PipeChat Digest #5001 - Wednesday, December 15, 2004
 
RE: Blenheim Palace (Willis)
  by "alantaylor1" <alantaylor1@members.v21.co.uk>
Philadelphia Convention Hall Moller
  by "Will Scarboro" <whs1325@yahoo.com>
MP3 Files
  by "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com>
Jardine
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Re: Jardine
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
RE: Blenheim Palace
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Superglue
  by "David Baker" <dgb137@mac.com>
Re: I superglued my leg back together!
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: I superglued my hand back together!
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: Blenheim Palace
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
Re: Jardine
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
RE: Blenheim Palace (Willis)
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com>
Re: Jardine
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Willis organs
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Westminster Cathedral
  by "alantaylor1" <alantaylor1@members.v21.co.uk>
RE: Blenheim Palace
  by "Mr. R.E. Malone" <remalone@btinternet.com>
RE: Blenheim Palace
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
 

(back) Subject: RE: Blenheim Palace (Willis) From: "alantaylor1" <alantaylor1@members.v21.co.uk> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 10:33:31 -0000   Ross's posting does come as rather a surprise to me. As I think it would = to at least half of the UK's cathedral organists. As at least half, = probably more, of the UK's cathedral organs are Willis. This includes the main section of the St Paul's cathedral, London, organ. These organs are cherished and loved and really do not fit into any of the comments = posted by Ross.   Then, when I think of the beautiful Father Willis organs, which again, couldn=92t be further from the description given by Ross... Well I = wonder if he hasn't become confused with his makers. Especially as I cannot think = of any 2 manual Willis organ in a City of London parish church.   But, you can judge for yourselves. There are numerous recordings of = Willis organs. Including; Blenheim Palace, St Paul's cathedral, Westminster cathedral, Liverpool cathedral, Hereford cathedral, Farm street Jesuit church. And many, many more.=20   Alan London   Not being an Englishman, but living some 13000 miles away, I'll still = have the courage to jump in from my (not extensive) knowledge of Willis = organs.=20   One of the main problems is that they were not really designed either = for accompanying singing or for playing the great literature of the organ. = The Great diapason chorus was often a large soggy mess, with no singing = quality or clarity to it. Further, any upperwork was very limited and inevitably = had a 17th in it. Too, the further up you went, the more the stuff became stringy in tone. Adding the Great reeds merely obliterated the diapason chorus. With that, you HAD to have reeds on for anything like full = organ, that is unless you wanted to make the organ sound like a large "English" full Swell of 16ft reed and other stuff. And again, the Choir tended to = be a tiddly collection of flutes, a dabble of stringy stops, and some solo = reeds - useless as a Chair, or Positive, and there was no upperwork there = beyond some flutey mutations at Nazard, Piccolo and Tierce pitches. The Pedal = was loaded with 16fts, but everything else was extension or borrow, there = was no clarity and virtually no upperwork of any sort - maybe sometimes an extn = 4ft Principal or a mutation, but only rarely. And again, the pressures were often so high that the organ sounded blatant and obscene in the = building, i.e. too damned loud, and literally painful on the ears. And again, you = got a Willis organ, always, with apparently no effort on the part of the = builder to relate either the specification or the purpose of the instrument to = the building.   When Willis got hold of the Southwark Cathedral Lewis masterpiece, he = upped the pressures all over the place and made the organ awful. At their very fine restoration, H&H put everything back the way it had been, and the = organ became a truly wonderful instrument again. At Westminster Cathedral, the Apse organ is certainly Lewis-inspired and voiced, but I'm not fond of = the noisy behemoth at the west end: oh yeah, sort-of impressive in = large-scale 19thC French works, but not what I'd call a useful organ. My organ = teacher, Maxwell Fernie, Organist there when George Malcolm was Dir.Music, told = me how he often got so very frustrated with the organ. Max finally ditched = the place to come back to NZ, sick of the whole Willis scene.=20   I've often played the handful of Willis organs in NZ, but apart from = their size, I'm not at all impressed with the voicing, the scaling, the = balance, the design, any of that. Dunedin Cathedral had a 3/46 Willis from 1919, = so that probably had Lewis voicers working on it. Certainly, it was a big = sound and a Willis design, but much more of a Lewis tone. It's since been = rebuilt and enlarged to a 4m by the South Island Organ Co., with all sorts of upperwork added, but to me the organ is just "a large organ" now and = hasn't the quality of tone it had. As it was when built, it was probably = amongst the very last handful of organs to have had Lewis tone in the Great Diapasons. Colin Mitchell will relate the story of the Willis takeover better than me.