PipeChat Digest #5012 - Saturday, December 18, 2004
 
Re: G D & B
  by "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr>
Re: Greeks bearing Christmas trees, etc.
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
RE: St John's Anglican Church, Wainuiomata, New Zealand
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
RE: G D & B
  by "alantaylor1" <alantaylor1@members.v21.co.uk>
Re: Toronto Music Hall
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
RE: Console Accessories
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
RE: St John's Anglican Church, Wainuiomata, New Zealand
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: G D & B
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re:Christmas tree el Greco?
  by "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr>
Re: Greeks bearing Christmas trees, etc.
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
128' stops
  by "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk>
Breaking news - accompanied by a roll on the drums
  by "Harry Grove" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk>
RE: 128' stops
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: Breaking news - accompanied by a roll on the drums
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: 128' stops
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: G D & B From: "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr> Date: Sat, 18 Dec 2004 00:27:54 +0200   Ross wrote:   Could you tell me more about Maurice F-G as a person?   Yes - he was a very nice person. Quiet, shrewd and amusing. He served in = the RAF with my father during WW2 and I met him as a schoolboy through family connections and my interest in the organ. He founded an electronics company - a field in which he was an expert - and turned =A325,000 into =A31,000,000,000 in 30 years. Not many people do that. If you had known Maurice you would not have necessarily known it either, such was his modesty. He had a large 3 manual in his house which I played regularly. It is now = in Aldenham school, and I went on holiday with him on a trip round France, though I have told this story on the list already. We had a great time eating good food and drinking wine, quite apart from playing some outstanding organs. To get a really good picture of him I strongly recommend "Twenty One Years =   in Organ Building", which is a sort of autobiography combined with a = history and details of all the organs the firm built. You can get it on the net - look it up on Google, though I did post a British site address a few weeks =   back - country bookshop I think it's called.   Alan Taylor wrote   I think it could have been Farnham. My friend, now dead, Garrett gave the opening and only recital?   If it was St Martin's I have to plead guilty to giving the opening = recital. Having designed the organ I felt I should take responsibility for it! I = hate to admit it, but it is probably the firm's worst installation. 3 rank extension organ - by way of being an experiment. The Church didn't have = much money - I think it cost about =A3600, not much even in those days for an entirely new organ. However, Peter Hurford's three rank extension house organ worked very well - it was voiced for a room, and is much gentler in tone.   Garrett O'Brien would that be? I succeeded him as organist at St Thomas on =   The Bourne in Farnham - he was a good choir trainer. And yes, I suppose I must have produced Colin Mawby's record if it has my name on the cover! Apparently records made by Gaudeamus are collector's items these days. I think a friend of mine, Simon Andrewes, who is a director of BBC TV News = and one time pupil of mine has got quite a lot of them - he and Michael = Emanuel, who were still at school in those days, were the recording engineers - = quite outstanding! The one I would really like to get hold of is "A Concert from =   Altenberg Abbey" with the boy singers of Our Lady of Grace - it was = recorded in St John's Holland Road, a wonderful acoustic and a very fine 4 manual Willis organ - I can't remember which member of the family it was - not Father I don't think.   John Speller wrote: I could not believe how effective a little twelve-stop organ could be, and =   the organ seemed to have a "virile," exciting sound that was quite new to = me at that time. (In retrospect some of its inpact was due to having a Swell =   to Great Sub Octave coupler, not really a neo-baroque concept!)   Tooting has this feature (Swell to Great Sub Octave coupler) - it does add = a richness to the full organ if you haven't got a 16 manual reed. St Mary = of Eton is an interesting organ - it is a mixture of the old and the new. I mentioned coming across a recording made there by Simon Preston a few = weeks back. I still haven't had a chance to listen to it, but I will during the Christmas break. I haven't got an old fashioned turntable, but some = friends have.   John Foss http://www.organsandorganistsonline.com/                  
(back) Subject: Re: Greeks bearing Christmas trees, etc. From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 17 Dec 2004 17:29:12 +0000   On 12/17/04 9:51 PM, "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> wrote:   > There IS a custom among the Russians of bringing in boughs of WILLOWS on > Trinity Sunday. > Serbian Orth. Cathedral of St. Sava, Milwaukee: They carry pussy-willow branches as they process around the outside of the cathedral three times = on the day before Palm Sunday.   Alan    
(back) Subject: RE: St John's Anglican Church, Wainuiomata, New Zealand From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Fri, 17 Dec 2004 16:57:16 -0600   I'd love to see some pictures. Any chances?   Daniel Hancock Springfield, Missouri=09     >There we have it. How did I, as Vicar, become such a dictator? Well, I produced some sketches and plans for a new church when I arrived as Vicar and the vestry liked them, so we took them to a special congregational meeting. That meeting voted exactly 100 votes for, to two against, to "build according to the Vicar's plans and directions". Wow. What trust in a new Vicar! Incredibly long hours spent in the parish doing fundraising and in a handful of us doing all the building and finishings and furnishings, but there is the church at a tiny fraction of the price it should have been.   >Ross  
