PipeChat Digest #5016 - Sunday, December 19, 2004
 
The Catholic "Grosser Gott"
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Re: The Catholic "Grosser Gott"
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com>
WTB
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
Re: 128' stops
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com>
Re: Weird Pedal Stops
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com>
Re: 128' stops
  by "Peter Rodwell" <iof@ctv.es>
More from O & O O
  by "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr>
 

(back) Subject: The Catholic "Grosser Gott" From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Sat, 18 Dec 2004 22:42:01 -0600   Hi,   I was practicing for church tomorrow and I decided to play a few others too just for fun. One of the ones I was playing around with was Grosser Gott (Holy God We Praise Thy Name). My hymnal (Catholic) gives 8 bar repeat that Catholics traditionally sing, but it doesn't give the few ornaments that we traditionally add. (And it's the only Catholic hymnal that I've seen that even has the repeat.) Does anyone know why Catholics traditionally repeat those eight measures? Where did the extra notes come from and why don't we write it the way we sing it?   Alicia      
(back) