PipeChat Digest #5000 - Wednesday, December 15, 2004
 
RE: Women's organ shoes
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Haskell
  by "Ed Steltzer" <steltzer@gwi.net>
Scott Foppiano CD
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: Women's organ shoes
  by "Adrianne Schutt" <maybe@pipcom.com>
Re: Women's organ shoes
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
Re: Women's organ shoes
  by "Shelley Culver" <culverse@westminster.edu>
Re: Women's organ shoes
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
RE: Women's organ shoes
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Moller, Phila. Convention Hall
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <wvanpelt@erols.com>
RE: Women's organ shoes
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
RE: The Queen and the Civil Way
  by "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca>
Re: Women's organ shoes
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
RE: Women's organ shoes
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
RE: Blenheim Palace (Willis)
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
Re: Philadelphia Convention Hall Moller
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com>
RE: Blenheim Palace
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
 

(back) Subject: RE: Women's organ shoes From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Tue, 14 Dec 2004 20:46:02 -0600   Thanks, Steve, but I'm a bit more fashion conscious than that. I was wondering if it was a faux pas for women to wear "organ pumps" (i.e., sans straps).   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Stephen Best   For the durability reasons you mention, some of my female students buy men's organ shoes. The only problem that occurs is when there isn't a man's size small enough for a woman with tiny feet.        
(back) Subject: Re: Haskell From: "Ed Steltzer" <steltzer@gwi.net> Date: Tue, 14 Dec 2004 21:45:15 -0500   Hi list! in reply to Keith (below) I bought a 16' Haskelled Violone 12 pipes from an organ (Estey, IIRC) removed from a church in Framingham = MA (Union Congregational?) back in about 1975. The longest pipe 16' CCC was about 9 1/2 feet long overall; quite a saving in length. I built a few more Haskell pipes from an old 8' Dulciana to extend the rank. It = sounded great with a real bite, and did indeed "mimic a 16' Diapason" when used with the Bourdon. It was running on 3 3/4 inches wind, and was very stable; largest pipe about 5 1/2" diameter IIRC.   I frequently wish I still had that rank, but time goes on, and less space (and energy) these days!   Ed, in Maine   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Keith Zimmerman" <kwzimmerman@alltel.net> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, December 14, 2004 4:16 PM Subject: Haskell     > List, > > I've asked this question before, but I don't remember if I got a = specific > answer: > > The specific question is how short can one make a 16' pitch Viole or > Dulciana pipe by haskelling it? > > While surfing around, I noticed that Kegg built an organ for FUMC, > Winnsboro, SC. Apparently, they felt that a 16' flue was needed, but there > wasn't space for a 16' Principal. They extended the Viole down an = octave > using haskell basses. Apparently, this gave a little "something" to the > pedal that could not be provided by the 16' Bourdon alone. When used along > with the 16' Bourdon, it would mimic a 16' Diapason. > > I'm trying to apply that to a home situation. That's why I wonder how much > height can be saved by haskelling. > > I was intrigued by Seb's inclusion of the reed box to complete the 16' > octave for the Dulciana in his Alexander Chapel organ. Perhaps this = would > be a more cost-effective solution for a home project. > > Thanks, > Keith > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >    
(back) Subject: Scott Foppiano CD From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Tue, 14 Dec 2004 20:48:53 -0600   Lo, after MANY weeks of being backordered, today I finally received Scott Foppiano's "Back to the Black" CD from OHS. Scott is playing the "Rhinestone Barton " (actually built by Wangerin), and he does a fabulous job playing a fabulous instrument!   Now if OHS can just get the other CD by Scott I ordered!   Good job, Scott!   Dennis Steckley Lover of Cats, Pipe Organs & 1940-65 Sewing Machines    
(back) Subject: Re: Women's organ shoes From: "Adrianne Schutt" <maybe@pipcom.com> Date: Tue, 14 Dec 2004 21:52:38 -0500   At 08:32 PM 14/12/2004 -0600, Glenda wrote: >No, this is not the age-old discussion. I have noticed that women's >organ shoes have a strap across them. Why is this, and is it absolutely >necessary?   It's easier to buy a shoe with a strap and remove it at home than =   buy strapless and fix it. Finding matching material, making 2 identical straps, and getting em attached right....you'd have to REALLY love the shoes, and come from a family of cobblers.   I have trouble keeping any low-cut strapless pump on my foot, = even just walking around. It's possible, but it requires concious thought and = a stiff gait that I'm not thrilled with. If I went near pedals in them, it sure wouldn't be purty. Maybe those amazing gals who can glide around = in stilettos like they're running through a meadow barefoot could pull off....but not me.   Have fun! Ad ;->      
(back) Subject: Re: Women's organ shoes From: <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Tue, 14 Dec 2004 21:55:27 EST   Hello gksjd85@direcway.com,     In reference to your comment: Thanks, Steve, but I'm a bit more fashion conscious than that. I was wondering if it was a faux pas for women to wear "organ pumps" (i.e., sans straps).   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~   The BEST pair of organ shoes I have is a low, wedge-heeled pump with = rubber soles. No straps. I guess you should try playing sans straps, and if it =   feels ok, go strapless!   Victoria  
(back) Subject: Re: Women's organ shoes From: "Shelley Culver" <culverse@westminster.edu> Date: Tue, 14 Dec 2004 21:57:12 -0500   Super glue, Glenda. Super glue. I've forgotten how many times I've super glued my organ shoes back together.   Maybe the strap is there just in case they maybe might fall off? I don't know.   Shelley   >>> gksjd85@direcway.com 12/14/04 9:32 PM >>> No, this is not the age-old discussion. I have noticed that women's organ shoes have a strap across them. Why is this, and is it absolutely necessary?   Of course, there is a reason for the question. Yesterday just as I was changing shoes to warm up for my lesson, I stepped on and ripped off one of the straps. Inasmuch as there isn't a shoe repairman in this area, I was thinking of making the other shoe match.   I'm saving the gold ones for special occasions, threw out the first pair I had, and the second pair has a damaged latch. I'm rough on shoes.   Sitting here trying to develop a taste for Chivas and water,   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com           ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>      
(back) Subject: Re: Women's organ shoes From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 14 Dec 2004 19:12:43 -0800 (PST)   Glenda, Tic Tac Toes makes the BEST womens Organ shoes. And other shoes too. They go into all kinds of sizes too. Most of us corpulent women organist = love them because of their extended sizes. LOL. They have a style that is = laced instead of strapped, for women. They've got some snazzy Friday-Go-Dancin' Shoes, too. You bring the Chivas = Regal...I'll bring the Malibu (Doucaine?)   TDH       From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Send holiday email and support a worthy cause. Do good.
(back) Subject: RE: Women's organ shoes From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Tue, 14 Dec 2004 21:10:41 -0600   This was a fairly new pair of Tic Tac Toes I ruined.     Glenda Sutton   gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of T.Desiree' Hines Sent: Tuesday, December 14, 2004 9:13 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Women's organ shoes       Glenda,     Tic Tac Toes makes the BEST womens Organ shoes. And other shoes too.   They go into all kinds of sizes too. Most of us corpulent women organist love them because of their extended sizes. LOL. They have a style that is laced instead of strapped, for women.        
(back) Subject: Moller, Phila. Convention Hall From: "William T. Van Pelt" <wvanpelt@erols.com> Date: Tue, 14 Dec 2004 22:25:21 -0500   Hi, Stan,   The recording you recall of the Moller in the Philadelphia Convention Hall as played by Tom Hazleton and by Michael Stairs is part of the Organ Historical Society's 4-CD set, Historic Organs of Phiadelphia, OHS-96, available from http://www.ohscatalog.org   Bill  
(back) Subject: RE: Women's organ shoes From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 14 Dec 2004 19:29:11 -0800 (PST)   oh my! Im sorry to hear that. But, if you wanted to try them again, they do have = lace-up styles.     Glenda <gksjd85@direcway.com> wrote:   This was a fairly new pair of Tic Tac Toes I ruined.     Glenda Sutton   gksjd85@direcway.com       -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of = T.Desiree' Hines Sent: Tuesday, December 14, 2004 9:13 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Women's organ shoes         Glenda,         Tic Tac Toes makes the BEST womens Organ shoes. And other shoes too.     They go into all kinds of sizes too. Most of us corpulent women organist = love them because of their extended sizes. LOL. They have a style that is = laced instead of strapped, for women.               --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? The all-new My Yahoo! =96 What will yours do?
(back) Subject: RE: The Queen and the Civil Way From: "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 00:13:24 -0500   That information may be mixed-up with a rumour(that may be fact)that the last King of France (Louis IV...forgive me if the numbers wrong)had bought = a large estate somewhere along the banks of the Susquehanna river in Pennsylvania or Virginia in the event he needed to or could escape the French Revolution.   Btw, up here in Canada some consider the US Civil war of 1861-65, as the = US Second Civil War. The First Civil War was what Americans called their War = of Independence. For the displaced "loyalists" that left everything in the 13 colonies, returning to Britain or fleeing to British North America (eventually, Canada) to remain subjects of the crown, the war was a = civilian war that they lost.   AjMead   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois Sent: Tuesday, December 14, 2004 11:31 AM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: The Queen and the Civil Way     I can't verify it off hand, but my understanding is that Queen Elizabeth owned a large plantation in Mississippi. Whether she does or not doesn't bother me either way........no reason why she couldn't if she chose to.   I suspect the real estate holdings of Britain's royal family are extensive and worldwide. She probably has many properties she doesn't even know she owns--they are just pieces on an inventory list.   Re: The Civil War: My understanding is that in the south it is sometimes referred to as "The War of Northern Aggression."   Dennis Steckley   "Don't cry because it's over. Smile because it happened."--Dr. Seuss         ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>        
(back) Subject: Re: Women's organ shoes From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 00:13:40 -0500   I'd be surprised if Organmaster wouldn't make a shoe as small as you = wanted it. I know someone who was having trouble getting fit and they finally = had her trace her foot on a piece of paper and mail it in, and they made her a =   shoe that fit. If they can make a custom shape, it seems they could probably make a custom size. The men's shoe seems a good idea (if you do this, you might want to ask about widths too)   As for the straps, dunno! I'd say try it out without the strap, see how = it feels before ripping the other one off. I have a feeling, though, that it'll feel a little loose and affect your confidence. The strap is there, =   of course, because the top of the shoe is open much further forward than = the men's shoe, which is covered aft of the arch and uses laces. (Granted, = I'm always terrified of them untying in the middle of a piece, but it hasn't happened yet).   Andy (who has definitely never tried a woman's organ shoe... no intention = to) ;)     On Tue, 14 Dec 2004 21:41:01 -0500, Stephen Best wrote > Glenda -- > > For the durability reasons you mention, some of my female students > buy men's organ shoes. The only problem that occurs is when there > isn't a man's size small enough for a woman with tiny feet. > > Steve Best in Utica, NY > > Glenda wrote: > > >No, this is not the age-old discussion. I have noticed that women's > >organ shoes have a strap across them. Why is this, and is it = absolutely > >necessary? > > > >Of course, there is a reason for the question. Yesterday just as I was > >changing shoes to warm up for my lesson, I stepped on and ripped off = one > >of the straps. Inasmuch as there isn't a shoe repairman in this area, = I > >was thinking of making the other shoe match. > > > >I'm saving the gold ones for special occasions, threw out the first = pair > >I had, and the second pair has a damaged latch. I'm rough on shoes. > > > >Sitting here trying to develop a taste for Chivas and water, > > > >Glenda Sutton > >gksjd85@direcway.com     A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: RE: Women's organ shoes From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 00:22:53 -0500   Woops, sorry Glenda, hadn't read this yet. Um, I guess never mind on the men's shoe thing! (though honestly I think it would look fine... its not = as though most women's organ shoes are all that flattering!) ;)   Anyhow, if the shoe still feels tight enough to play properly sans strap, = I don't see what would be wrong with it. It would look more normal, = actually, than normal organ shoes.   Andy   On Tue, 14 Dec 2004 20:46:02 -0600, Glenda wrote > Thanks, Steve, but I'm a bit more fashion conscious than that. I was > wondering if it was a faux pas for women to wear "organ pumps" (i.e., > sans straps). >     A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: RE: Blenheim Palace (Willis) From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 00:49:22 -0500   There is a 1930's smallish (but kick-ass) 3 manual Casavant near here. See http://www.marykeanechapel.com:16080/organ/ for the stoplist.   It is interesting... every time a British organist comes to play it, they fall in love with it. I wonder if it is because it is what a Willis organ =   should have been? On paper, it has many of the characteristics I'm = hearing about Willis organs (the nomenclature is all French, but as we've = discussed before this means little, and I do not really know what a Cavaille-Coll is =   supposed to sound like), yet it sounds just gorgeous, and is great for all =   sorts of things (Bach being its weak point, but I've heard clever organists... Roger Sayer especially, one of the British organists who couldn't get over the beauty of this organ, get around this nicely). I've =   never actually heard it used to accompany a choir, since it has been used only for organ recitals since the church closed many years ago. (It is = now owned by the nearby shaker museum, though the chapel clearly is completely =   unrelated to the shakers other than location), but it would be very good = at it. It does accompany a congregation very well, but between the bottom- heavy stoplist and the reverberant accoustics one has to be careful not to =   turn it into mud. It is quite possible without the reeds (as well as = with).   The stoplist fails to mention that all the standard super- and sub- = couplers are present, including to pedal from all 3 manual divisions.   