PipeChat Digest #5015 - Saturday, December 18, 2004
 
Re: St John's Holland Road and other things
  by "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr>
RE: 128' stops
  by "Garrison Johnson" <johnco18@comcast.net>
32,64,128 footers etc. - vaguely on-topic
  by "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com>
Re: 128' stops as WMD's
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: 128' stops - and the Fundaton!
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
128ft WMD's - almost on topic
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Noise before substance
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: 128' stops
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
Re: Weird Pedal Stops
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Re: Noise before substance
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
RE: Weird Pedal Stops
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: Noise before substance
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Noise before substance
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Christmas present
  by "Keith Zimmerman" <kwzimmerman@alltel.net>
Re: 128' stops
  by "Paul Smith" <kipsmith@getgoin.net>
RE: 128' stops
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Noise before substance
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: 128' stops
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: 128' stops
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: Re: St John's Holland Road and other things From: "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr> Date: Sat, 18 Dec 2004 22:30:11 +0200   Dear List,   It's nice to have time at the weekend to read the posts in more detail - = and there certainly are plenty of them! St John's Holland Road is a wonderful building - and I had a feeling it was Henry Willis III - but in view of Colin Mitchell's hardly complimentary remarks on poor old HW the Third I thought I'd wait. It was the venue of one of the three most magical = recitals I have ever been to - Bob Griffiths playing the Three Franck Chorals and Messiaen's "La Nativite". The trouble about being on this list for so long is that I have mentioned this before - it's a bit like vicar's sermons - they tend to come round every two years (sometimes even, every one!) The condition of the organ = was not that outstanding in 1976 or so when the "Concert from Altenberg Abbey" =   was made - there are one or two electrical faults - but it still sounded great. I remember Ross's original comments on the service he went to = there! I wonder what the organ's like today.   I got to thinking about the G D & B organs - St Paul's Girl's School, Hammersmith, has a beautiful one, as does the Servite Priory in Fulham - designed, like the Walker organ Alan Taylor mentioned at St John's, Duncan =   Terrace, Islington, by Alan Harverson.   Colin mentioned the poor quality of organ building in the UK after the war = - this is true - materials were in short supply, new ideas had not yet filtered through, and although the Germans may not have seen it in this light, they were lucky in having had many of their Churches destroyed, and =   were able to build anew from scratch! They paid a Church Tax, and so there =   was no shortage of money. German organ building went through a boom = period. The allies won the war, but not the peace! Not much money around. Do you remember sweets being rationed? However things began to improve in the 60's - and Walkers built some very good organs then, apart from the = Oratory and Duncan Terrace, such as The Italian Church in Clerkenwell, a very good =   little tracker action organ in St Joseph's Church in the Balls Pond Road, Islington, another one in an RC Church in Docklands whose name escapes me and others.   Just a final thought - I am told that in Russia, Santa Claus carries a = pink pig under his arm. Can this be true? What's it got to do with organs? Absolutely nothing!   John Foss http://www.organsandorganistsonline.com/      
(back) Subject: RE: 128' stops From: "Garrison Johnson" <johnco18@comcast.net> Date: Sat, 18 Dec 2004 15:46:08 -0500   Let's take another look: middle C (2')=3D256 Hz two octaves down, 8' C then =3D 64 Hz 16' C =3D 32 Hz 32" C =3D 16 Hz 64' C =3D 8 Hz, still (barely) audible As far as producing these low notes electronically, no problem with generating them (oscillators), but try to find a speaker which will reproduce them. A 32' stop requires a big box and a couple of at least 18" speakers!   Jennie Mae & Garry J. The Johnsons 1913 Rockcreek Lane Flint MI 48507-2274 voice (810)233-7094 fax (810)233-7599   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of Colin Mitchell Sent: Saturday, December 18, 2004 3:08 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: 128' stops     Hello,   I've been trying to find reference to it, but I recall that low frequency sound was investigated as a weapon. Apparently, low frequency sound makes human beings become disorientated and neauseus.   Working on it Jarle.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Jarle Fagerheim <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:   > I'm still wondering about the effects of producing a > loud (though > non-audible to humans) sound in a gigantic (128'++) > organ pipe.       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The all-new My Yahoo! - Get yours free! http://my.yahoo.com       ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>    