=20   I played a 3m Willis organ in Cambridge a few years ago. I couldn't = believe the strident and obscene BLATT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! of the organ in that = smallish church. 10 days later I played the similar-sized Lewis in Kelvingrove, Glasgow - and was entranced at the feeling of rightness and musicality = that were there. I played a 2m Willis in a City of London church - and = recoiled at the nastiness of the voicing and, again, the lack of balance and subtlety. Not two weeks later, I played a Snetzler enlarged by Norman & Beard - and was delighted at the sheer loveliness of the sound.=20   I suppose people have been taken in a bit by the noise and bombast of Willis, and the "effect" of choruses of reeds coupled, but they're = little use for accompanying singing or playing almost any of the organ's own = music - and the sound becomes wearisome even to an organ enthusiast like me.   And none of this is to talk about mechanism, reliability, any of those things, as they're a different issue.   Ross     ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>     --=20 No virus found in this incoming message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.296 / Virus Database: 265.5.3 - Release Date: 14/12/2004 =20   --=20 No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.296 / Virus Database: 265.5.3 - Release Date: 14/12/2004 =20    
(back) Subject: Philadelphia Convention Hall Moller From: "Will Scarboro" <whs1325@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 04:42:48 -0800 (PST)   Dear Lists, I am saddened by the loss of this historic building and the removal of the = Moller. This organ was the organ that started my interest in Municipal = Organs. But, at least the organ is being saved. This building has been = under threat of demolision for over ten years and it was thought for a = long time that the organ would be going down with the building. The Convention Hall Moller is a heroic 87 rank instrument speaking on 10, = 15, and 20 inch wind. The organ speaks towards the stage and the sound is = reflected to the audience via a tone chute. It is because of this = arrangement that the wind pressures and scalings are so huge; and it works = in the room. This has to be one of Moller's best organs. The Great is = probably the most complete of any I have seen from this period. The Pedal = is massive and contains Mollers first 32' metal reed. It is more sucessful = in that room as a classical organ then a theatre organ. The Artiste Roll = player is amazing. I hope it will find a home. But it now joins the list of other municipal = organs in storage. Wherever it goes the room will have to be big to handle = the amount of sound that this organ puts out. Will Scarboro American Municipal Pipe Organ Research Project http://home.comcast.net/~whscarboro/   --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Send a seasonal email greeting and help others. Do good.
(back) Subject: MP3 Files From: "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 05:38:11 -0800 (PST)   For those of you that are interested, I have put last Thursday's recital = up on my web page. Some files are large, and may take a few minutes to = load up. Thanks, let me know if there are any problems. To see them, go to www.scottmontgomerymusic.net/listeningpage.htm     Scott Montgomery 619 W Church St Champaign, IL 61820 217-390-0158 www.ScottMontgomeryMusic.net  
(back) Subject: Jardine From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 09:02:39 -0800   Just was offered to broker sale of a turn of the century Jardine unit organ. Looks like 4 - 5 ranks, even an oboe! 2 manuals, pedal. It's in maintained playing condition. Very sweet sound. Original stencilled pipes .I have no idea of its market value. any thoughts out there? Sebastian? Email me privately for pictures and other info.   John V  
(back) Subject: Re: Jardine From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 08:25:37 -0600 (Central Standard Time)   John Vanderlee wrote to Pipechat: -------Original Message------- From: PipeChat Date: 12/15/2004 08:14:43 AM To: PipeChat Subject: Jardine > Just was offered to broker sale of a turn of the century Jardine unit > organ. <snip> > I have no idea of its market value. any thoughts out there? > Sebastian? Perhaps the Organ Clearing House could render assistance in terms of Appraisal, especially since it's a vintage instrument. Of course, we ALL know that it's like anything else: the value is whatever the buyer will pay for it! Unfortunately, "experienced" instruments, with some notable exceptions, don't fetch much -if anything at all. Faithfully, Richard Schneider (Who has a few instruments of his own to "peddle", if anyone is = interested. . .)  