This organ, with Thomas Brown at the console, produced the best rendition = of Vierne's "Carillon de Westminster" I've heard yet. Roger Sayer did it = too, and it was just as awesome that time too.   Andy     On Wed, 15 Dec 2004 15:19:04 +1300, TheShieling wrote > >This comes as a surprise to me--I've always thought that Willis really > rated amongst 19th-century English builders. I've never played one nor > heard one in person, though. > Care to elaborate as to why? Enlighten me... > > Not being an Englishman, but living some 13000 miles away, I'll > still have the courage to jump in from my (not extensive) knowledge > of Willis organs. > > One of the main problems is that they were not really designed > either for accompanying singing or for playing the great literature > of the organ. The Great diapason chorus was often a large soggy mess, > with no singing quality or clarity to it. Further, any upperwork > was very limited and inevitably had a 17th in it. Too, the further > up you went, the more the stuff became stringy in tone. Adding the > Great reeds merely obliterated the diapason chorus. With that, you > HAD to have reeds on for anything like full organ, that is unless > you wanted to make the organ sound like a large "English" full Swell > of 16ft reed and other stuff. And again, the Choir tended to be a > tiddly collection of flutes, a dabble of stringy stops, and some > solo reeds - useless as a Chair, or Positive, and there was no > upperwork there beyond some flutey mutations at Nazard, Piccolo and > Tierce pitches. The Pedal was loaded with 16fts, but everything else > was extension or borrow, there was no clarity and virtually no > upperwork of any sort - maybe sometimes an extn 4ft Principal or a > mutation, but only rarely. And again, the pressures were often so > high that the organ sounded blatant and obscene in the building, > i.e. too damned loud, and literally painful on the ears. And again, > you got a Willis organ, always, with apparently no effort on the > part of the builder to relate either the specification or the > purpose of the instrument to the building. > > When Willis got hold of the Southwark Cathedral Lewis masterpiece, > he upped the pressures all over the place and made the organ awful. > At their very fine restoration, H&H put everything back the way it > had been, and the organ became a truly wonderful instrument again. > At Westminster Cathedral, the Apse organ is certainly Lewis-inspired > and voiced, but I'm not fond of the noisy behemoth at the west end: > oh yeah, sort-of impressive in large-scale 19thC French works, but > not what I'd call a useful organ. My organ teacher, Maxwell Fernie, > Organist there when George Malcolm was Dir.Music, told me how he > often got so very frustrated with the organ. Max finally ditched the > place to come back to NZ, sick of the whole Willis scene. > > I've often played the handful of Willis organs in NZ, but apart from > their size, I'm not at all impressed with the voicing, the scaling, > the balance, the design, any of that. Dunedin Cathedral had a 3/46 > Willis from 1919, so that probably had Lewis voicers working on it. > Certainly, it was a big sound and a Willis design, but much more of > a Lewis tone. It's since been rebuilt and enlarged to a 4m by the > South Island Organ Co., with all sorts of upperwork added, but to me > the organ is just "a large organ" now and hasn't the quality of tone > it had. As it was when built, it was probably amongst the very last > handful of organs to have had Lewis tone in the Great Diapasons. > Colin Mitchell will relate the story of the Willis takeover better > than me. > > I played a 3m Willis organ in Cambridge a few years ago. I couldn't = believe > the strident and obscene BLATT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! of the organ in that smallish > church. 10 days later I played the similar-sized Lewis in > Kelvingrove, Glasgow - and was entranced at the feeling of rightness > and musicality that were there. I played a 2m Willis in a City of > London church - and recoiled at the nastiness of the voicing and, > again, the lack of balance and subtlety. Not two weeks later, I > played a Snetzler enlarged by Norman & Beard - and was delighted at > the sheer loveliness of the sound. > > I suppose people have been taken in a bit by the noise and bombast of > Willis, and the "effect" of choruses of reeds coupled, but they're = little > use for accompanying singing or playing almost any of the organ's > own music - and the sound becomes wearisome even to an organ > enthusiast like me. > > And none of this is to talk about mechanism, reliability, any of > those things, as they're a different issue. > > Ross > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related > topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>       A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Philadelphia Convention Hall Moller From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 16:49:00 +0800   It would seem so much more practical to find a copy Dave Frishberg's, My At= torney Bernie and make a fugue out of it.   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Roy Kersey" <rkersey@tds.net>   > Can anyone help me remove my tongue from so far in my cheek?=20=20 > I am also looking for the music to the "Lament of the Bean=20 > Counters" which I know was originally for harpsichord and solo=20 > voice, but which I would like to perform on the piano at home. <BG> > Best Wishes, > Roy Kersey   <whole lotta snipping goin' on...>   -- Jan Nijhuis nijhuis@email.com   --=20 ___________________________________________________________ Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm    
(back) Subject: RE: Blenheim Palace From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 09:18:39 -0000   You're quite safe Colin, my knowledge of organs is so small that I = wouldn't know a Willis from a Harrison from a R&D - so I'm not getting into a fight over this one!   Will Light Coventry UK   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Colin Mitchell Sent: 14 December 2004 23:13 To: PipeChat Subject: RE: Blenheim Palace   SNIP In fact, did Willis III ever build a decent instrument?   Am I alone in hating every single one I have ever heard?   OMG! Will Light will be after me with a hammer!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK