PipeChat Digest #4992 - Sunday, December 12, 2004
 
Albertus Anthonie Hinsz
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Compton Extension  (Extensive!)
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: Compton Extension  (Extensive!)
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
Possible Christmas choir anthem
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Motab playlist
  by <DudelK@aol.com>
Re: Possible Christmas choir anthem
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
battle hymn of the republic
  by "wesley" <wcool@bellsouth.net>
Re: battle hymn of the republic
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: battle hymn of the republic
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
 

(back) Subject: Albertus Anthonie Hinsz From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 12 Dec 2004 04:42:10 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   The name Muller is synonymous with Dutch organ building in the eyes (and ears) of many, but in actual fact, the name Albertus Anthonie Hinsz is every bit as important in Holland.   Hinsz was a Hamburg organ-builder who travelled to Holland (Groningen)in 1728 and continued the tradition of Arp Schnitger; in fact marrying Schnitger's widow in, I believe, 1732.   His first commission was to renovate the Schnitger organ in the Martinikerk.   As an organ-builder, he certainly ranks very high on the list of Baroque organ-builders of the period.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> wrote:   > There is a webpage about the Bovenkerk organ at > http://home.wxs.nl/~bovenkerk/hinszde.html > Looking at the case one can see why one might think > it was a Muller organ, since it is very similar to > the Bavokerk in Haarlem.     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - Helps protect you from nasty viruses. http://promotions.yahoo.com/new_mail  
(back) Subject: Compton Extension (Extensive!) From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 12 Dec 2004 06:34:35 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   I've been digging about a bit in my "sin bin" of incomplete notes and collected rubbish, hoping that I might discover the true facts about John Compton extension organs.   Unfortunately, I simply have neither the time nor the inclination to turn it into a major thesis for the list, but I am able to "shed a little light" on the skill of John Compton as a builder of very musical instruments and something of a pioneer in synthetic tone production.   John Compton was enormously innovative, and worked to a very high standard indeed. Although he was apprenticed to Hathaway (not a well known builder in the UK), his interest must have been kindled by the time he spent with Brindley & Foster of Sheffield; a company who took pneumatic actions and console controls to new heights of complexity.   Of course, all this corresponded with the growing science and engineering of electricity and electronics, and he was always innovative enough to include all sorts of gadgets, diaphonic devices, luminous stop heads, stop keys, combination actions and low voltage direct electric actions running from dynamos attached to the blower units.   In fact, Compton was fairly unique in the history of organ-building in the UK; for he adopted the Hope-Jones unit system which was to become frowned upon by "serious" musicians and many of his peers.   The point of departure came during the war years, when he spent time in Italy; happily hacking away at organ pipes in rural churches with a view to creating all sorts of novel tone colour synthesis.   The ever fertile mind sprang into action, and the knowledge gained from his acts of vandalism in Italy, was put to good use; with much the same morality and in the same paradoxical way that the death of a child might benefit medical science!   I have tried to find examples of instruments which reflect his best designs, but sadly, all the sources seem to list nothing but the actual stops on the consoles, rather than the derivations from specific pipe units.   Nevertheless, I came across a few pieces of paper, which seem to show that John Compton was well aware of the problems inherent in using unison ranks as the source of derived mutations; which is what I was hoping to show when I first suggested that I could contribute something to the discussion; with scant regard to the time factor and with a certain cavalier disregard of my own ignorance and bad memory.   Before going into all the business of derivations and pipe units, it might be as well to point out, that at the peak of the Compton business (a huge factory in North London, which had a vast staff turning out cinema and church organs at an alarming rate) John Compton re-built many, many existing organs very successfully; leaving them with huge consoles and not at all a bad sound.   The re-build are NOT true unit organs, for Compton invariably inherited independent Swell Organs and also Choir or Solo organs. Bangor Cathedral is a fine example, where the unit principle does not play a massive part in the scheme of things; the original Hill organ being quite a substantial instrument. The same is also true of the very large instrument of Hull City Hall, on which I used to practise regularly. This 184 (?) stop beast was a very large, almost entirely straight, slider-chest Forster & Andrews (Hull) organ. Although Compton added a Diaphone, Tibia and other units, in addition to percussion registers, the organ remained largely a Forster & Andrews, with the benefit of the Compton "touch".   It is in the entirely new organs, rather than the many re-builds of existing organs, that the true genius of Compton emerges. However, I must qualify my comments before continuing further, because as yet, I have singularly failed to connect what I know that John Compton knew, with an actual example which can demonstrate the point.   However, undaunted as always, and throwing true scholarship to the wind (what's new!), the following will, I hope, illustrate the more advanced "theory" of Compton unit organ building, even though I am not sure whether it was ever actually realised.   From only 20 to 22 units, Compton was able to create a 100 stop instrument of considerable musical worth, built ENTIRELY on the unit principle and utilising split chanbers which, by necessity, would both be enclosed in their own swell boxes.   Let's look at a typical (theoretical?) list of units specified, as follows:-   The various units are marked 'A' through 'V'   FIRST CHAMBER (Enclosed)   Open Diapason I 16' (A) Open Diapason II 5 1/3 (B) (merges with C below > 5.1/3ft) Open Diapason III 16' (C) Quint 5 1/3 (D) Mixture II (independent unisons only) (E) Salicional 16' (F) Stopped Flute 32' (G) Chimney Flute 5 1/3' (H) (merges with G below 5.1/3 Open Flute 2 2/3 (I) (merges with G below 2.2/3ft) Posaune 32' (J) Trumpet 16' (K) Clarinet 16' (L)   SECOND CHAMBER (Enclosed)   Geigen 8' (M) Gemshorn 2 2/3' (N) (merges with M below 2.2/3ft) Gamba 16' (O) Celeste - tierce 8' (P) (Tierce tuned just - Celeste > is a compromise) Bourdon 16' (Q) Spitz Flute 2 2/3' (R) (merges with Q below > 2.2/3ft) Cornopean 16' (S) Oboe 16' (T) Vox Humana 16' (V) -----------------   This is clearly a very clever use of units, for the Tierce (derived from the Celeste) is 'just tuned,' with a resultant compromise in the tuning of the Celeste itself.   However, a seperate Quint unit is a common source of mutation ranks in the various "Mixtures".   Add to this the fact that some of the Mixtures had independent unison ranks, and the natural shortcomings of the extension principle are largely circumnavigated, if not entirely eliminated.   What sort of spcification can be derived from these units?   For the purposes of compression, I shall ignore the fact that a large Compton extension organ has a Pedal division which just borrows more or less everything available at 32ft pitch and above, but may include a seperate Diaphone unit as well as switched Harmonics of 32ft and 16ft pitches gathered from almost everywhere! We therefore don't need to dwell on the Pedal Organs, which should be fairly obvious.   Similarly, on the true Unit Organs (rather than the rebuilt instruments), the Solo and (any) Bombarde division (as at Wakefield Cathedral.....5 manuals) would simply duplex stops from other departments to good effect. To turn around a popular catch-phrase, "What you see is definitely NOT what you get!"   Sticking purely to the manual division of Great, Swell and Choir for the purposes of this discussion, this is how the various units might be utilised (and may well have been on an actual instrument).   It is especially interesting that the Unison Octaves, (both upwards and downwards) avoid missing notes very cleverly, but equally impressive, is the way that ranks merge at lower pitches, thus reducing the number of pipes required. The same trick is used at the highest pitches, where the ear is relatively insensitive to pitch and fine tuning. The Tierce, for instance, may dry up well before the top of the keyboard, and the tinkling Cymbel sounds might well be derived from the highest pipes of a Salicional rank.   This clearly demonstrates that John Compton was acutely aware of tone-colour synthesis and the psychology of "hearing".   For those wo may wish to study this in depth, I would suggest that they cut and paste the Unit List above, and draw it down as an aid to comparison and derivations.   All fascinating stuff, and I'm sorry that I have yet to make a connection between Compton theory and Compton practice.   Does anyone know if the seperate Quints were ever utilised in an actual Compton organ?     GREAT ORGAN (FIRST CHAMBER)     16 Double Open Diapason (C) 16 Bourdon (G) 8 Open Diapason I (A) 8 Open Diapason II (B & C) 8 Hohl flute (G) 8 Stopped Diapason (I) 5 1/3 Quint (D) 4 Principal (B) 4 Stopped Flute (H) 2 2/3 Twelfth (D) 2 Fifteenth (C) - IV Fourniture (D & E) III Cymbal (D & E) 8 Posaune (K) 4 Clarion (K)       CHOIR ORGAN ( FIRST CHAMBER)     16 Contra Salicional (F) 8 Open Diapason (C) 8 Salicional (F) 8 Bourdon (G) 4 Salicet (F) 4 Block flute (G& I) 4 Chimney Flute (H) 2 Salicetina (F) 2 Piccolo (G) 1 1/3 Quint (D) 1 Siflet (I) III Mixture (C & F)   8 Clarinet (L) 8 Gt. Posaune (K) 4 Gt. Clarion (K)           SWELL ORGAN (CHAMBER B)   16 Lieblich Bourdon (Q) 8 Geigen Diapason (N) 8 Viola da Gamba (P) 8 Voix Celeste (P) 8 Spitz flute (Q & R) 4 Gemshorn (O) 4 Stopped flute (Q) 2 2/3 Nazard (R) 2 Fifteenth (N) 2 Flageolet (R) 1 3/5 Tierce (P) - V Plein Jeu (O & N) V Harmonics (M & O) 16 Contra Fagotto (T) 8 Cornopean (19) 8 Oboe (T) 8 Vox Humana (V) 4 Clarion (19)   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - You care about security. So do we. http://promotions.yahoo.com/new_mail  
(back) Subject: RE: Compton Extension (Extensive!) From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Sun, 12 Dec 2004 16:11:49 -0000   I don't know if this will help, but here is the specification of the Wolverhampton Civic Hall organ. It currently has 43 ranks giving 102 speaking stops, not including percussions and piano. The list of ranks is given first, but there is no indication of the use of the mutation ranks = in the various mixtures etc. Steve Tovey added the Tibia, Kinura, Krummet and English Horn ranks in the recent rebuild and these are not in Compton's original specification. Compton did however include a Melotone Unit which is no longer used.   Civic Hall Wolverhampton Specification - List of Ranks (43)   Sub-bass 32' Contrabass 16' Bombarde 16'   Salicional 16' Gedeckt 16' Gemshorn 8' Vox Angelica 4' Claribel Flute 8' Flauto Traverso 4' Nazard 2' 2/3'' Tierce 1' 3/5'' Horn 8' Open Diapason 16' Cornet IV Ranks Pausaune 16' Open Diapason 8' Open Diapason 8' Octave 4' Super Octave 2' Stopped Diapason 8' Fourniture Tromba 8' Viola-de-Gamba 16' Double Trumpet 16' Geigen 8' Geigen 4' Fifteenth 2' Celestes 4' Rohr Flote 8' Sesquilatera IV Hautboy 8' Trumpet 8' Tuba 8' Orchestral Oboe 8' Violon Cello 8' Violes Celeste 8' Harmonic Flute 8' Harmonic Flute 4' Clarinet 8' Tibia Clausa 97 Pipes Kinura 61 Pipes Krummet 61 Pipes English Horn 61 Pipes     Console specification   PEDAL   Sub-bass 32' Harmonics of 32' Contra Bass 16' Harmonics of 16' Open Bass 16' Bombarde 16' Salicional 16' Posaune 16' Violone 16' Trumpet 16' Sub-bass 16' Bombarde 8' Bourdon 16' Posaune 8' Quinte 10'2/3'' English Horn 8' Octave 8' Bombarde 4' Salicional 8' Grand Piano 16' Flute 8' Twelfth 5'1/3'' Fifteenth 4' Flute 4' Fourniture IV Ranks Cymbal Tap Triangle Crash Cymbal Bass Drum P Bass Drum F Choir to Pedal Great to Pedal Swell to Pedal Solo to Pedal Solo Octave to Pedal   CHOIR   Contra Salicional 16' Bourdon 16' Violone Cello 8' Open Diapason 8' Gemshorn 8' Tibia Clausa 8' Salicional 8' Vox Angelica 8' Claribel Flute 8' Lieblich Gedeckt 8' Tibia Clausa 4' Salicet 4' Flauto Traverso 4' Lieblich Flote 4' Nazard 2'2/3'' Tibia Clausa 2' Twelfth 2'2/3'' Fifteenth 2' Tierce 1'3/5'' Acuta II Ranks Horn 8' Posaune 8' English Horn 8' Tuba 8' Krummet 8' Kinura 8' Vibraphone 8' Piano 8' Piano 4' Triangle Cymbal Tap Castanets Tambourine Octave Great to Choir Swell to Choir Solo to Choir Tremulant GREAT   Double Open Diapason 16' Violone Cello 8' Open Diapason I 8' Open Diapason II 8' Open Diapason III 8' Stopped Diapason 8' Tibia Clausa 8' Octave 4' Principal 4' Tibia Clausa 4' Tibia Clausa 2' 2/3'' Super Octave 2' Twelfth 2' 2/3" Fifteenth 2' Forniture IV Ranks Piano 16' Piano 8' Piano 4' Contra Posaune 16' Tromba 8' Horn 8' English Horn 8' Krummet 8' Kinura 8' Clarion 4' Glockenspiel 4' Xylophone 4' Tremulant Sub-Octave Octave Solo To Great Swell To Great Choir To Great   SWELL   Violone 16' Geigen 8' Viola de Gamba 8' Viole Celeste 8' Rohr Flute 8' Geigen Octave 4' Viola 4' Fifteenth 2' Mixture IV Ranks Double Trumpet 16' Trumpet 8' Clarion 4' Hautboy 8' Sub-Octave Octave Tremulant Solo To Swell   Will Light Coventry UK   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Colin Mitchell Sent: 12 December 2004 14:35 To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Compton Extension (Extensive!)   Hello,   I've been digging about a bit in my "sin bin" of incomplete notes and collected rubbish, hoping that I might discover the true facts about John Compton extension organs.   Unfortunately, I simply have neither the time nor the inclination to turn it into a major thesis for the list, but I am able to "shed a little light" on the skill of John Compton as a builder of very musical instruments and something of a pioneer in synthetic tone production.   John Compton was enormously innovative, and worked to a very high standard indeed. Although he was apprenticed to Hathaway (not a well known builder in the UK), his interest must have been kindled by the time he spent with Brindley & Foster of Sheffield; a company who took pneumatic actions and console controls to new heights of complexity.   Of course, all this corresponded with the growing science and engineering of electricity and electronics, and he was always innovative enough to include all sorts of gadgets, diaphonic devices, luminous stop heads, stop keys, combination actions and low voltage direct electric actions running from dynamos attached to the blower units.   In fact, Compton was fairly unique in the history of organ-building in the UK; for he adopted the Hope-Jones unit system which was to become frowned upon by "serious" musicians and many of his peers.   The point of departure came during the war years, when he spent time in Italy; happily hacking away at organ pipes in rural churches with a view to creating all sorts of novel tone colour synthesis.   The ever fertile mind sprang into action, and the knowledge gained from his acts of vandalism in Italy, was put to good use; with much the same morality and in the same paradoxical way that the death of a child might benefit medical science!   I have tried to find examples of instruments which reflect his best designs, but sadly, all the sources seem to list nothing but the actual stops on the consoles, rather than the derivations from specific pipe units.   Nevertheless, I came across a few pieces of paper, which seem to show that John Compton was well aware of the problems inherent in using unison ranks as the source of derived mutations; which is what I was hoping to show when I first suggested that I could contribute something to the discussion; with scant regard to the time factor and with a certain cavalier disregard of my own ignorance and bad memory.   Before going into all the business of derivations and pipe units, it might be as well to point out, that at the peak of the Compton business (a huge factory in North London, which had a vast staff turning out cinema and church organs at an alarming rate) John Compton re-built many, many existing organs very successfully; leaving them with huge consoles and not at all a bad sound.   The re-build are NOT true unit organs, for Compton invariably inherited independent Swell Organs and also Choir or Solo organs. Bangor Cathedral is a fine example, where the unit principle does not play a massive part in the scheme of things; the original Hill organ being quite a substantial instrument. The same is also true of the very large instrument of Hull City Hall, on which I used to practise regularly. This 184 (?) stop beast was a very large, almost entirely straight, slider-chest Forster & Andrews (Hull) organ. Although Compton added a Diaphone, Tibia and other units, in addition to percussion registers, the organ remained largely a Forster & Andrews, with the benefit of the Compton "touch".   