PipeChat Digest #4991 - Sunday, December 12, 2004
 
Re: Organs & Church Music In Holland
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com>
Peterson
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: Organs & Church Music In Holland
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Taylor & Boody at Christchurch
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: Taylor & Boody at Christchurch
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Taylor & Boody at Christchurch
  by "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com>
Galoubeth
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
From the pages of (recent) history - 1993
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
The muse strikes again - Christmas mp3
  by "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net>
Rudolph Done in Latin
  by "Robert Bell" <bobbell@optonline.net>
Re: who wrote "this is the day which the lord has made"?
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
Re: Taylor & Boody at Christchurch
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Organs & Church Music In Holland From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com> Date: Sat, 11 Dec 2004 17:46:52 -0500   At 03:45 AM 2004-12-11 -0500, you wrote: >In a message dated 12/10/2004 4:58:45 PM Pacific Standard Time, >kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu writes: >but might I seek advice from one or more list readers >here as to places we should try to see/hear and perhaps comments about >significant organs > >I recommend the Sunday Morning Service at the Boven Kerk in Kampen, a >lovely ancient city. When we were there a few years ago, the organist >improvised a magnificent symphony on chorales and psalms for the prelude. =   >The congregational introductions were amazing and the huge congregation >sang with great enthusiasm. Yes, the lady sitting next to us noted that = we >Americans who not have Dutch peppermints, and promptly provided them for >us! Normally your have one peppermint for each of the three points of the =   >sermon. The Congregation is of a healthy conservative nature and the nave =   >was crowded. The organ is a Muller. > >Jerry van der Pol >Seattle   Jerry,   The large organ at the Boven Kerk, Kampen is a Hinsz organ, not a Mueller. All the same it is a magnificent instrument.   Arie V.  
(back) Subject: Peterson From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Sat, 11 Dec 2004 18:21:49 -0600   And Peterson's music very much has a certain sound.....once you are aware = of the harmonies he uses, you can almost instantly identify a Peterson = number. I always think of his stuff as the CCM of the 1950's and early 1960's.   Someone a little more competent in theory than I will have to analyze the sound.....but he enjoys some unusual chords and suspensions, etc. that, to my way of thinking, give it a "cool" modern flavor. Dennis Steckley Lover of Cats, Pipe Organs & 1940-65 Sewing Machines    
(back) Subject: Re: Organs & Church Music In Holland From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Sat, 11 Dec 2004 18:56:04 -0600   There is a webpage about the Bovenkerk organ at = http://home.wxs.nl/~bovenkerk/hinszde.html Looking at the case one can see why one might think it was a Muller = organ, since it is very similar to the Bavokerk in Haarlem. The website = gives the e-mail address of the organist, so it would be easy to contact = him and ask if it was possible to visit. I was wondering if Karl might = be confusing the organ with the very similar one in the Martinikerk in = Bolsward, but on looking this one up I see that it is a Hinsz and not a = Muller too!   John Speller ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Arie Vandenberg=20 To: PipeChat=20 Sent: Saturday, December 11, 2004 4:46 PM Subject: Re: Organs & Church Music In Holland     At 03:45 AM 2004-12-11 -0500, you wrote:   In a message dated 12/10/2004 4:58:45 PM Pacific Standard Time, = kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu writes:   but might I seek advice from one or more list readers   here as to places we should try to see/hear and perhaps comments = about   significant organs=20     I recommend the Sunday Morning Service at the Boven Kerk in Kampen, = a lovely ancient city. When we were there a few years ago, the organist = improvised a magnificent symphony on chorales and psalms for the = prelude. The congregational introductions were amazing and the huge = congregation sang with great enthusiasm. Yes, the lady sitting next to = us noted that we Americans who not have Dutch peppermints, and promptly = provided them for us! Normally your have one peppermint for each of the = three points of the sermon. The Congregation is of a healthy = conservative nature and the nave was crowded. The organ is a Muller. =20 Jerry van der Pol Seattle   Jerry,   The large organ at the Boven Kerk, Kampen is a Hinsz organ, not a = Mueller. All the same it is a magnificent instrument.   Arie V.  
(back) Subject: Taylor & Boody at Christchurch From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Sat, 11 Dec 2004 18:57:53 -0600   Scott......since you've played the Taylor & Boody at Christchurch on the Circle in Indianapolis, tell us a bit about the sound. I downloaded some = of your recital there, but my connection was too slow. Any how, it sounded very nice, but more "baroque" than I expected for that congregation. = Guess I was figuring they'd have a warmer, more romantic sound. Do you know = what this organ replaced-was it a Moller or perhaps a Holloway?     I have heard/played the T & B in Vincennes, Indiana.   Dennis Steckley Lover of Cats, Pipe Organs & 1940-65 Sewing Machines    
(back) Subject: Re: Taylor & Boody at Christchurch From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sat, 11 Dec 2004 20:09:33 EST   Is there not a contrasting 4-manual Wolff in the chancel, with trackers running beneath the floor? If we are speaking of the same place, I have = played both organs, and actually pumped the Taylor & Boody manually.   SMG  
(back) Subject: Re: Taylor & Boody at Christchurch From: "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 11 Dec 2004 17:53:09 -0800 (PST)   Christ Church has the best of both worlds. They have the Taylor and Boody = but there also have a 4 manual Wolff organ in the front.   "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> = wrote:Scott......since you've played the Taylor & Boody at Christchurch on = the Circle in Indianapolis, tell us a bit about the sound. I downloaded some = of your recital there, but my connection was too slow. Any how, it sounded very nice, but more "baroque" than I expected for that congregation. Guess I was figuring they'd have a warmer, more romantic sound. Do you know what this organ replaced-was it a Moller or perhaps a Holloway?     I have heard/played the T & B in Vincennes, Indiana.   Dennis Steckley Lover of Cats, Pipe Organs & 1940-65 Sewing Machines     ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: List-Digest: List-Unsubscribe:         Scott Montgomery 619 W Church St Champaign, IL 61820 217-390-0158 www.ScottMontgomeryMusic.net  
(back) Subject: Galoubeth From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Sat, 11 Dec 2004 20:15:59 -0600   While we are talking about Dutch organs, the 1872 Adema organ in the = Allemanskerk, Oudskarspel, Nederland has a stop on the Positief at 1 ft. = pitch called Galoubeth. I see from my musical dictionary that a = Galoubet was a kind of recorder or fipple flute, especially popular in = Provence, so the stop is presumably of Blokfluit construction. Does = anyone know of any other organs with a stop called Galoubeth?   John Speller
(back) Subject: From the pages of (recent) history - 1993 From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Sat, 11 Dec 2004 22:49:32 EST   The October 1993 issue of "The American Organist" journal carried reports = of the AGO Regional Conventions / 1993. Region VII's competition winner was = Trey Clegg, a student of Al Travis. Of interest is that Mr. Clegg included in = his recital a work of his own, "Old Hundredth Fantasy on D.A.D.," his father's =   favorite hymn tune.   I am very interested to know if this work has been published. I would be = most appreciative of hearing either from Mr. Clegg or Mr. Travis - or anyone = who has an answer for my query. Of course, name of the publisher would be extremely helpful.   While not a pressing issue at this very moment (as we are approaching and working toward Christmastide), it seems to me a piece on "D.A.D." would be =   wonderful music to learn and program for Father's Day 2005.   Happy Holidays to one and all!   Dale G. Rider Independence, MO  
(back) Subject: The muse strikes again - Christmas mp3 From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> Date: Sat, 11 Dec 2004 20:38:49 -0800   You'd think I'm busy enough this week that my mind wouldn't do this to = me... Started it Friday afternoon, finished Saturday....   Good King Wenceslas (Toccata Nervosa)   http://evensongmusic.net/audio/OrwigWenceslas.mp3   Enjoy,   Jonathan  
(back) Subject: Rudolph Done in Latin From: "Robert Bell" <bobbell@optonline.net> Date: Sun, 12 Dec 2004 00:22:42 -0500   This was on AOL. Really got me laughing.   NEW YORK, Dec. 9 /PRNewswire/ -- Let the reindeer games begin! This = holiday season, hark back to the good old days-way back-with a novelty version of "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer," sung in Latin. The arrangement, sung by the all-professional choir of New York City's St. Bartholomew's Church on Park Avenue, is cleared for broadcast and available for MP3 and AIFF download.   NOTE: On Friday, December 17th at 8 PM ET/PT, CBS will air the 40th anniversary broadcast of "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer(R)," the longest-running holiday special in television history. The digitally re-mastered classic has entertained millions of families since 1964, with the famous musical score from Johnny Marks and the vocal talent of = legendary performer Burl Ives (Sam the Snowman).   Burl Ives created a classic, but he never sang Rudolph in Latin! Hear it = -- play it -- and urge your listeners to sing along:   Rudolphus rubrinasus Johnny Marks/Arr. Philip Brunelle   Rudolphus rubrinasus fulgentissimo naso,   vidisti et si eum dicas quoque candere.   Omnes tarandi ceteri ridebant vocantes nomina;   non sinebant Rudolphum interessa ludentes.   olim crassa nocte Christi, Nicolaus it dictum:   "Rudolphe, naso tam claro, agesne traham meam?"   Qui tum tarandis amor conclamantibus eum,   "Rudolphe, rubrinase descendes historia!"   Performers: New York City's St. Bartholomew's Choir; William K. Trafka, conductor Timings: 1:09 Latin only (MP3: 2.6MB; AIFF: 11.7MB) 2:17 Latin & English (MP3: 5.2MB; AIFF: 23.1MB)   Download MP3 or AIFF file:   http://www.villagesound.com/stbarts/rudolph.html     Reminder to broadcasters: broadcast of this recording is subject to the broadcaster having an appropriate public performance license from the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers.   When St. Bartholomew's Church brought Leopold Stokowski from Europe in = 1905 to be its organist, it made what has turned out to be a lasting commitment to great music. The dedication of the great domed church on Park Avenue at 51st Street, and the gradual construction of what is now the largest pipe organ in New York City, underscored that commitment. St. Bartholomew's = Choir is an ensemble of expert choral singers from the New York City area. They sing for the church's Sunday 11 am services, as well as major concerts throughout the year as part of St. Bart's Great Music Series.   For information about St. Bart's holiday concerts, including a performance of "Rudolphus" during "A Joyous Christmas Concert" on December 21st, visit http://www.stbarts.org.   Bob Bell    
(back) Subject: Re: who wrote "this is the day which the lord has made"? From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Sun, 12 Dec 2004 00:38:19 -0600   Scot wrote:   > i'm hoping someone can help me locate this very well-known rendition > of "this is the day which the lord has made." it's in triple meter > and i /think/ it's in e-flat major. the melody of the title phrase > begins with an octave descent, then an upward scale ascent -- e-flat, > e-flat, f, g, a-flat, b-flat, c, c, b-flat. the rhythm is half note, > eighth, eighth, quarter, quarter, quarter, half, quarter, dotted half.   and I've managed to find one setting of this response, in _The Church School Hymnal for Youth_, which has the melodic contour Scot mentions: a downward leap, followed by an upward scale ascent, and it could be in triple time, though in the source I have, it has is in Common time. It's not exactly the same, though; the intitial downward leap is a fifth, instead of an octave (B-flat to Eflat) and the melody is a bit different. The setting there is by Calvin Laufer, and is dated 1926. Despite the similarities, I do not think this is the version Scot refers to, which I think I've seen in a hymnal I own, but which does not seem to be in the places I expect.   ns  
(back) Subject: Re: Taylor & Boody at Christchurch From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Sun, 12 Dec 2004 02:23:06 EST     In a message dated 12/11/04 7:01:00 PM, kzrev@rr1.net writes:     > Scott......since you've played the Taylor & Boody at Christchurch on the > Circle in Indianapolis, tell us a bit about the sound.=A0 I downloaded som= e of > your recital there, but my connection was too slow.=A0 Any how, it sounded > very nice, but more "baroque" than I expected for that congregation.=A0 Gu= ess > I was figuring they'd have a warmer, more romantic sound.=A0 Do you know w= hat > this organ replaced-was it a Moller or perhaps a Holloway? >=20 >=20 >=20   there is a wolff french romantic instrument in the chancel-hence a baroque=20 gallery organ. gfc       Gregory Ceurvorst 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS Evanston, IL 60201 847.332.2788 home/fax 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net