more than subway fare and meals because they like the repertoire.   BUT, the bottom line is that the place is dying. Even in a huge metropolis like Manhattan, there isn't a sufficiently large "niche market" to support a church like St. Ignatius.   The much larger and better-known Church of St. Mary the Virgin has experienced similar difficulties in recent years, for somewhat dissimilar reasons, not the least of which being the peremptory dismissal of a succession of organists by a succession of "cardinal rectors."   "Holding the fort" may be emotionally and musically satisfying, but it doesn't pay the bills OR spread the Gospel, which, after all, is what we're SUPPOSED to be about.   Cheers,   Bud          
(back) Subject: Re: Dear me that took its time coming......... From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Fri, 10 Dec 2004 14:06:40 EST   In a message dated 12/10/2004 1:00:21 PM Eastern Standard Time, quilisma@cox.net writes:   > That same congregation was DELIGHTED to be allowed to sing "God Be With > You Till We Meet Again" to the OLD tune WITH the refrain, AND "The > Ninety and Nine" (virtually the ONLY hymn that fits that particular > Gospel pericope). > > Being a SOUTHERN anglo-catholic,   i am delighted and shocked.....i thot i was the only one from CCM that = knew the Ninety and Nine......let alone have it sung. :-)   dale in Florida wondering if the world is coming to an end or if i missed =   the rapture.  
(back) Subject: Let's be tolerant but tend to our own gardens. From: "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com> Date: Fri, 10 Dec 2004 11:36:37 -0800   =3D->   Roy Kersey wrote,   [....] There is just no explaining the various cultures and musical preferences growing up in our pluralistic society. I think that rather than get upset that others don't share our preferences, we should be content to continue to do what we do well and try to draw others to it.... Let's be tolerant but tend to our own gardens.   <-=3D     :est anyone misinterpret the gist of my posting about the "Alice in Wonderland Funeral," I did not mean my commentary to imply that I did not approve of what goes on in that church or that I would begrudge a predominately Latino parish the music of their culture.   Far from that, I would never presume to stand in judgment of what goes on in someone else's church. Especially within the context of the clich=E9, "Those who live in glass houses [or play in glass churches] shouldn't throw stones."   I was simply ruminating about the stark study in contrasts - a beautiful, acoustically superb room that really does just beg for an organ ... a stereotypical, white-haired, pink-cheeked Irish priest presiding over a flock of predominately Latino parishioners ... in a community most notorious for the race riot that tore through it ... a church full of predominately African-American Lutherans attending a funeral there ... an excellent singer opting to whip out her tape of "Ave Maria." And so on.   On the latter count, I found out today when talking to the daughter of the deceased that that was the one selection the family was really keen on having sung. I guess the singer knew that and felt it would be better to play her tape than not do it at all and disappoint the family.   So again, I was not so much being intolerant as I was just pretty much feeling a bit of culture shock. Granted, since I myself termed my own commentary as "unflattering," I can see why it may have been mis-construed.   ~ C      
(back) Subject: Re: "Night of Snobbery" From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 10 Dec 2004 14:40:43 -0500   On 12/10/04 11:53 AM, "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> wrote:   > Perhaps it's a translation issue?   I think that is the case. If you don't find it within an hour or two, let me know, and I'll zero in on exact verse. Very similar phrases appear mayb= e a dozen times in St. Paul's letters, but I think that's the one that is the lyric of the cantata=8Bin King James.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Nobel organist From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 10 Dec 2004 14:47:03 -0500   On 12/10/04 12:23 PM, "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk> = wrote:   > Oslo should really have built a pipe organ for its Town Hall to = accomodate > such artists!   You can provoke them by pointing out that the Stockholm Town Hall has (I'm ALMOST certain) a quite decent pipe organ!   Alan    
(back) Subject: A Classical Christmas [x-posted, off-topic] From: "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com> Date: Fri, 10 Dec 2004 11:48:46 -0800   So here's shameless plug for a new Christmas CD by my brother, pianist Noel Lester. It is getting tremendously favorable reviews.   (See http://christmasreviews.com/wnoellester2.shtml - click on "our review")   See this link to obtain the CD: http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/noellester   And here's a link to his web site: www.hood.edu/academic/music/noel   This is Noel's second Christmas CD, and his 12th CD altogether.   He's an incredibly fine pianist as the numerous "rave reviews" cited on his web site attest - but get the CD and hear for yourselves!   ~ ~~~ ~~~~~~~ Charlie Lester A Very Proud Younger Brother      
(back) Subject: Re: Night of Snobbery From: "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com> Date: Fri, 10 Dec 2004 16:04:56 -0500   From Roger Brown: "But I cannot agree - EVER. Nor will I *ever* accept = that opting for the best possible quality in music (even if that means relative =   simplicity) equates to snobbery."   I have my own notion of what "best possible quality" means, but really = it's mostly within the context of my own denomination and I've always thought = it was somewhat open to interpretation anyway.   I'm willing to contend that the music of J.S. Bach is better quality than, say, Barry Manilow, but since you sound like you know exactly what "best possible quality" means in an absolute sense, please enlighten us. I bet = my congregation will be grateful!    
