PipeChat Digest #5004 - Wednesday, December 15, 2004
 
RE: The Willis family values
  by "alantaylor1" <alantaylor1@members.v21.co.uk>
Addington Palace
  by "alantaylor1" <alantaylor1@members.v21.co.uk>
Willis and yet more Willis.Not to mention ther Coles
  by "alantaylor1" <alantaylor1@members.v21.co.uk>
St John's Anglican Church, Wainuiomata, New Zealand
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: St John's Anglican Church, Wainuiomata, New Zealand
  by "alantaylor1" <alantaylor1@members.v21.co.uk>
Re: Comparing great builders, NOT!
  by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Incompetency and Lack of Ethics
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: Cavaille-Coll(tangent from Willis thread)
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Ahrend & Brunzema
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com>
 

(back) Subject: RE: The Willis family values From: "alantaylor1" <alantaylor1@members.v21.co.uk> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 22:09:53 -0000   But Colin, how could Westminster Cathedral be a Lewis? Ross loves Lewis organs and dislikes Willis. And he certainly doesn't like Westminster Cathedral organ. (grin)   I can't see that it matters, in this context, which Willis built the Liverpool organ. The organ is a Willis.   Alan   !   Ross has hit it on the head unwittingly!   Hee Hee! He couldn't have picked a better list of Willis organs.   Farm Street......not much to do with Willis. Originally Anneesens.   Hereford...Fr Willis, and one of the best.   St Paul's ....a LOT of Fr Willis, including the 12 stop Swell, a fair bit of Mander new stuff and an itsy-bitsy bit of Wurlitzer. Ooops! Musn't forget the Fr Schmidt pipes from the old organ.   Liverpool Cathedral.....NOT the work of Willis 3 tonally.....try Willis 2! Willis 3 was an incompetent.   Westminster Cathedral....greatly influenced by Lewis and the staff of Lewis absorbed by the Willis dynasty.   The history of the Willis company would make a wonderful soap-opera containing powerful, self-assured men, criminal activity, bad family relations and marital scandal....I kid you not!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK               --- TheShieling <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> wrote:   There are > numerous recordings of Willis > organs. Including; Blenheim Palace, St Paul's > cathedral, Westminster > cathedral, Liverpool cathedral, Hereford cathedral, > Farm street Jesuit > church. And many, many more.       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Take Yahoo! Mail with you! Get it on your mobile phone. http://mobile.yahoo.com/maildemo   ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>     -- No virus found in this incoming message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.296 / Virus Database: 265.5.3 - Release Date: 14/12/2004   -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.296 / Virus Database: 265.5.3 - Release Date: 14/12/2004    
(back) Subject: Addington Palace From: "alantaylor1" <alantaylor1@members.v21.co.uk> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 22:15:04 -0000     Ross, we can agree at last. It was a boring organ.   Alan London   : I was always told, and always read, that the 2m H&H in the chapel at Addington Palace was wonderfully and refined, utterly superb. Well, I thought it was so effete and understated, lacking in character and volume, that it was plain boring and remote.   Others may slay me for saying that if they wish :-)   Ross     -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.296 / Virus Database: 265.5.3 - Release Date: 14/12/2004    
(back) Subject: Willis and yet more Willis.Not to mention ther Coles From: "alantaylor1" <alantaylor1@members.v21.co.uk> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 22:26:37 -0000   Well well, what a small world. I know Alasdair very well. And of coarse Harry. I tease Harry by saying that TC Lewis and Wurlitzer were the same company. And that Southwark was really a Wurlitzer without the tremulants.   No, I wouldn't rebuild the Kings College organ. I would replace what has been removed over the years. It does a fine job in the building it was designed and built for. We all agree that the best organ stop is the building itself.   Alan   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of TheShieling Sent: 15 December 2004 22:12 To: 'PipeChat' Subject: RE: Willis and yet more Willis   >Are!! Harry Coles's old church. You did say in the City of London, Ross. The City of London is just the square mile around St Paul's. Harry's church = was, he has now retired, at Shepherds Bush in West London. Harry loved that = organ and the sound it makes. But maybe you discount what he thinks Ross.   