(back) Subject: RE: G D & B From: "alantaylor1" <alantaylor1@members.v21.co.uk> Date: Fri, 17 Dec 2004 23:58:50 -0000   Are John, if you gave the first recital, and it was a brand new organ, = it isn't the organ and church I mentioned. The organ I mentioned was a = small hymn machine that GD & B had rebuilt into a neo Baroque squealer. Yes, Garrett O'Brien was the organist I referred to. I think he was still = playing at St Thomas's at this time. Or maybe he had moved on to St Mary = Magdalene, Munster Square by this time.   The organ at Holland Road, any maybe I should drop my voice and whisper, = or Ross will stir and bight, is a Willis 111. Originally built by Gern. A = very fine organ. (sorry Ross)   Alan London         Alan Taylor wrote   I think it could have been Farnham. My friend, now dead, Garrett gave = the=20 opening and only recital?   If it was St Martin's I have to plead guilty to giving the opening = recital.=20 Having designed the organ I felt I should take responsibility for it! I = hate   to admit it, but it is probably the firm's worst installation. 3 rank=20 extension organ - by way of being an experiment. The Church didn't have = much   money - I think it cost about =A3600, not much even in those days for an =   entirely new organ. However, Peter Hurford's three rank extension house=20 organ worked very well - it was voiced for a room, and is much gentler = in=20 tone.   Garrett O'Brien would that be? I succeeded him as organist at St Thomas = on=20 The Bourne in Farnham - he was a good choir trainer. And yes, I suppose = I=20 must have produced Colin Mawby's record if it has my name on the cover!=20 Apparently records made by Gaudeamus are collector's items these days. I =   think a friend of mine, Simon Andrewes, who is a director of BBC TV News = and   one time pupil of mine has got quite a lot of them - he and Michael = Emanuel,   who were still at school in those days, were the recording engineers - = quite   outstanding! The one I would really like to get hold of is "A Concert = from=20 Altenberg Abbey" with the boy singers of Our Lady of Grace - it was = recorded   in St John's Holland Road, a wonderful acoustic and a very fine 4 manual =   Willis organ - I can't remember which member of the family it was - not=20 Father I don't think.     --=20 No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.296 / Virus Database: 265.6.0 - Release Date: 17/12/2004 =20    
(back) Subject: Re: Toronto Music Hall From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Fri, 17 Dec 2004 19:47:16 EST   Hi Arie:   I guess the answer to this story is, if you want a concert hall organ, call a builder who doesn't build neo baroque organs. I'm not against baroque organs, they have their place, but a concert hall organ needs to be heroic, and baroque doesn't come close to cutting it. Find a builder who builds those big so called tubby Diapasons they carry in a large room. I like red blooded big sounds for concert halls, not those whimpy, snarly, shrill, hicuppy, fart machines. They don't work in big buildings, and most of the time in small ones. <Grin>   I don't even think I will need my fire retardant suit for this call.   Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: RE: Console Accessories From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Fri, 17 Dec 2004 19:16:31 -0600   The good Reverend and the recital committee asked me to come back and do a recital in February. Even after I left they presented me with keys to the church and the invitation to practice there as much as I want, in the hopes that I might come back. But as Thomas Wolfe entitled a novel .. . . .   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Daniel Hancock Forgive me for asking if you've already explained this, but if she's your "successor," then why does the good Reverend want you to do her job?          
(back) Subject: RE: St John's Anglican Church, Wainuiomata, New Zealand From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Sat, 18 Dec 2004 18:47:19 +1300     >Subject: RE: St John's Anglican Church, Wainuiomata, New Zealand   >I'd love to see some pictures. Any chances?   I'll see what I can do, but I'll have to learn how to do this - and that means after Christmas now..   Ross      
(back) Subject: RE: G D & B From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Sat, 18 Dec 2004 18:51:32 +1300     >The organ at Holland Road, any maybe I should drop my voice and whisper, = or Ross will stir and bight, is a Willis 111. Originally built by Gern. A = very fine organ. (sorry Ross)   Is this the Holland Park Road Anglo-Catholic haven? Said to be the last church in London to have been built with a stone vault? That the one? If = it is, then Harry Coles took me there to a lengthy special evening service on my 1992 Trip. I didn't go to the console at all, so have no idea how big = the organ is or who built, but it was excessively loud and I felt that only = part of that could be blamed on the organist.   There, was that enough "bite" (or "bight" as you wrote, which my OED says, inter alia, means "curve of a rope") :-) :-)   Ross      
(back) Subject: Re:Christmas tree el Greco? From: "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr> Date: Sat, 18 Dec 2004 08:33:32 +0200   Steve wrote : "I was tuning the organ in the Greek Cathedral, Baltimore,"   If they have organs they will have Christmas Trees! Greek Orthodox Disneyland style is unique to the US, I think!   John Foss      