(back) Subject: More music from organs and organists online From: "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr> Date: Sat, 11 Dec 2004 00:15:42 +0200   Dear List,   We have put more good music online for you at http://www.organsandorganistsonline.com/ If you want to get off to a lively start, 14 year old Jared Grenz gives a brilliant performance of Charpentier's "Prelude to the Te Deum" on the Trumpet, accompanied by his dad, Timothy Grenz on the II/23 1960 Reuter Organ in Chetek Lutheran Church Wisconsin - this kid is a star!   Another of the up and coming generation, Greg Ceurvorst, plays the first movement of Bach's Trio Sonata No. 2 -"Vivace" (BWV 526) on the III/35 = 1998 Wicks Organ in St. Peter's United Church of Christ Frankfort, Illinois USA =   with delightfully pungent registration.   There are two works from Aarnoud de Groen, the Fantasy and Fugue in g = minor (BWV 542) and the Chorale Prelude, Nun komm der Heiden Heiden (BWV 659) played on the III/28 Vierdag Organ in the Bethlehemkerk, The Hague, NL . Aarnoud's own composition "Fantasy on Psalm 75" has proved a popular listener's selection, and this work is also available in the "scores" section as a file download.   To make sure balance is maintained, Wayne Grauel plays the Concerto in b minor (Meck) by Walther on the Cantor digital organ in his home.   After the discussion on the Widor on the list Timothy Grenz's fine performance of the Toccata returned to first place, with 122 downloads so far this month, knocking young Nodtvedt (Bach D Minor Toccata) off his perch. I expect he'll be back! It does seem that Toccatas are the best way =   of getting an audience.   We have added three organs to the "ORGANS" section for the specification enthusiast, two from Monaco, the two manual Cavaille Coll in the Chapelle des Carmes and the 3 manual Boisseau instrument in the Cathedral, and the new (2000) 3 manual van den Heuvel organ of Katarina Church, Stockholm, Sweden.   John Foss http://www.organsandorganistsonline.com/      
(back) Subject: The Ignorant Brethren From: <Steskinner@aol.com> Date: Fri, 10 Dec 2004 17:41:58 EST   In a message dated 12/10/2004 11:54:59 AM Eastern Standard Time, dhancock@brpae.com writes: "But I would not have you be ignorant, Brethren." I thought this was the biblical warning against joining the world's = largest denomination... the Ingnorant Brethren.     Steven Skinner Minister of Music First Presbyterian Church of the Covenant Erie, PA  
(back) Subject: Re: Let's be tolerant but tend to our own gardens. From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 10 Dec 2004 17:53:13 -0500   On 12/10/04 2:36 PM, "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com> wrote:   > predominately Latino parishioners ...   Charlie: No sweat. Knowing yon (on list) as I do, I think I took it exactly as you meant it, throughout.   I guess it's been too long since I spent much time in California. Is "Chicano" no longer the label of choice?   Alan    
(back) Subject: Recital News From: "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 10 Dec 2004 16:13:44 -0800 (PST)   I gave a recital to fulfill my degree here at the University of Illinois = last night. The turn out was amazing, with over 100 people there. Not = bad for a school recital in a rather small town. It was a good feeling = that so many people were amazed by an organist. (I played the Prelude and = Fugue in D by Bach and the organ was in the front and centered so that I = was visible.) Just ensured my faith in practicing so much for these recitals!   Scott Montgomery       Scott Montgomery 619 W Church St Champaign, IL 61820 217-390-0158 www.ScottMontgomeryMusic.net  
(back) Subject: Re: Recital News From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 10 Dec 2004 19:47:42 -0500   On 12/10/04 7:13 PM, "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com> wrote:   > I gave a recital to fulfill my degree here at the University of Illinois = last > night. The turn out was amazing, with over 100 people there. Not bad fo= r a > school recital in a rather small town.   Scott: Well, OK, that=B9s YOUR opinion! But I=B9ll bet you=B9re right. A hundred-plus for a student recital?? You must be something, or have got folks to THINK so!=20   Seriously, my huge praise to you for a performance that was way beyond my geographical reach=8Band may there be many more! Let us know when you=B9ll be in or near NYC!   Alan www.stlukesnyc.org =20    
(back) Subject: Organs & Church Music In Holland From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Fri, 10 Dec 2004 19:57:07 -0500   My wife and I hope to travel in the Netherlands some day, likely as = part of some more travel in Germany as well. I am aware of some famous organs = at Haarlem, & Zwolle, but might I seek advice from one or more list readers here as to places we should try to see/hear and perhaps comments about significant organs which one might be able to arrange briefly to play as well. Or are all of the significant organs off limits to tourists like = me?   Related: my wife wishes we could go during tulip season. Is there a limited actual season for tulips in Holland, or do they grow for several months? If so, what months? We would think in terms of perhaps April or May or June.   Indeed, if there are other places to visit and/or things we should = see, we'd be grateful for your guidance as well.   Thanks. Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA    
(back) Subject: Re: Organs & Church Music In Holland From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 10 Dec 2004 20:16:58 -0500   On 12/10/04 7:57 PM, "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> wrote:   > might I seek advice from one or more list readers here as to places [in > Holland] we should try to see/hear and perhaps comments about significant > organs which one might be able to arrange briefly to play as well. Or ar= e all > of the significant organs off limits to tourists like me?   Colin Mitchell:   You've probably seen this post from Karl.   I've heard him in Sunday recital at St. Thomas, Fifth Avenue, New York=8Bsurely a TOP venue in the Western hemisphere. He needs no further credentials than that. I urge you to give him that maximum advice, "steering," and even letters of reference that you can offer. He's EXTREMELY knowledgeable about the instrument (in elaborate detail) and all its literature. (But I suspect you already knew all that.)   Alan  
(back) Subject: Re: Recital News From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Fri, 10 Dec 2004 20:08:12 -0600   Congrats, Scott! I really wish I could have been there. I heard it was wonderful.   Alicia Zeilenga   -----Original Message----- From: Scott Montgomery <montre1978@yahoo.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Fri, 10 Dec 2004 16:13:44 -0800 (PST) Subject: Recital News   > I gave a recital to fulfill my degree here at the University of > Illinois last night. The turn out was amazing, with over 100 people > there. Not bad for a school recital in a rather small town. It was a > good feeling that so many people were amazed by an organist. (I played > the Prelude and Fugue in D by Bach and the organ was in the front and > centered so that I was visible.) > > Just ensured my faith in practicing so much for these recitals! > > Scott Montgomery > > > > Scott Montgomery > 619 W Church St > Champaign, IL 61820 > 217-390-0158 > www.ScottMontgomeryMusic.net > >      
(back) Subject: who wrote "this is the day which the lord has made"? From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Fri, 10 Dec 2004 21:17:00 EST   i'm hoping someone can help me locate this very well-known rendition of = "this is the day which the lord has made." it's in triple meter and i think = it's in e-flat major. the melody of the title phrase begins with an octave = descent, then an upward scale ascent -- e-flat, e-flat, f, g, a-flat, b-flat, c, c, =   b-flat. the rhythm is half note, eighth, eighth, quarter, quarter, = quarter, half, quarter, dotted half.   i've known this song since i was very young, but i have no clue who wrote = it. i even directed it as choirmaster for a couple of years at a previous church, but don't have the score anymore.   also, does ANYBODY know anything about the background of "bach's memento" = by widor?   thanks,   scot  
(back) Subject: Re: who wrote "this is the day which the lord has made"? From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 10 Dec 2004 21:24:18 -0500   On 12/10/04 9:17 PM, "BlueeyedBear@aol.com" <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> wrote:   > i'm hoping someone can help me locate this very well-known rendition of "= this > is the day which the lord has made."   I know it only as the Gradual for Easter Sunday. Can you focus in more closely? Are you looking for an anthem? A chant? A duet? The tune? The text? One way or another, it=B9s available in DOZENS of sources. What sources/hymnals do you have? Liber usualis? Lutheran Book of Worship? It=B9s EVERYwhere!   Alan  
(back) Subject: Re: who wrote "this is the day which the lord has made"? From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Fri, 10 Dec 2004 21:25:59 EST   it's an anthem. i know it was popular in the 60s, and surely before that (i'm a 60s child).   scot  
(back) Subject: Re: who wrote "this is the day which the lord has made"? From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 10 Dec 2004 21:27:11 -0500   On 12/10/04 9:17 PM, "BlueeyedBear@aol.com" <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> wrote:   > help me locate this very well-known rendition of "this is the day which t= he > lord has made." it's in triple meter   Thinking more, the settings I=B9ve used have been not metrical at all. Plainchant. And WHICH =B3very well-known rendition=B2 are you speaking of?   Alan  
(back) Subject: Re: who wrote "this is the day which the lord has made"? From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 10 Dec 2004 21:38:27 -0500   On 12/10/04 9:25 PM, "BlueeyedBear@aol.com" <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> wrote:   > it's an anthem. i know it was popular in the 60s, and surely before that= (i'm > a 60s child). >=20 OK, tell me what brand of church you=B9re in. Actually, it=B9s been popular fo= r way over 1000 years. But how to USE it may depend on what variety of churc= h you=B9re in. Dig? And when you want to use it, I think.   Alan =20      
(back) Subject: RE: Rodgers 945 From: "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 10 Dec 2004 21:01:17 -0600   Fascinating!     Michael - also sometimes known as MD     _____   From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of OrganMD@aol.com Sent: Monday, December 06, 2004 9:37 AM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Rodgers 945     Utah    
(back) Subject: Re: who wrote "this is the day which the lord has made"? From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Fri, 10 Dec 2004 22:06:19 EST   ok, it was a choral anthem. i used to have the entire anthem, but that = was in another lifetime. i grew up in a southern baptist church which used = only the first page or so as a choral call to worship. as i recall, the anthem =   closes with the same few phrases in which it opens.  
(back) Subject: Re: Organs & Church Music In Holland From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Fri, 10 Dec 2004 21:45:16 -0500   Alan is so kind. I=B9m blushing!   Thanx, Alan.   Karl   On 12/10/04 8:16 PM, "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> wrote:   > On 12/10/04 7:57 PM, "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> wrot= e: >=20 >> > might I seek advice from one or more list readers here as to places [i= n >> > Holland] we should try to see/hear and perhaps comments about signific= ant >> > organs which one might be able to arrange briefly to play as well. Or= are >> all=20 >> > of the significant organs off limits to tourists like me? >=20 > Colin Mitchell: >=20 > You've probably seen this post from Karl. >=20 > I've heard him in Sunday recital at St. Thomas, Fifth Avenue, New York=8Bsu= rely > a TOP venue in the Western hemisphere. He needs no further credentials t= han > that. I urge you to give him that maximum advice, "steering," and even > letters of reference that you can offer. He's EXTREMELY knowledgeable ab= out > the instrument (in elaborate detail) and all its literature. (But I suspe= ct > you already knew all that.) >=20 > Alan      
(back) Subject: Re: Organs & Church Music In Holland From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 10 Dec 2004 20:50:52 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   I will have a dig around and see what I can recommend.     The Dutch are very hospitable and unassuming, and always receive serious musicians very courteously.   I will reply to Karl personally, because the information could be quite extensive.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       > <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> wrote: > > > >> > might I seek advice from one or more list > readers here as to places [in > >> > Holland] we should try to see/hear etc.....     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The all-new My Yahoo! - Get yours free! http://my.yahoo.com