Yes, I should have said the "city" rather than the "City" and been more precise. Apologies.   Harry and I wrote reams to each other for many years and I stayed in his flat in Loughton for ten days in 1992. In my recent trip, I stayed win his son Alasdair, p-in-c of both St Mary's Bourne St and St Barnabas's = Pimlico, at the clergy house next to St Mary's. As you will know, Harry was a = fanatic for TCLewis sound, especially Southwark's 4m, but yes, he did love the 9 = (or 10?) stop wee Willis he played in latter years.   >I think to say that just about all of the recordings of UK cathedral = Willis organs are somehow the product of the recording engineers whim or fancy, = is gilding the lily a bit Ross. I have the recordings. I have heard just = about all of the organs live.   I don't think recording engineers can help it, to be fair. They must translated a live experience in (often) a fabulous building to something very 5th rate in comparison, i.e. a hi-fi set at home with a handful of speakers and nothing like the "ambience" (to sue that awful word which = means so much more than reverberation period).   >It seems to me a bad idea to measure one type or form of organ against another.   Yes, I really do agree, for a host of reasons. I think it is permissible, though, to say when we don't like a particular builder's work much, = speaking tonally.   >I would start again and build a brand new organ at the abbey.   Yes. Aye. Yea. Verily.   Would you also start again at King's Cambridge? Without the fabulous acoustics, the organ would be very average.   Ross     ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>     -- No virus found in this incoming message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.296 / Virus Database: 265.5.3 - Release Date: 14/12/2004   -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.296 / Virus Database: 265.5.3 - Release Date: 14/12/2004    
(back) Subject: St John's Anglican Church, Wainuiomata, New Zealand From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 16 Dec 2004 11:53:28 +1300   >Yes--!   Trying to be brief(ish) :-)   The church has a difficult steep site that had to have much bulldozing to get a flat level pad for the new church. The only possible orientation was north-south, with the altar at the south end (thus never getting the sun except in part of midsummer).   The church had only about 100 active parishioners (spread over 4 services = a week, some people coming twice or even 3 times) and was in a hard-up, working-class dormitory suburb. The parish was in debt and had only about $300 in the church fund.   The existing building, a wooden one from the 1950s, was used as both = church and hall, and was to be retained as the church hall.   Money was thus extremely limited, and the size had to be suitable as well = as the budget. So, I designed the church and we built it ourselves (apart = from the slab floor and the actual walls) and raised all the money by great fundraising and great giving. In 1981 we were told by a quantity surveyor that the cost would be $300,000 for just the church itself. We actually built it by 1983, and it cost $100,000, and that included stained-glass windows, pipe organ, furnishings, heaters, plumbing, concrete forecourt = etc.   Thinking of acoustics and lighting, and of the space we needed, the church had to be rectangular, and I decided on 34ft wide and 56ft long, actual proportions needing to be exactly right for the acoustics I wanted. The floor is a 6" thick concrete slab covered on top with quarry tiles (i.e. ceramic and exceptionally hard and reflective). There is no carpet at all. The walls are of hard concrete block and unpainted inside. The walls are 25ft high at the eaves of the church and the ceiling, with a central longitudinal hip, is of inch-thick oregon pine, with the central ridge = 31ft 6" up, i.e. a 15-degree slope. The roof is supported by wooden trusses = that don't interfere with the sound. The west end has a 30-seat steep gallery = and the organ is in that (the organ's another story, which I'll talk about below). The west wall has a central window roughly 9ft wide and 12ft tall, of coloured glass applique'd onto 6mm toughened glass. The north wall (physically facing east so getting the morning sun) is very plain, apart from six windows at the top, filled with gold glass, each window about 4ft long and 2ft high. These are openable from below, for ventilation. The = south wall (facing geographical west, so getting midday-till-dusk sun) has six lancets, each a foot wide and about 15ft high. These are filled with hand-made Mondrian-style glass we got 2nd-hand. They are double-glazed on the outside with heavy plate glass as protection. The east (altar) wall (facing geographical south) is completely plain apart from the central window, which is some 25ft high and 12ft 6 ins. wide, made up of 25 panels of the same kind of glass as at the west end (I made these windows, Ross said immodestly).   And that's it. With the huge east and west windows, there is no end-to-end slap echo, and excess low frequencies are lost through the glass while all the highs are reflected. So, as planned, there is a veritable liveness, = with mid-and-high-frequency bias in the building that makes speech crystal = clear, there being not the slightest need for speech amplification. Music is = alive, rich, warm, without bass heaviness. The choir sits in the west gallery.   The organ. Well. As we were finishing the church, and putting up with a diseased old Riha electroid we'd been given (which was actually a lot = better than the old suction reed organ), I happened by chance to overhear a conversation in a street miles away: two strangers saying the youngsters = in their (Baptist) church had voted for their pipe organ to be removed as "uncool". I interrupted the conversation of these two gents, as politely = as possible, and the upshot after delicate negotiations lasting six weeks, = was that we were given their 2rk Compton 2m&Ped organ. It was from the 1950s = and had been originally in a private home in Christchurch where I once played it. Just Open Diapason (8ft CC to 2ft, 8ft octave haskelled) and metal Bourdon from 16ft to 2ft, a dozen extension stops. With some help from an electrician in the parish we dismantled it, brought it home and = re-installed it above our west gallery, detaching the console, removing the swell box completely for a brighter and louder sound. At that time, too, I was given $2000 from the estate of a 105-yr-old parishioner who had died, to be = spent "at the Vicar's discretion on one item for the new church". The family = were delighted that I suggested spending this on the organ. So, I drove for 11 hours to a friendly organbuilder in Auckland with my (then, not now) large station wagon, for $2000 of 2nd-hand bits. I got a 2rk direct-electric = chest (25 years old) by Laukhuff, a TenC Dulciana (unknown make, but about 1871) of very gentle tone, and a gruff 1872 Oboe (actually by Schultze, but it's not a great rank, well, hardly even good) to 8ft CC. We wired in couplers = to Great and Pedal for these 2 additional ranks. The Dulciana is an enormous asset, enabling soft music and the 8ft metal stopped flute to be solo'd. = The Oboe is big, gruff, hearty, adding a rich clang to the Diapason unit at 8 = 4 and 2ft. Actually, we only needed $1978.54 so had $21.46 left over! Now, 20 years later, the organ is still playing and very easily supports a packed church of 120 people singing noisily.   There we have it. How did I, as Vicar, become such a dictator? Well, I produced some sketches and plans for a new church when I arrived as Vicar and the vestry liked them, so we took them to a special congregational meeting. That meeting voted exactly 100 votes for, to two against, to = "build according to the Vicar's plans and directions". Wow. What trust in a new Vicar! Incredibly long hours spent in the parish doing fundraising and in = a handful of us doing all the building and finishings and furnishings, but there is the church at a tiny fraction of the price it should have been.   Ross    
(back) Subject: RE: St John's Anglican Church, Wainuiomata, New Zealand From: "alantaylor1" <alantaylor1@members.v21.co.uk> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 23:01:42 -0000   You didn't mention the copy you had made, and installed, of the High Altar of St Mary's Bourne Street. I am sure it looks very good in your church.   Alan   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of TheShieling Sent: 15 December 2004 22:53 To: 'PipeChat' Subject: St John's Anglican Church, Wainuiomata, New Zealand   >Yes--!   Trying to be brief(ish) :-)   The church has a difficult steep site that had to have much bulldozing to get a flat level pad for the new church. The only possible orientation was north-south, with the altar at the south end (thus never getting the sun except in part of midsummer).   