(back) Subject: RE: Blenheim Palace From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 06:30:12 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Well, it started off as a Lewis did it not, under the auspices of John Courage, of the family that paid for the instrument, with Dupre acting as consultant?   Apparently, some of the earliest pipework is distinctly Lewis.   What is wonderful about that organ anyway?   It makes a lot of noise, but I find it awfully dull as compared to, for example, the reputed "Willis 3" at Liverpool. I would admit that is better than that awful instrument Willis installed at St.Giles' Cathedral, Edinburgh, and which has now been mercifully scrapped save for a few pedal pipes.   Sheffield City Hall......dull as ditch-water.   I recall talking to Ian Wells and Prof.Ian Tracey about the Liberpool instrument. Perhaps I can quote Ian Wells' words more or less exactly.   "Willis 3 was a terrible organ-builder. His organs are poor by any standard, and not very well made. For some reason, "he" got it all absolutely right at Liverpool.   Of course, "he" did nothing of the sort! It was left to others who knew better.   Perhaps one should also bear in mind that Willis 3 almost brought the company to bankruptcy, and frankly, much as I like the man, Willis IV didn't fare much better.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       --- alantaylor1 <alantaylor1@members.v21.co.uk> wrote:   > I suppose you count the wonderful Willis 111 organ > at Westminster Cathedral > as a Lewis Colin?       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - 250MB free storage. Do more. Manage less. http://info.mail.yahoo.com/mail_250  
(back) Subject: Superglue From: "David Baker" <dgb137@mac.com> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 09:37:53 -0500   Many, many years ago I dropped something on my foot, causing a similar problem with a toe nail. I went to the emergency room, and they heated up a paperclip and stuck it through the nail to let the blood drain. I was scared s******s, but there was absolutely no pain. There are no nerve endings in toe or fingernails! It may not have been the latest in hi-tech medical care, but it worked. Better, IMHO, than suffering the pain until the nail does come off. David Baker   > I slammed my thumb in the car door maybe 6 weeks back, with the blood > under > the fingernail and all that (it was more pain than I've ever > experienced... > thought about drilling out the nail but never did get the nerve). > <snip>    
(back) Subject: Re: I superglued my leg back together! From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 06:39:56 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   I once "stitched" an oblique cut on my leg, which bled like crazy and went sort of sideways into the flesh....like scalping..... but it was a leg.   The superglue hurt like hell for a while, but it stopped me from bleeding to death (so it seemed at the time) and I didn't suffer any ill effects. I guess the glue melted or got digested eventually, 'cos the skin now moves OK.....couldn't prevent a nasty scar though, short of cosmetic surgery.....but as it's only a leg.   Oh yes! Guess how I cut myself?   I slipped with a large spanner, and tried to cut my leg off with my metal watch-strap!!!!!!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK --- Andy Lawrence <andy@ablorgans.com> wrote:   > Ok, not quite... > > I slammed my thumb in the car door maybe 6 weeks > back, with the blood under > the fingernail and all that   > I drove to the nearest mini-mart and bought some > krazy glue (CA glue) and > glued it back down.     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Send holiday email and support a worthy cause. Do good. http://celebrity.mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: I superglued my hand back together! From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 06:46:11 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   What kind of bridge?   A harmonic bridge? A dental bridge? A whole rail bridge?   Enquiring minds etc.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- Jan Nijhuis <nijhuis@email.com> wrote:   I know my father has used CA to repair a > broken bridge in an emergency situation.       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Send a seasonal email greeting and help others. Do good. http://celebrity.mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: RE: Blenheim Palace From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 08:50:34 -0600   So you're making distinctions between the generations of Willis'--which seems logical to me. Do you unfavorable comments of a previous posting, apply to Father Henry Willis' instruments?   Daniel Hancock Springfield. Missouri   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Colin Mitchell Sent: Wednesday, December 15, 2004 8:30 AM To: PipeChat Subject: RE: Blenheim Palace   Hello,   Well, it started off as a Lewis did it not, under the auspices of John Courage, of the family that paid for the instrument, with Dupre acting as consultant?   Apparently, some of the earliest pipework is distinctly Lewis.   What is wonderful about that organ anyway?   It makes a lot of noise, but I find it awfully dull as compared to, for example, the reputed "Willis 3" at Liverpool. I would admit that is better than that awful instrument Willis installed at St.Giles' Cathedral, Edinburgh, and which has now been mercifully scrapped save for a few pedal pipes.   Sheffield City Hall......dull as ditch-water.   I recall talking to Ian Wells and Prof.Ian Tracey about the Liberpool instrument. Perhaps I can quote Ian Wells' words more or less exactly.   "Willis 3 was a terrible organ-builder. His organs are poor by any standard, and not very well made. For some reason, "he" got it all absolutely right at Liverpool.   Of course, "he" did nothing of the sort! It was left to others who knew better.   Perhaps one should also bear in mind that Willis 3 almost brought the company to bankruptcy, and frankly, much as I like the man, Willis IV didn't fare much better.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK  
(back) Subject: Re: Jardine From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 09:51:07 -0800   > > >Perhaps the Organ Clearing House could render assistance in terms of >Appraisal, especially since it's a vintage instrument. >   that was my first call... but 'tis the season to be out tuning, I guess, as John Bishop appears to be out.   John V  
(back) Subject: RE: Blenheim Palace (Willis) From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 10:22:05 -0500   At 12:49 AM 2004-12-15 -0500, you wrote: >There is a 1930's smallish (but kick-ass) 3 manual Casavant near here. >See http://www.marykeanechapel.com:16080/organ/ >for the stoplist. > >It is interesting... every time a British organist comes to play it, they >fall in love with it. I wonder if it is because it is what a Willis = organ >should have been? On paper, it has many of the characteristics I'm = hearing >about Willis organs (the nomenclature is all French, but as we've = discussed >before this means little, and I do not really know what a Cavaille-Coll = is >supposed to sound like), yet it sounds just gorgeous, and is great for = all >sorts of things (Bach being its weak point, but I've heard clever >organists... Roger Sayer especially, one of the British organists who >couldn't get over the beauty of this organ, get around this nicely). = I've >never actually heard it used to accompany a choir, since it has been used >only for organ recitals since the church closed many years ago. (It is = now >owned by the nearby shaker museum, though the chapel clearly is = completely >unrelated to the shakers other than location), but it would be very good = at >it. It does accompany a congregation very well, but between the bottom- >heavy stoplist and the reverberant accoustics one has to be careful not = to >turn it into mud. It is quite possible without the reeds (as well as = with). > >The stoplist fails to mention that all the standard super- and sub- = couplers >are present, including to pedal from all 3 manual divisions. > >This organ, with Thomas Brown at the console, produced the best rendition = of >Vierne's "Carillon de Westminster" I've heard yet. Roger Sayer did it = too, >and it was just as awesome that time too. > >Andy   Andy,   I am living in Casavant country. Actually Toronto, Canada. Lots of Casavants around here.   The Casavants of that era were generally not the greatest, although some were a whole lot better than others, at least tonally. I suppose a lot = has to do with correct installation, voicing, and room acoustics.   It is great though if you have a great Casavant in your neighbourhood, where everything works together for a successful installation.   Another thing about Casavants, they were generally very well built. Some older Casavants around Toronto, are still original, and are now almost a century old.   Arie V.      
(back) Subject: Re: Jardine From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 10:15:17 -0800   >Just was offered to broker sale of a turn of the century Jardine >unit organ. Looks like 4 - 5 ranks, even an oboe! 2 manuals, pedal. >It's in maintained playing condition. Very sweet sound. Original >stencilled pipes .I have no idea of its market value. any thoughts >out there? Sebastian? Email me privately for pictures and other info. > >John V   I should add that I mean around Victorian times, of course. Still hunting for an Opus #. any one know where to look?   John V  
(back) Subject: Willis organs From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 07:33:36 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Ross is essentially right, but I suspect he is tarring all the Willis's with the same broad brush.   Fr.Willis produced fine organs which sounded impressive, had a fair amount of clarity and brilliance and an unbelievably magnificent Full Swell....far better than all the rest.   However, as accompaniment instruments, they are badly flawed and hard work. As Ross points out, the Choir organs were, I think, always unenclosed, with a strange collection of individual stops which really didn't amount to anything useful. The Pedal basses were far too loud, and with hard blown, rapidly diminishing pipe scales in the manual Diapason choruses, rather harsh in anything less than a very resonant building.   The Fr.Willis Mixtures, usually with 17.19.22. ranks, are entirely agreeable.   The Great Reeds at Kilburn are probably the best I have personally ever heard, but they do tend to gate crash the party!   I don't think I have a problem with ANY Fr.Willis organ, but I doubt that I would ever want anyone to copy the style.   With the later Willis organs, like those of Arthur Harrison, the tendency was towards orchestral tones and the almost total absence of anything bright. Like Harrison, Willis went the way of Harmonic Mixtures which included the b21st. The top end of the Mixtures were like high pitched flute choruses. With much closer reed tones on Great, Pedal and Solo, the effect was not good.....but they loved it at the time!   It's interesting, but I recall talking to quite elderly organists back in the 60's and 70's, who remembered the original organ at St.George's Hall, Liverpool, before it was enlarged by Willis 3. They didn't approve of the high pressure "Grand Choruses" and the closer toned party horn (Tuba) (30" wg) on the Solo.   They recalled, with almost misty-eyed affection, the blazing brilliance of the original Fr Willis Tuba, and regretted its' passing.   "Nothink like as gud as the furst one," (That's Liverpool speak....think "The Beatles")   However, I often smile when I think of the the young brothers sat on the steps outside St.George's Hall, Liverpool. I had just been making a terrible din with some toccata or other, and happy to have assaulted the ears of everyone within a mile radius, I left the building.   These two kids sat there, and one turned to me (the eldest one) and said, "Wes t'at u playin t'at organ in thur."   "Yes," replied.   "I tolled u it was 'im, did'n I, ower kid?" The eldest continued.   The litte one sucked an ice-cream and nodded.   The eldest turned to me again, "So 'ow meni puipes dus it 'av in it, whack?"   "I think about 8,000," I replied.   The eldest nudged his ice-cream sucking brother and replied, "Imagin' t'at ower kid....fillin' 8,000 puipes full wi' wacky-bacci."   Liverpool is such a delight, but bless them, they DID watch my alloy wheels for me when I went to the pub for a meal, and it only cost me =A31 each for their services!!!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       --- TheShieling <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> wrote:     > > Not being an Englishman, but living some 13000 miles > away, I'll still have > the courage to jump in from my (not extensive) > knowledge of Willis organs. > > One of the main problems is that they were not > really designed either for > accompanying singing or for playing the great > literature of the organ.     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - Find what you need with new enhanced search. http://info.mail.yahoo.com/mail_250  
