PipeChat Digest #5005 - Thursday, December 16, 2004
 
RE: St John's Anglican Church, Wainuiomata, New Zealand
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: St. Matthew Lutheran, Hanover, Pennsylvania
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
Bourne Street.
  by "alantaylor1" <alantaylor1@members.v21.co.uk>
Willis incompetent? USA organs?
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
CD of huge Austin, Hanover PA
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <wvanpelt@erols.com>
Re: St. Matthew Lutheran, Hanover, Pennsylvania
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
RE: Bourne Street.
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: MP3 Files
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Aggie War Hymn
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
The softer side of organ music ... [Was: Willis ...]
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com>
Re: The softer side of organ music ... [Was: Willis ...]
  by "Brent Johnson" <brentmj@charter.net>
Re: Organ Shoes
  by <SWF12262@aol.com>
Conditor vs. Creator
  by <SWF12262@aol.com>
RE: The softer side of organ music ... [Was: Willis ...]
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: Bourne Street.
  by "alantaylor1" <alantaylor1@members.v21.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: RE: St John's Anglican Church, Wainuiomata, New Zealand From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 16 Dec 2004 12:59:35 +1300   >You didn't mention the copy you had made, and installed, of the High = Altar of St Mary's Bourne Street. I am sure it looks very good in your church.   Grand Baroque, indeed. We are so short of history and fine churches in New Zealand that St Mary's Bourne Street would be regarded as a national treasure and given an A+ Historic Places Trust classification. Some bits aren't quite to my liking, but I do think it's a fine place and "feels" right, too.   The altar in "my" wee church at Wainuiomata is 8ft long, traditional, of dark-stained slightly-carved oak, with magnificent frontals (got 2nd-hand, made in 1898), and it's brought forward about 3ft from the east wall. The wood of the altar is seen only during Holy Week.   Trying to be on-topic: the organ in Bourne Street is great in the building = - a 3m Walker for about 75 people (numbers have gone up since Alasdair took over). I met Alasdair first 12 years ago: he's a wonderful fellow, and my wife and I very much enjoyed staying with the family for a few days.   I'd love to go on another trip to the UK, but costs from NZ are = horrendous. I s'pose I played 40 organs in the five weeks I was there, all the way = from Canterbury Cathedral to Kirkwall Cathedral, both with 3m organs. One of happiest periods was a few days with organbuilder friend David Miller in Orwell, nr Cambridge. We rushed frantically all over Cambridgeshire and round about, playing heaps of small organs in wonderful old churches in picturesque villages - Whittlestone, Orwell, Papworth Everard, Great and Little Abington, etc.etc.   Reminiscing.....   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: St. Matthew Lutheran, Hanover, Pennsylvania From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 19:03:17 EST   In a message dated 12/15/04 3:31:50 PM Eastern Standard Time, shawn.gingrich@firstumchershey.org writes:   << I do recall a cd recording but can't recall the gentleman who did it = ca. early 1990s. >>   Wasn't there one by James (Jim) Dale, former organist of the naval = academy?  
(back) Subject: Bourne Street. From: "alantaylor1" <alantaylor1@members.v21.co.uk> Date: Thu, 16 Dec 2004 00:07:13 -0000   Ross, oh Ross!!! You liked the organ at St Mary's. Ross it is a WILLIS. = Not a Walker.   Alan   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of TheShieling Sent: 16 December 2004 00:00 To: 'PipeChat' Subject: RE: St John's Anglican Church, Wainuiomata, New Zealand   >You didn't mention the copy you had made, and installed, of the High = Altar of St Mary's Bourne Street. I am sure it looks very good in your church.   Grand Baroque, indeed. We are so short of history and fine churches in New Zealand that St Mary's Bourne Street would be regarded as a national treasure and given an A+ Historic Places Trust classification. Some bits aren't quite to my liking, but I do think it's a fine place and "feels" right, too.   The altar in "my" wee church at Wainuiomata is 8ft long, traditional, of dark-stained slightly-carved oak, with magnificent frontals (got 2nd-hand, made in 1898), and it's brought forward about 3ft from the east wall. The wood of the altar is seen only during Holy Week.   Trying to be on-topic: the organ in Bourne Street is great in the building = - a 3m Walker for about 75 people (numbers have gone up since Alasdair took over). I met Alasdair first 12 years ago: he's a wonderful fellow, and my wife and I very much enjoyed staying with the family for a few days.   I'd love to go on another trip to the UK, but costs from NZ are = horrendous. I s'pose I played 40 organs in the five weeks I was there, all the way = from Canterbury Cathedral to Kirkwall Cathedral, both with 3m organs. One of happiest periods was a few days with organbuilder friend David Miller in Orwell, nr Cambridge. We rushed frantically all over Cambridgeshire and round about, playing heaps of small organs in wonderful old churches in picturesque villages - Whittlestone, Orwell, Papworth Everard, Great and Little Abington, etc.etc.   Reminiscing.....   Ross     ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>     -- No virus found in this incoming message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.296 / Virus Database: 265.5.3 - Release Date: 14/12/2004   -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.296 / Virus Database: 265.5.3 - Release Date: 14/12/2004    
(back) Subject: Willis incompetent? USA organs? From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 16 Dec 2004 13:44:21 +1300   Hugh MCrum here in NZ is a very close friend of mine and lives just an = hour away. In his late 60s now, he's been in NZ for about 40 years and worked = for a time with Ceo.Croft & Son before setting up as an organbuilder on his = own. He still maintains and tunes many organs and is an excellent and helpful = man in all respects. Hugh was born, bred and trained in Edinburgh, so I once asked him why he came to NZ from the employ of the Willis firm. His answer was brief, and not enlarged upon, "I couldn't stand the shoddy workmanship any longer."   I've only heard one organ in the USA that is "old", the one in San Anselmo RC Church, about 100 years old. Judging from recordings though, a lot of = the old USA organs are very fine tonally, from the 1850s onwards. I treasure tapes I've been sent (of Pipedreams programmes) and also recordings like E.Power Biggs' one. It's probably just the recording techniques, or something like that, but the smallish organs, say up to 20 stops, often impress me more than the behemoths of 70 stops upwards. When I make = positive noises about a heap of English organbuilders from the 1850s on, I never intend criticism of American instruments but would note that not having heard them in the flesh, any comment good or bad would be wrong. So, I = hope no one here on Pipechat thinks I'm being politically-correctly "anti-American." It would fulfill a great dream if I were able to hear the instruments the OHS visits every year, but that'll never be financially possible, sadly.   Rambling a bit more: I wonder why recording companies and organists don't = do more with smaller organs? I'd love to hear more of the Biggs-type rambles round different organs, along with unusual or rare music. Too often in record shops here, I see the same old dozen big pieces, almost always full blast on very large organs.   Maybe there are such records and CDs and it's just that I don't know of = them and can't afford them anyway......   End of mouthing on, Ross    
(back) Subject: CD of huge Austin, Hanover PA From: "William T. Van Pelt" <wvanpelt@erols.com> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 19:42:32 -0500   In response to Charlie Lester's inquiry: "Does anyone know if any recent = recordings have been made on the gigantic (about 250 ranks) early-1920s = Austin at St. Matthew Lutheran, Hanover, Pennsylvania?"   Lorenz Maycher plays it on OHS-91 "Historic Organs of Baltimore" (yes, = Hanover is a bit far, but it is included nonetheless) in a fabulous = concert given during the OHS National Convention in Baltimore(including a = hymn accompanied magnificently and sung stupedously). Check it out at = http://www.ohscatalog.org   Bill    
(back) Subject: Re: St. Matthew Lutheran, Hanover, Pennsylvania From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 18:56:06 -0600   >In a message dated 12/15/04 3:31:50 PM Eastern Standard Time, >shawn.gingrich@firstumchershey.org writes: > ><< I do recall a cd recording but can't recall the gentleman who did it = ca. > early 1990s. >> > >Wasn't there one by James (Jim) Dale, former organist of the naval = academy?   There is one by Jim Dale and it is available at the following URL http://www.secondfret.com/dale.htm   David  
(back) Subject: RE: Bourne Street. From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 16 Dec 2004 14:36:59 +1300   >Ross, oh Ross!!! You liked the organ at St Mary's. Ross it is a WILLIS. = Not a Walker.   No, it isn't. You are wrong. The organ is a Walker, built in 1874. Many prepared-for stops were added before 1900. It was rebuilt by Willis into = the Gambier- Parry west gallery in 1913. Gambier-Parry designed the case, too, not Willis. The organ was further rebuilt by Willis in 1928, and then = again by Mander in 1982, though not much was changed on the tonal side beyond regulation and a bit of rev-voicing. My fellow-Kiwi, Gillian Weir, played the re-opening recital on 11 July 1982.   So, to sum up, the Walker organ was in the church for some 39 years before Willis got into it and altered it.   Oh boy, don't I sound pompous in stating all of this! Sorry, folks, but = one must needs be accurate, mustn't one? ;-)   Ross    
(back) Subject: RE: MP3 Files From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 20:22:04 -0600   Cool, Scot. Who are your teachers?     Glenda Sutton   gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Scott Montgomery Sent: Wednesday, December 15, 2004 7:38 AM To: PipeChat Subject: MP3 Files     For those of you that are interested, I have put last Thursday's recital up on my web page. Some files are large, and may take a few minutes to load up.     Thanks, let me know if there are any problems.     To see them, go to www.scottmontgomerymusic.net/listeningpage.htm        
(back) Subject: Re: Aggie War Hymn From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2004 23:52:00 EST   It's also the fight song for my high school, Christian Brothers High = School, Memphis, home of THE first high school marching band in the US. (And they = are excellent, always have been!) I played trumpet in that band from 1980-84.   Scott F. Foppiano Memphis, TN (scottfop@aol.com) Cantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat.  
(back) Subject: The softer side of organ music ... [Was: Willis ...] From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> Date: Thu, 16 Dec 2004 13:29:06 +0800   Ross,   Two of my favorite Organ CDs are "Organ Meditation (J=E1nos Sebesty=E9n) on= the Naxos label, and Todd Wilson's "In a Quiet Cathedral" on the Delos Int= ernational label.   Anyone else have favorites for us pragmatic purchasers of melodious polypho= ny rendered through pressurised pipes?   ----- Original Message ----- From: TheShieling <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>   > Maybe there are such records and CDs and it's just that I don't know of t= hem > and can't afford them anyway...... >=20 > End of mouthing on, > Ross   -- Jan Nijhuis nijhuis@email.com   --=20 ___________________________________________________________ Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm    
(back) Subject: Re: The softer side of organ music ... [Was: Willis ...] From: "Brent Johnson" <brentmj@charter.net> Date: Thu, 16 Dec 2004 00:01:59 -0600   Jan Nijhuis wrote:   >Ross, > >Two of my favorite Organ CDs are "Organ Meditation (J=E1nos Sebesty=E9n) = on the Naxos label, and Todd Wilson's "In a Quiet Cathedral" on the Delos = International label. > > >   For what it's worth, both of those albums are online at ORGANLive.com, and can be requested (even though Christmas mode is in full swing.) Brent Johnson ORGANLive - Music of the organ on demand http://www.organlive.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Shoes From: <SWF12262@aol.com> Date: Thu, 16 Dec 2004 02:40:40 EST   Dear Pipechatters, At the risk of being ostracized by the serious organ community, I'll pose =   the question -- am I the only organist who plays in "street" shoes? The = only time I wear my venerable organ shoes is when I play someone else's = instrument, and that as a courtesy. There are two reasons for this. #1. I am up = and down, around and about so much on a Sunday morning that my thin-soled = organ shoes would be worn out in a month! Typical weekend -- up to the balcony = on Saturday, brief rehearsal with the cantor, then down to the sacristy to = meet with the priest, back to the balcony -- prelude, processional, kyrie, = gloria, psalm, alleluia; do head count of the nave, then off to the rectory for a =   quick coffee (so nice of them to provide a speaker there so I know when I = need to be back!) -- up the stairs again; offertory, sanctus and remainder of the =   Mass. Sunday is worse -- like Saturday for the 8 a.m. then off to the = choir room; lead choir into church, etc. Lots of on and off bench, up and = down stairs, plenty of backing and forthing! Then like Saturday again for the = Noon. #2. I'm afflicted with flat feet, and have to wear rather substantial leather orthotics in my shoes. There's no way I can fit these and my = feet into the organ shoes, and the thick leather of the corrective adaptive devices = would render the thin soles of the organ shoes useless. Standing or walking in =   organ shoes sans orthotics is more or less painful, depending on how = recently the calluses have been removed. This being said, I am quite capable of = playing intricate pedal passages with great sensitivity in my Allen Edmond = oxfords! I regularly practice in Rockports with rubber soles (only difference is = they don't slide as well as leather soles). I've even practiced in hiking = boots [many years ago] which actually made my pedaling much more precise and responsive! [hmmmm....maybe I should try mittens on the manuals!] I = like my organ shoes, but having to change every time I walk the stairs from the balcony =   [lots of ouches otherwise] would have me changing shoes at least ten = times on a Sunday morning! Am I unique, or are there others who pedal with whatever = is on their feet? Pedal solos anyone? Steve  
(back) Subject: Conditor vs. Creator From: <SWF12262@aol.com> Date: Thu, 16 Dec 2004 03:00:52 EST   Anyone up for a really obscure trivia question? Many Protestant churches =   sing an Advent hymn to the tune Conditor Alme Siderum, while most Roman Catholic sources use the tune Creator Alme Siderum. The tunes are = identical, save for one note. Creator: mi do mi sol SOL la fa sol. Conditor: mi do mi = sol LA la fa sol. I have not had the opportunity to compare the texts and = sources, but suspect that the "conditor variant" in the chant might be Sarum = usage, an English variant in the heritage or interpretation of the chant. After = all these years working RC, that one note throws me now every time I sing it = in the Protestant form! Whatever the historical reason might be, isn't it interesting that this chant has survived from the seventh century with = only one variant note! Steve Folkers (Presbypiscometholic) Steven Weyand Folkers Director of Music St. Lambert Church Skokie, IL USA  
(back) Subject: RE: The softer side of organ music ... [Was: Willis ...] From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 16 Dec 2004 22:05:37 +1300   >Two of my favorite Organ CDs are "Organ Meditation (J=E1nos = Sebesty=E9n) on the Naxos label, and Todd Wilson's "In a Quiet Cathedral" on the Delos International label.   Yes, I have that first also, and do enjoy it very much. Don't know the second. Where is the Organ Meditation one played? Naxos are a good = label, in my experience.=20   Ross    
(back) Subject: RE: Bourne Street. From: "alantaylor1" <alantaylor1@members.v21.co.uk> Date: Thu, 16 Dec 2004 09:19:32 -0000   Ross, you really can't have it all ways. On another posting you said that = we shouldn't count the UK cathedral organs as Willis, because they had been rebuilt by others. Now you are saying quite the reverse about the St = Mary's organ.   Also, the stated aim of the Mander work in 1982 was to put the organ back into its 1928 Willis state. It even has a Willis 111 console.   Plus, and I am very surprised that you got this wrong, the organ wasn't moved and rebuilt by Willis in 1913, but by your favourite builder, Lewis. Lewis added the third manual and its stops. And radically altered the = tonal balance of the organ.   Then, only a few years later in 1928, the radical Willis rebuild then came about.   No I don't think you sounded pompous. Just a little desperate in having publicly praised an organ from a builder you don't like.   IF you ever come back to London, I will take you in hand and re-educate = your ears and ideas. (grin)   Alan London     >Ross, oh Ross!!! You liked the organ at St Mary's. Ross it is a WILLIS. = Not a Walker.   No, it isn't. You are wrong. The organ is a Walker, built in 1874. Many prepared-for stops were added before 1900. It was rebuilt by Willis into = the Gambier- Parry west gallery in 1913. Gambier-Parry designed the case, too, not Willis. The organ was further rebuilt by Willis in 1928, and then = again by Mander in 1982, though not much was changed on the tonal side beyond regulation and a bit of rev-voicing. My fellow-Kiwi, Gillian Weir, played the re-opening recital on 11 July 1982.   So, to sum up, the Walker organ was in the church for some 39 years before Willis got into it and altered it.   Oh boy, don't I sound pompous in stating all of this! Sorry, folks, but = one must needs be accurate, mustn't one? ;-)   Ross     ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>     -- No virus found in this incoming message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.296 / Virus Database: 265.5.3 - Release Date: 14/12/2004   -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.296 / Virus Database: 265.5.3 - Release Date: 14/12/2004