(back) Subject: 32,64,128 footers etc. - vaguely on-topic From: "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com> Date: Sat, 18 Dec 2004 13:17:43 -0800   First, just a minor correction in some misstated physics.   a 32-foot CCCC tone vibrates at approximately* 16cps (cycles per second), not 8 as was stated. (*it's actually some long mouthful of a number, e.g., 16.2345786542 or sompin like dat)   a 64-foot CCCCC tone vibrates at approximately 8cps and yes, you can count the beats per second if you can talk very fast.   -----   Leopold Stokowski was fascinated with extremely low musical tones and experimented with various ways to augment the Philadelphia orchestra with them, in particular for a performance of his transcription of D=E9bussy's Prelude #10 ("La Cathedrale engloutie").   One of his experiments was a special THEREMIN that generated tones that went down below the range of hearing.   Musicologist Nicholas Slonimsky wrote about this in his autobiography "Perfect Pitch." The instrument, specially made for him by Leon Theremin himself, was electronic of course and played through an amplifier and loud-speaker. The latter was a gigantic speaker of whatever type was used in the 1930s that, according to observers, looked like a large "window" -- the speaker cone was square or rectangular in shape and was mounted in a wooden frame of some sort. (No photos or specimens have survived that I know of.)   The instrument itself looked like a bizarre sort of stringless violin - a long. thin wooden neck with gears, pulleys and electronic doo-dads housed in a vaguely violin-shaped case at the bottom. The neck contained a strip of celluloid (or some-such) upon which one would play up and down, just as if it was a one-string string instrument.   (Leon Theremin also made similar instruments that produced tones in more traditional sonic ranges -- few of his original instruments exist but there is a whole subset of fanatics, er, devot=E9es who have built faithful reproductions of them and have actually played concerts on them -- for better or worse!)   The big day came for the new "super-bass" (or whatever it was called) to be demonstrated. The orchestra began playing, and on cue, the theremin-player [Karl Zeise, one of the orchestra's cellists] began playing his instrument. According to Slonimsky, pandemonium ensued --- the entire bass section began suffering from nausea and stomach distress inflicted by the powerful subbass tones!   Considering the experiment a disappointing failure, Stokowski mothballed the instrument and never used it again.   -----   Tones in the 128-foot range are inaudible but have been scientifically demonstrated to have an effect on both living and nonliving things. There is a whole "above top secret" technology involving weapons that generate ELFs -- "Extremely Low Frequencies" which are so low that you cannot hear them but are so powerful -- at many thousands of decibels -- that they have been proven to inflict fatal injuries.   One of the causes against which some environmentalists protest is the use of high-powered SONAR and ELF generators under water, ostensibly for such noble and benign causes as mapping the ocean floor but, if you subscribe to any of a variety of conspiracy theories, are actually being put to use for much more diabolical reasons. But whatever the purpose, the side effects on ocean life, including whales and dolphins, is well documented.   -----   Then as to structural matters, Nikola Tesla -- another "legend" in the world of fringe science -- developed a number of devices that would, with acoustic vibration, demolish structures. One of them was no smaller than a deck of playing cards. One night he wandered into a remote section of town, attached his little device to a structure, switched it on, and hurried off. In a matter of moments he heard the crashing sound that indicated the structure had fallen. I do not recall the specifics of this device except that somehow it generated a pulse of some sort that was sympathetically amplified by whatever object it was attached to, ever stronger and stronger, until the object was shaken apart by the vibrations.   Stranger than truth? Perhaps so. I am sure plenty of poo-pooers will dismiss this anecdote as science-fiction ("contempt prior to investigation"). However, even the most cursory bit of research will dig up the facts on this and reveal its veracity.   -----   A final note: At one of my churches, among my complement of instruments I have a Roland D-10 synth that has several 32-foot tones on it. It also has a transposer with a 2-octave range. So, I can at least in theory produce 128-foot tones on it. The most effective of these timbres is a "bass sax." In the 128-foot range, it sounds like some sort of machinery rumbling away.   I have experimented with playing very soft notes on it during services (secretly of course!), letting it throttle away under full String Slush, trying to see if those low tones would have any kind of effect on anyone.   So far, the results have been inconclusive. People have gotten up and left, but that may have been due to any number of things - including the rendition as a whole!   And So It Goes.   ~ C      
(back) Subject: Re: 128' stops as WMD's From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 18 Dec 2004 14:45:16 -0800 (PST)   Hello, --- Jarle Fagerheim <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:   > > Why, are you dissatified with your present > building/organ combination? ;) > If it's possible to hit "the right frequency" and > ruin a building with a > 128', and my organ had a Great Grand Bourdon 64 (to > be realistic), I > could get everything as I'd like -- if somebody > dared to disagree with > me, I'd just wire a resultant! > > Jarle > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Take Yahoo! Mail with you! Get it on your mobile phone. http://mobile.yahoo.com/maildemo  
(back) Subject: Re: 128' stops - and the Fundaton! From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 18 Dec 2004 17:45:31 +0000   On 12/18/04 6:17 PM, "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> wrote:   > Jarle is MUCH too young to remember the Fundaton, so here is a repeat of = the > whole sorry story! >=20 Oh, Will; you=B9re great. Thanks. (Not only is he too young to remember it; he was too young then to be EXPOSED to some parts of it=8Bas I recall.) I know him and his mom, Bodil, and hope she won=B9t mind my =B3authorising=B2 his viewing of the sordid details.   Alan        
(back) Subject: 128ft WMD's - almost on topic From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 18 Dec 2004 14:49:08 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Charlie Lester's reply to Jarle's question was very interesting.   I'm learning something about infrasonics here, and I came across the "facts" (I will have to verify this somehow) that Whales communicate using infrasonic sounds, and elephants are believed to hear from 0.1Hz....that's one tenth of Hz, just in case you thought I had made a typo.   Someone mentioned open car windows as source of sub-sonics, and this can be very distressing.   Jet engines seem to be able to create sub-sonics, by creating a vortex which, as the charged air loses energy, seems to be capable of near thunder effects.   My own personal exposure to strange low sounds is restricted to a disco, where two very large, very powerful, oil-cooled speakers were situated at an angle each to the other and possibly out of phase. Between them, they sent shock waves through my entire chest cavity, and I soon started feeling quite ill. The speakers seemed to be setting up a sub-sonic pulse which I felt but could not hear.   Even a 32ft Open Wood at close quarters can be quite unpleasant.   Anyway, to keep this on topic, there is wonderfully prententious piece of writing which I came across, which relates to Messaien and the organ, as well as what seems to be a serious article on sub-sonic weapons.   http://www.borderlands.com/archives/arch/gavreaus.htm   http://www.forteantimes.com/articles/153_sonicweapons.shtml   "Tremble thou Earth at the presence of the God of Jacob"   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Send holiday email and support a worthy cause. Do good. http://celebrity.mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Noise before substance From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sat, 18 Dec 2004 18:05:31 -0500   Is there hope for a day in the future when organists will want a complete = and colorful pedal department, with a full palette of useful 16' and 8' = stops, before they demand a battery of 32' stops, real or otherwise?   Why the waste of time, money, and energy on attempting to stopper a 16' = open wood just to get eight or ten wheezing notes of an unsuccessful 32' = Bourdon, when the 16' open, left "as is," would have a dozen times the = versatility and impact?   When we speak of 128' stops, or multiple 32' stops, as if children in a = toy shop, we must plead with greater ferocity to be taken seriously as = musicians.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City Well, currently in Oranjestad, but headed back soon   ..  
(back) Subject: Re: 128' stops From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Sat, 18 Dec 2004 18:17:52 -0500   What I meant was... it sounds like you are scheming to add a 128' stop to your organ, in order to bring the building down so you can start over. :) = Not a bad idea if you're not happy with the current organ and accoustics, but email me offlist for some cheaper ideas for accomplishing the same = thing.   Just kidding   Andy   On Sat, 18 Dec 2004 19:37:23 +0100, Jarle Fagerheim wrote > > Why, are you dissatified with your present building/organ combination? ;) > If it's possible to hit "the right frequency" and ruin a building > with a 128', and my organ had a Great Grand Bourdon 64 (to be > realistic), I could get everything as I'd like -- if somebody dared > to disagree with me, I'd just wire a resultant! > > Jarle > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related > topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>       A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Weird Pedal Stops From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Sun, 19 Dec 2004 07:50:09 +0800   16 times per second. The 64' in Sydney Town Hall beats at 8. BE ----- Original Message ----- From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, December 19, 2004 1:22 AM Subject: Re: Weird Pedal Stops     > Ross et al: > > Unless I miss my guess a 32' octave beats eight times per second. > That seems to be the ultimate limit to practicality. In that range > the waves are more felt than heard. It causes the floor to shake, > and the bottoms in the pews get a fairly decent vibrator treatment. > It does produce an emotional rush and a feeling of the power of > this unique instrument. > > Ron > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >  
(back) Subject: Re: Noise before substance From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sat, 18 Dec 2004 15:57:37 -0800   Indeed. A good, old, solid 16' Open Wood is worth its weight in silver, at least. I had one of heroic scale in the '20s Austin at Old St. Mary's, and I never missed having a 32' stop. It shook the floor of the church QUITE satisfactorily (grin).   Cheers,   Bud   TubaMagna@aol.com wrote:   > Is there hope for a day in the future when organists will want a > complete and colorful pedal department, with a full palette of useful > 16' and 8' stops, before they demand a battery of 32' stops, real or > otherwise? > > Why the waste of time, money, and energy on attempting to stopper a > 16' open wood just to get eight or ten wheezing notes of an > unsuccessful 32' Bourdon, when the 16' open, left "as is," would have > a dozen times the versatility and impact? > > When we speak of 128' stops, or multiple 32' stops, as if children in > a toy shop, we must plead with greater ferocity to be taken seriously > as musicians. > > Sebastian M. Gluck New York City Well, currently in Oranjestad, but > headed back soon > > . > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for > pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : > http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: > <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: > <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: > <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >    
(back) Subject: RE: Weird Pedal Stops From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Sun, 19 Dec 2004 13:43:13 +1300   >16 times per second. The 64' in Sydney Town Hall beats at 8.   Yes, mais oui, true.   Ross    
(back) Subject: RE: Noise before substance From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Sun, 19 Dec 2004 13:46:14 +1300   >Indeed. A good, old, solid 16' Open Wood is worth its weight in silver, at least. I had one of heroic scale in the '20s Austin at Old St. Mary's, and I never missed having a 32' stop. It shook the floor of the church QUITE satisfactorily (grin).   And the same Ralph Downes we were talking about insisted, demanded, wheedled, shouted and screamed and yelled until he had the stunning open wood 32ft at Gloucester Cathedral (hidden up in the triforium, from whence it was mightily effective) cut up and destroyed, on the grounds that it didn't fit his concept of what the organ in that glorious cathedral should sound like. Since then, a 32ft reed and some 32ft mutations have been = added, but the open mighty 32ft is still missed. Downes missed the bus there, completely.   Sadly...   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: Noise before substance From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 18 Dec 2004 17:20:46 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Well, for some of us, it's that time of year!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- TubaMagna@aol.com wrote:   > When we speak of 128' stops, or multiple 32' stops, > as if children in a toy shop, we must plead with > greater ferocity to be taken seriously as musicians.     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Christmas present From: "Keith Zimmerman" <kwzimmerman@alltel.net> Date: Sat, 18 Dec 2004 21:26:50 -0500   List,   I would like to encourage everyone to purchase the CD of Seb's organ for = the Alexander Chapel of First Presbyterian Church, New York City. It would = make a nice Christmas present. I've just about worn mine out (it's a good = thing it's a CD instead of an LP). I've enjoyed it immensely. I've probably played Rich's "Tale of Two Organs" several more times, but that's because I've owned it longer.   http://www.glucknewyork.com/alexander/alexander.html   I would be interested in knowing about recordings of small pipe organs - less than 15 ranks. I have "Historic Organs of Portland". My reason for wanting recordings of small organs is that I'd like to hear many different pieces of music being played on organs that approach the size that I could conceivably have in my home. I posed this question last year and several people referred me to various "general" sources such as OHS. = Unfortunately, I'm not familiar enough with the world's organs to know the size of the organ in the recording - so I'm left with wanting specific = recommendations.   Merry Christmas, Keith Zimmerman    
(back) Subject: Re: 128' stops From: "Paul Smith" <kipsmith@getgoin.net> Date: Sat, 18 Dec 2004 20:39:02 -0600   Gee, if you are going to all that trouble for one note, do you think the whale could be taught to sing the whole 128' octave? On cue?? Failing = that, maybe we should consider making it a short octave. Maybe a very short = octave of only one note? ----- Original Message ----- From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, December 18, 2004 1:50 AM Subject: RE: 128' stops     > >I've been wondering for a while what effect a 128' or even 256' open > wood pipe would have, if put on 200" of wind or so. Could it be usable > as a weapon, wiping out underground bunkers? Or could it have a > practical and more peaceful appliance? > > First, you'll have to go to Muirwoods outside San Francisco to get some > (sequoia) trees long enough for your pipe speaking 2 cycles per second = at > CCCCCCC. You'll then need to come to New Zealand to get some = 1200-year-old > kauri trunks to provide timbers wide enough for the mouth parts. Then > you'll > need to borrow the funnel of one of the big "Queen" ships to make a pipe > foot. Then, get a Concorde motor to provide sufficient wind. Then, make = a > windchest about 25ft deep to get sufficient expansion gap between the > world's biggest magnet and the upperboard (to be designed and made by = you) > to allow for good speech. > > And then, you'll need to fold the whole paraphernalia up into a space of > about 12cu.ft so you can take it by helicopter to a space where they = won't > mind you playing it. > > Alternatively, you could ask a friendly sperm whale, oh, about 140ft = long > and weighing about 67 tons, to "speak" that low note for you, saving you =   > the > trouble of making the pipe to the dimensions I've mentioned. You'll have =   > no > trouble borrowing an Olympic swimming to get a pool enough to hold the > whale, as there are quite a few of them in your country as in mine, but > you'll need, at a guess, eight times the usual depth of water to hold = your > new pet CCCCCCC if it is not feel stranded. Borrow a makeover show team = to > do the work, or, perhaps, Hire-a-Hubby. > > Should be a cinch. Let me know how it turns out....................... > > Ross > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > > >      
(back) Subject: RE: 128' stops From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Sun, 19 Dec 2004 15:57:37 +1300     >Gee, if you are going to all that trouble for one note, do you think the whale could be taught to sing the whole 128' octave? On cue?? Failing = that, maybe we should consider making it a short octave. Maybe a very short = octave   of only one note?   Well, as someone once said, you need a chorus of them:   Doubloon Oon Tenoroon Bassoon.   I'm not sure about just one note, though. I expect, thinking hard, that = you we might first try not an octave but a septave. If that's OK, then perhaps = a sextave, then a quintave, then a quadave, then a tridave, then a duodave. Heck, the next note would appear to B.   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: Noise before substance From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Sat, 18 Dec 2004 21:31:44 -0600     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, December 18, 2004 5:57 PM Subject: Re: Noise before substance     > Indeed. A good, old, solid 16' Open Wood is worth its weight in silver, > at least. I had one of heroic scale in the '20s Austin at Old St. > Mary's, and I never missed having a 32' stop. It shook the floor of the > church QUITE satisfactorily (grin).   I am a big fan of 16' Open Woods too. The organ in my public school = chapel in England had a very nice one, which was also available as an 8' Octave Wood. This made me a fan of 8' extensions of Open Woods too. There is nothing quite like an 8' Octave Wood for giving a Pedal line clarity. (Curiously enough, I have come across a couple of 19th.-century American organs that had an 8' Open Wood as the only pedal stop.)   The Open Wood in my school chapel was also available at 10.2/3' pitch, but this was "de trop." It would have been much better to make the 32' resultant by using the 16' Bourdon at 10.2/3'.   John Speller      
(back) Subject: Re: 128' stops From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Sat, 18 Dec 2004 21:35:33 -0600     ----- Original Message ----- From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, December 18, 2004 8:57 PM Subject: RE: 128' stops > Well, as someone once said, you need a chorus of them: > > Doubloon > Oon > Tenoroon > Bassoon.   Not to mention Basement, Tenement, etc.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: 128' stops From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 18 Dec 2004 19:46:13 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   The "Orcarina" in polyphonic form, is not based on a killer whale at all, but on a sperm whale; the blow spout of which serves as a variable valve for the purposes of altering pitch.   This fiendishly clever register is not only capable of a full polyphonic octave at 128ft, it is also capable of attractive glissandi; not far removed from the mating call of the marine mammal in its natural habitat.   Of course, being such a fundamental stop, the "Orcarina" needs to be complemented by a Mixture stop or two, derived from a whole family of porpoises (the Phocoena Grave) and dolphins ( the Lagenorhynchus acutus) though the two families cannot be placed on adjacent sunken-chests without some degree of fighting taking place.   The reed tones are currently experimental owing to training difficulties, but the "Contra Eumetopias Jubatus" 32ft is in the final stages of tonal finishing.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       --- Paul Smith <kipsmith@getgoin.net> wrote:   > Gee, if you are going to all that trouble for one > note, do you think the > whale could be taught to sing the whole 128' octave? > On cue??   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com