(back) Subject: Westminster Cathedral From: "alantaylor1" <alantaylor1@members.v21.co.uk> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 15:33:56 -0000   I thought you would take the line that it really was a Lewis. (grin) = However much as I agree with you in general about organs, I cannot even come close to agreement on the Westminster Cathedral organ.   I suppose I am lucky enough to be able to hear it regularly for services = and recitals. Played by its own organists. Yes, it is powerful. But, there are also many beautiful and quite stops. Plus two clear and singing choruses = on the Great. The organ is now used more than at any time in it's past. Including for interludes between psalms at Vespers. There are now even = organ Masses. I think you do need to hear this organ, and how it is used during the liturgy, to really appreciate all it does.   The problem of only hearing it in recitals, to my mind, is that visiting recitalists often go for the loud and flashy. And therefore most of the organ isn't used or heard during these recitals.   I had better not put into print my views of the Willis firm and owners. I can say that this firm did wonderful work up to Willis 11.   Alan London   Hello,   Well, it started off as a Lewis did it not, under the auspices of John Courage, of the family that paid for the instrument, with Dupre acting as consultant?   Apparently, some of the earliest pipework is distinctly Lewis.   What is wonderful about that organ anyway?   It makes a lot of noise, but I find it awfully dull as compared to, for example, the reputed "Willis 3" at Liverpool. I would admit that is better than that awful instrument Willis installed at St.Giles' Cathedral, Edinburgh, and which has now been mercifully scrapped save for a few pedal pipes.   Sheffield City Hall......dull as ditch-water.   I recall talking to Ian Wells and Prof.Ian Tracey about the Liberpool instrument. Perhaps I can quote Ian Wells' words more or less exactly.   "Willis 3 was a terrible organ-builder. His organs are poor by any standard, and not very well made. For some reason, "he" got it all absolutely right at Liverpool.   Of course, "he" did nothing of the sort! It was left to others who knew better.   Perhaps one should also bear in mind that Willis 3 almost brought the company to bankruptcy, and frankly, much as I like the man, Willis IV didn't fare much better.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       --- alantaylor1 <alantaylor1@members.v21.co.uk> wrote:   > I suppose you count the wonderful Willis 111 organ > at Westminster Cathedral > as a Lewis Colin?       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - 250MB free storage. Do more. Manage less. http://info.mail.yahoo.com/mail_250   ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>     -- No virus found in this incoming message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.296 / Virus Database: 265.5.3 - Release Date: 14/12/2004   -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.296 / Virus Database: 265.5.3 - Release Date: 14/12/2004    
(back) Subject: RE: Blenheim Palace From: "Mr. R.E. Malone" <remalone@btinternet.com> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 15:47:41 -0000       -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Colin Mitchell Sent: 15 December 2004 14:30 To: PipeChat Subject: RE: Blenheim Palace   Hello all,   Whilst we are talking about organ builders, are there any books other than The one on Skinner, which would give us some insight into their interests.   Regards.   Richard.          
(back) Subject: RE: Blenheim Palace From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 10:00:26 -0600     >Hello all,   >Whilst we are talking about organ builders, are there any books other than >The one on Skinner, which would give us some insight into their interests.   >Regards.   >Richard.     I have a number of volumes that I have picked up second-hand...One that chronicles the life of Fr. Henry Willis, and tells about his organ building ideals, if I remember correctly. Another one, "The Modern British Organ," was written by Noel Bonavia-Hunt, who was considered at one point to be the premier Diapason-voicer in the world.   The Encylcopedia of Organ Stops Online cites Irwin regarding Hunt: "Noel A. Bonavia-Hunt of England has had extensive experience in building and voicing Diapasons of the Schulze design. He relates many interesting facts in the case in his unusually complete book on the organ, The Modern British Organ." (found under "Schultze Diapason" entry)   Best regards,   Daniel Hancock Springfield, Missouri