The church had only about 100 active parishioners (spread over 4 services = a week, some people coming twice or even 3 times) and was in a hard-up, working-class dormitory suburb. The parish was in debt and had only about $300 in the church fund.   The existing building, a wooden one from the 1950s, was used as both = church and hall, and was to be retained as the church hall.   Money was thus extremely limited, and the size had to be suitable as well = as the budget. So, I designed the church and we built it ourselves (apart = from the slab floor and the actual walls) and raised all the money by great fundraising and great giving. In 1981 we were told by a quantity surveyor that the cost would be $300,000 for just the church itself. We actually built it by 1983, and it cost $100,000, and that included stained-glass windows, pipe organ, furnishings, heaters, plumbing, concrete forecourt = etc.   Thinking of acoustics and lighting, and of the space we needed, the church had to be rectangular, and I decided on 34ft wide and 56ft long, actual proportions needing to be exactly right for the acoustics I wanted. The floor is a 6" thick concrete slab covered on top with quarry tiles (i.e. ceramic and exceptionally hard and reflective). There is no carpet at all. The walls are of hard concrete block and unpainted inside. The walls are 25ft high at the eaves of the church and the ceiling, with a central longitudinal hip, is of inch-thick oregon pine, with the central ridge = 31ft 6" up, i.e. a 15-degree slope. The roof is supported by wooden trusses = that don't interfere with the sound. The west end has a 30-seat steep gallery = and the organ is in that (the organ's another story, which I'll talk about below). The west wall has a central window roughly 9ft wide and 12ft tall, of coloured glass applique'd onto 6mm toughened glass. The north wall (physically facing east so getting the morning sun) is very plain, apart from six windows at the top, filled with gold glass, each window about 4ft long and 2ft high. These are openable from below, for ventilation. The = south wall (facing geographical west, so getting midday-till-dusk sun) has six lancets, each a foot wide and about 15ft high. These are filled with hand-made Mondrian-style glass we got 2nd-hand. They are double-glazed on the outside with heavy plate glass as protection. The east (altar) wall (facing geographical south) is completely plain apart from the central window, which is some 25ft high and 12ft 6 ins. wide, made up of 25 panels of the same kind of glass as at the west end (I made these windows, Ross said immodestly).   And that's it. With the huge east and west windows, there is no end-to-end slap echo, and excess low frequencies are lost through the glass while all the highs are reflected. So, as planned, there is a veritable liveness, = with mid-and-high-frequency bias in the building that makes speech crystal = clear, there being not the slightest need for speech amplification. Music is = alive, rich, warm, without bass heaviness. The choir sits in the west gallery.   The organ. Well. As we were finishing the church, and putting up with a diseased old Riha electroid we'd been given (which was actually a lot = better than the old suction reed organ), I happened by chance to overhear a conversation in a street miles away: two strangers saying the youngsters = in their (Baptist) church had voted for their pipe organ to be removed as "uncool". I interrupted the conversation of these two gents, as politely = as possible, and the upshot after delicate negotiations lasting six weeks, = was that we were given their 2rk Compton 2m&Ped organ. It was from the 1950s = and had been originally in a private home in Christchurch where I once played it. Just Open Diapason (8ft CC to 2ft, 8ft octave haskelled) and metal Bourdon from 16ft to 2ft, a dozen extension stops. With some help from an electrician in the parish we dismantled it, brought it home and = re-installed it above our west gallery, detaching the console, removing the swell box completely for a brighter and louder sound. At that time, too, I was given $2000 from the estate of a 105-yr-old parishioner who had died, to be = spent "at the Vicar's discretion on one item for the new church". The family = were delighted that I suggested spending this on the organ. So, I drove for 11 hours to a friendly organbuilder in Auckland with my (then, not now) large station wagon, for $2000 of 2nd-hand bits. I got a 2rk direct-electric = chest (25 years old) by Laukhuff, a TenC Dulciana (unknown make, but about 1871) of very gentle tone, and a gruff 1872 Oboe (actually by Schultze, but it's not a great rank, well, hardly even good) to 8ft CC. We wired in couplers = to Great and Pedal for these 2 additional ranks. The Dulciana is an enormous asset, enabling soft music and the 8ft metal stopped flute to be solo'd. = The Oboe is big, gruff, hearty, adding a rich clang to the Diapason unit at 8 = 4 and 2ft. Actually, we only needed $1978.54 so had $21.46 left over! Now, 20 years later, the organ is still playing and very easily supports a packed church of 120 people singing noisily.   