It is in the entirely new organs, rather than the many re-builds of existing organs, that the true genius of Compton emerges. However, I must qualify my comments before continuing further, because as yet, I have singularly failed to connect what I know that John Compton knew, with an actual example which can demonstrate the point.   However, undaunted as always, and throwing true scholarship to the wind (what's new!), the following will, I hope, illustrate the more advanced "theory" of Compton unit organ building, even though I am not sure whether it was ever actually realised.   From only 20 to 22 units, Compton was able to create a 100 stop instrument of considerable musical worth, built ENTIRELY on the unit principle and utilising split chanbers which, by necessity, would both be enclosed in their own swell boxes.   Let's look at a typical (theoretical?) list of units specified, as follows:-   The various units are marked 'A' through 'V'   FIRST CHAMBER (Enclosed)   Open Diapason I 16' (A) Open Diapason II 5 1/3 (B) (merges with C below > 5.1/3ft) Open Diapason III 16' (C) Quint 5 1/3 (D) Mixture II (independent unisons only) (E) Salicional 16' (F) Stopped Flute 32' (G) Chimney Flute 5 1/3' (H) (merges with G below 5.1/3 Open Flute 2 2/3 (I) (merges with G below 2.2/3ft) Posaune 32' (J) Trumpet 16' (K) Clarinet 16' (L)   SECOND CHAMBER (Enclosed)   Geigen 8' (M) Gemshorn 2 2/3' (N) (merges with M below 2.2/3ft) Gamba 16' (O) Celeste - tierce 8' (P) (Tierce tuned just - Celeste > is a compromise) Bourdon 16' (Q) Spitz Flute 2 2/3' (R) (merges with Q below > 2.2/3ft) Cornopean 16' (S) Oboe 16' (T) Vox Humana 16' (V) -----------------   This is clearly a very clever use of units, for the Tierce (derived from the Celeste) is 'just tuned,' with a resultant compromise in the tuning of the Celeste itself.   However, a seperate Quint unit is a common source of mutation ranks in the various "Mixtures".   Add to this the fact that some of the Mixtures had independent unison ranks, and the natural shortcomings of the extension principle are largely circumnavigated, if not entirely eliminated.   What sort of spcification can be derived from these units?   For the purposes of compression, I shall ignore the fact that a large Compton extension organ has a Pedal division which just borrows more or less everything available at 32ft pitch and above, but may include a seperate Diaphone unit as well as switched Harmonics of 32ft and 16ft pitches gathered from almost everywhere! We therefore don't need to dwell on the Pedal Organs, which should be fairly obvious.   Similarly, on the true Unit Organs (rather than the rebuilt instruments), the Solo and (any) Bombarde division (as at Wakefield Cathedral.....5 manuals) would simply duplex stops from other departments to good effect. To turn around a popular catch-phrase, "What you see is definitely NOT what you get!"   Sticking purely to the manual division of Great, Swell and Choir for the purposes of this discussion, this is how the various units might be utilised (and may well have been on an actual instrument).   It is especially interesting that the Unison Octaves, (both upwards and downwards) avoid missing notes very cleverly, but equally impressive, is the way that ranks merge at lower pitches, thus reducing the number of pipes required. The same trick is used at the highest pitches, where the ear is relatively insensitive to pitch and fine tuning. The Tierce, for instance, may dry up well before the top of the keyboard, and the tinkling Cymbel sounds might well be derived from the highest pipes of a Salicional rank.   This clearly demonstrates that John Compton was acutely aware of tone-colour synthesis and the psychology of "hearing".   For those wo may wish to study this in depth, I would suggest that they cut and paste the Unit List above, and draw it down as an aid to comparison and derivations.   All fascinating stuff, and I'm sorry that I have yet to make a connection between Compton theory and Compton practice.   Does anyone know if the seperate Quints were ever utilised in an actual Compton organ?     GREAT ORGAN (FIRST CHAMBER)     16 Double Open Diapason (C) 16 Bourdon (G) 8 Open Diapason I (A) 8 Open Diapason II (B & C) 8 Hohl flute (G) 8 Stopped Diapason (I) 5 1/3 Quint (D) 4 Principal (B) 4 Stopped Flute (H) 2 2/3 Twelfth (D) 2 Fifteenth (C) - IV Fourniture (D & E) III Cymbal (D & E) 8 Posaune (K) 4 Clarion (K)       CHOIR ORGAN ( FIRST CHAMBER)     16 Contra Salicional (F) 8 Open Diapason (C) 8 Salicional (F) 8 Bourdon (G) 4 Salicet (F) 4 Block flute (G& I) 4 Chimney Flute (H) 2 Salicetina (F) 2 Piccolo (G) 1 1/3 Quint (D) 1 Siflet (I) III Mixture (C & F)   8 Clarinet (L) 8 Gt. Posaune (K) 4 Gt. Clarion (K)           SWELL ORGAN (CHAMBER B)   16 Lieblich Bourdon (Q) 8 Geigen Diapason (N) 8 Viola da Gamba (P) 8 Voix Celeste (P) 8 Spitz flute (Q & R) 4 Gemshorn (O) 4 Stopped flute (Q) 2 2/3 Nazard (R) 2 Fifteenth (N) 2 Flageolet (R) 1 3/5 Tierce (P) - V Plein Jeu (O & N) V Harmonics (M & O) 16 Contra Fagotto (T) 8 Cornopean (19) 8 Oboe (T) 8 Vox Humana (V) 4 Clarion (19)   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - You care about security. So do we. http://promotions.yahoo.com/new_mail   ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" 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(back) Subject: Possible Christmas choir anthem From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sun, 12 Dec 2004 10:57:19 -0600   While up on Sunday morning eating lasagna for breakfast and listening to "Music and the Spoken Word" I heard the MoTabs do a very simple and moving arrangement of the Austrian carol "Still, still, still". Although the arranger was not disclosed, I know that general information regarding the music broadcast can be obtained from their website.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Motab playlist From: <DudelK@aol.com> Date: Sun, 12 Dec 2004 13:01:30 EST   The playlists can be located at: http://www.musicandthespokenword.org/musicsheet.htm   I only saw the first few minutes of this morning's broadcast since I had a = 7 a.m. service, but I believe it was from last year's Christmas concert, = which is being carried on PBS on Dec. 22 and on additional dates in some = localities.  
(back) Subject: Re: Possible Christmas choir anthem From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Sun, 12 Dec 2004 12:29:18 -0600   A very moving setting of "Still, Still, Still" for SATB and organ that I discovered over 25 years ago is that by Robert Wetzler. Augsburg publication, IIRC, and probably long out of print. Beautiful in its simplicity, no lily-gilding.   Bob Lind   ----- Original Message ----- From: Glenda <gksjd85@direcway.com> To: 'PipeChat' <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, December 12, 2004 10:57 AM Subject: Possible Christmas choir anthem     > While up on Sunday morning eating lasagna for breakfast and listening to > "Music and the Spoken Word" I heard the MoTabs do a very simple and > moving arrangement of the Austrian carol "Still, still, still". > Although the arranger was not disclosed, I know that general information > regarding the music broadcast can be obtained from their website. > > Glenda Sutton > gksjd85@direcway.com > > > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > > > > > _____________________________________________________ > This message scanned for viruses by CoreComm >    
(back) Subject: battle hymn of the republic From: "wesley" <wcool@bellsouth.net> Date: Sun, 12 Dec 2004 15:13:51 -0500   Anyone know of a good arrangement of this piece for organ? thanks          
(back) Subject: Re: battle hymn of the republic From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Sun, 12 Dec 2004 15:15:22 EST   In a message dated 12/12/04 12:14:43 PM Pacific Standard Time, wcool@bellsouth.net writes:   > Anyone know of a good arrangement of this piece for organ?   i've never known a good arrangement of that piece for anything...  
(back) Subject: Re: battle hymn of the republic From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sun, 12 Dec 2004 12:48:53 -0800   Get a good pianist and play the Wilhousky choral arrangement with the organ taking the vocal parts and the piano taking the accompaniment. We once did that as a CARILLON duet between the towers of the Episcopal church and the Presbyterian church on Corondo Island, CA, home to many retired military, and where July 4 is a Holy Day of Obligation (chuckle). We had a phone line between the two churches so we could count aloud and keep together. It was GREAT fun!   Cheers,   Bud   PS - be sure you play the slushy TTBB verse ("In the beauty of the lilies") on MASSED strings and celestes (chuckle) with lots of improvised harp arpeggios on the piano (grin)   BlueeyedBear@aol.com wrote:   > In a message dated 12/12/04 12:14:43 PM Pacific Standard Time, > wcool@bellsouth.net writes: > >> Anyone know of a good arrangement of this piece for organ? > > > > i've never known a good arrangement of that piece for anything...