(back) Subject: Re: Greeks bearing Christmas trees, etc. From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Sat, 18 Dec 2004 01:04:17 -0600 (Central Standard Time)   Alan Freed wrote:   -------Original Message------- > They carry pussy-willow branches as they process around the > outside of the cathedral three times on the day before Palm Sunday. Why?? Faithfully, Rich  
(back) Subject: 128' stops From: "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 18 Dec 2004 08:26:57 +0100   Good morning,   I've been wondering for a while what effect a 128' or even 256' open wood pipe would have, if put on 200" of wind or so. Could it be usable as a weapon, wiping out underground bunkers? Or could it have a practical and more peaceful appliance?   Feel free to respond, but please don't tell your government ;-) Seriously, I'm really keen to learn about this. Perhaps it'd be easier to get an answer on a physics list?   Jarle http://jarle.moo.no  
(back) Subject: Breaking news - accompanied by a roll on the drums From: "Harry Grove" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> Date: Sat, 18 Dec 2004 07:38:43 -0000   Joy to the world; I have just received the Press Release from the Royal College of Organists announcing the selection of the builder for their new =   organ.   And I open the golden envelope, handed to me by my glamorous assistant (wearing a d=E9collet=E9, sequinned gown in the college's purple hall-mark =   colour - and doesn't he look good in it?) to reveal (amongst other things)...............   ORGELBAU GOLL of Lucerne, Switzerland   who will provide the College with " a richly symphonic organ of 48 stops over three manuals and pedal ...of great character and colour" A brochure giving a full specification will be available in the New Year.   Goll were apparently selected "through a rigorous process from a strong field of over 20 applicants." say Roy (Dr. Roy Massey MBE - President) and =   Pete (Peter Wright - President elect).   And I quote from 'their' web-site (and, since I too am a member, it's mine =   as well) ... http://www.rco.org.uk/ a.. The Recital Hall - the 270-seat concert hall will be built on land adjacent to the existing Curzon Street building. When completed it will be =   the only purpose-built organ venue in the UK. A key part of the design and =   development has been an extensive technical process of 'auralisation' to ensure the hall and the new organ are acoustically complementary. a.. A New RCO Organ - a =A3750,000 organ has been commissioned from Goll Orgelbau of Lucerne, Switzerland. Goll were selected following a rigorous process from a list of more than 20 applicants worldwide. The new organ, = as well as being musically outstanding, will also form an architectural = feature at Curzon Street, being visible from the outside of the building courtesy = of a striking glass wall. a.. The British Organ Library (BOL) - the new library will be formed by co-locating the existing Royal College of Organists' library with the British Organ Archive of the British Institute of Organ Studies. It will = be the library of national record for all types of material relating to the organ, its history, construction and repertoire. With its use of the = latest digital technologies and through links to scholarly libraries around the world, BOL will become a key international resource.   and all thanks to a (further) =A32.8 million grant from the Heritage = Lottery Fund.- making =A38.4M in the pot so far - from Birmingham City Council, European Development Fund, & Advantage West Midlands.   Any comments about Goll, anyone?   Christmas-y Greetings to the world   Harry Grove [a.k.a. a musicman preparing for a surfeit of carols]    
(back) Subject: RE: 128' stops From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Sat, 18 Dec 2004 20:50:26 +1300   >I've been wondering for a while what effect a 128' or even 256' open wood pipe would have, if put on 200" of wind or so. Could it be usable as a weapon, wiping out underground bunkers? Or could it have a practical and more peaceful appliance?   First, you'll have to go to Muirwoods outside San Francisco to get some (sequoia) trees long enough for your pipe speaking 2 cycles per second at CCCCCCC. You'll then need to come to New Zealand to get some 1200-year-old kauri trunks to provide timbers wide enough for the mouth parts. Then = you'll need to borrow the funnel of one of the big "Queen" ships to make a pipe foot. Then, get a Concorde motor to provide sufficient wind. Then, make a windchest about 25ft deep to get sufficient expansion gap between the world's biggest magnet and the upperboard (to be designed and made by you) to allow for good speech.   And then, you'll need to fold the whole paraphernalia up into a space of about 12cu.ft so you can take it by helicopter to a space where they won't mind you playing it.   Alternatively, you could ask a friendly sperm whale, oh, about 140ft long and weighing about 67 tons, to "speak" that low note for you, saving you = the trouble of making the pipe to the dimensions I've mentioned. You'll have = no trouble borrowing an Olympic swimming to get a pool enough to hold the whale, as there are quite a few of them in your country as in mine, but you'll need, at a guess, eight times the usual depth of water to hold your new pet CCCCCCC if it is not feel stranded. Borrow a makeover show team to do the work, or, perhaps, Hire-a-Hubby.   Should be a cinch. Let me know how it turns out.......................   Ross    
(back) Subject: RE: Breaking news - accompanied by a roll on the drums From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Sat, 18 Dec 2004 20:52:35 +1300   >Any comments about Goll, anyone? [big snip about costings]   Is it 1 April already?   Ross      
(back) Subject: Re: 128' stops From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Sat, 18 Dec 2004 04:39:08 EST   Ross:   The earth we all stand on, according to geo-scientists resonates 30 octaves below middle C That would take quite a while between waves from the earth's core.   Just a little science stuff, food for thought.   Ron Severin