There we have it. How did I, as Vicar, become such a dictator? Well, I produced some sketches and plans for a new church when I arrived as Vicar and the vestry liked them, so we took them to a special congregational meeting. That meeting voted exactly 100 votes for, to two against, to = "build according to the Vicar's plans and directions". Wow. What trust in a new Vicar! Incredibly long hours spent in the parish doing fundraising and in = a handful of us doing all the building and finishings and furnishings, but there is the church at a tiny fraction of the price it should have been.   Ross     ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>     -- No virus found in this incoming message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.296 / Virus Database: 265.5.3 - Release Date: 14/12/2004   -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.296 / Virus Database: 265.5.3 - Release Date: 14/12/2004    
(back) Subject: Re: Comparing great builders, NOT! From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 17:20:24 -0600   Come along, Ross: We are waiting with eagerness, galore. F. Richard Burt ..    
(back) Subject: Incompetency and Lack of Ethics From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 18:27:12 EST   One of my friends is the Interim Music Director at a church in Charlotte, = NC that is having problems with their old Baldwin organ. He is just the director, and they are looking to hire an organist. The church was going = to have the organ technician come to service the organ, and he wanted me to come play = the organ and look it over to make a list of the problems so the tech (who = sold them the organ) could fix it. This man sold the church this organ to = replace an old Allen 201 about a year and a half ago, when the local Allen and the = local Rodgers dealers wouldn't return the church's phone calls. They looked for =   other alternatives, and they heard about this guy from the large music = company here in town.   This organ technician, who normally services Hammonds (he used to service = our former Hammond organ at my church, until we cut him loose because he = couldn't ever fix the organ and we ended up having more problems with it and just decided to get another one) sold these people a pile of junk and charged = them almost $11,000.   So, after making the looooooong list of what needed to be fixed, he came = to this church yesterday--and copped a major attitude with the music = director, the pastor and myself. He told the pastor that the music director was "high falutin' " and that he just couldn't be pleased. While the organ was = being fixed, the tech blew up the whole thing, and now the organ is unplayable. He got =   mad, told the pastor there was nothing more he could do, and just left. = Right before he left, he told me and the music director that the church bought a =   "used car" and they were stuck with it.   The problem is that this church went through a major split a few years = back, and the previous organist, who picked out the organ wasn't really an = organist, and didn't know what he was getting. He was wowed by a large number of drawknobs, he didn't know that the organ was over 20 years old, and the = Pastor just knew that it sounded better than the early digital Allen. Money was = tight, with the church going from over 500 members to 200 and a family in the = church donated the $11,000 so no one quibbled.   Then today, another one of my Choir Director friends called me to tell me that their Rodgers pipe combo organ was just tuned earlier this week by = another local electronic technician--yes, that's right, this guy also tuned the pipes!!! It took the guy 4 hours to tune 4 ranks of flue = pipes--Principal, Gemshorn, Gedeckt, Rohr Flute. Then he went in the back of the console and "tuned" = the electronics and "reset" the voices. While this was going on, my friend = told me, something happened, and every electronic stop ciphered, and the = technician couldn't get it to stop, so he had to come back the next day to figure out =   what was wrong.   Two churches in one week have been jacked around by two incompetent organ technicians in the same town. Yet these people are out servicing organs = and have no qualms about how they treat their customers or what they charge. The first church showed me the bills for what the guy had done to get the = Baldwin organ fixed on previous visits, and the service calls amount to well over = $1,000. The guy who worked on the Rodgers charged the church for his time = diagnosing the problem that he caused by fiddling around "tuning" the electronics. I = am sure that this problem is not only in the electronic organ arena, but I = have been lucky that I have worked with knowledgeable pipe organ service = people.   The lack of ethics that a company can sell a church an organ that is worth =   less than $200 and charge $11,000 blows my mind. Then to break it on a = service call and just walk out and leave it, after insulting the Music Director is =   just reprehensible. I wouldn't be able to sleep at night knowing I was = screwing customers over like that, but I guess he sleeps quite well, and probably = in a rather nice bed with profits like that!   The church is going to file a complaint with the Better Business Bureau, = but they have already put word out with the music store that gave the recommendation, as well as with other churches in the area who might use = his services. I am helping them find alternatives right now, putting them in touch with a local pipe organ company as well as some electronic organ companies. = Right now $$$ is tight for the church, but a pipe organ is what the Pastor and Music =   Director want.   Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Re: Cavaille-Coll(tangent from Willis thread) From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 18:40:14 -0500   On 12/15/04 2:23 PM, "RonSeverin@aol.com" <RonSeverin@aol.com> wrote:   > In A Humorous giddy mood today, and it's a good thing!   Agreed. I'm glad to catch you at his point. You DESERVE the good side = of all that.   Alsn      
(back) Subject: Re: Ahrend & Brunzema From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 18:52:01 -0500   Colin,   Jurgen Ahrend and Gerhard Brunzema were in business together for maybe 15 to 20 years. They may have been among the first to go into sympathetic organ restoration of old baroque organs, and together did some new organs in typical German baroque style.   Around 1970 Mr. Ahrend decided to leave his wife and shack up with some other women, and Mr. Brunzema, good Christian man that he was, took = offence at that, and flew the coop. He emigrated to Canada and became tonal director at Casavant.   About 1980 he left Casavant and started his own company in Fergus, = Ontario, about a 50 mile drive from Toronto. There he built organs under his own name, according to his thinking on organ building. I remember playing = one, thinking it was one of the most beautiful organs I had ever played or heard. Only negatives were, a very weak 16' Subbass, and an eighth lengh Regal in the Brustwerk ( kind of useless reed on a small organ). This organ later was destroyed in a fire that burned down the church it was in.   I suppose guys like Martin Pasi, Richards & Fowkes build organs in his = style.   By the way, Canada is supposed to get a Bach style organ by Jurgen Ahrend soon. To go to cowboy town, Calgary.   Arie V.         At 01:19 PM 2004-12-15 -0800, you wrote: >Hello, > >Ari has mentioned something which has bugged me for >some time........I should have asked pipechat, >shouldn't I? > >I've never been able to quite understand who Ahrend & >Brunzema were, where they were from and whether these >is a connection between Jurgen Ahrend and the console >name of Ahrend & Brunzema. > >Now, at least, I have learned something about Brunzema >and the Casavant connection. Of course, that doesn't >mean a thing in the UK, for we don't have a single >Casavant organ so far as I am aware. > >Larry Phelps, of course, built the new organ for >Hexham Abbey here in the UK.....so far as I know, the >only one. > >I've made all sorts of searched concerning Ahrend & >Brunzema, but to no avail. > >What I do know, is that there is a connection with the >Sweelinck organ in Amsterdam, and I once played a >really good neo-baroque organ in an RC church in >Amsterdam.....the name of St.Thomas springs to mind, >but I could be wrong since it was 25 years ago. > >That new organ was by Ahrend & Brunzema, and in the >spacious acoustic, I liked it very much indeed. > >Details anyone? > >Regards, > >Colin Mitchell UK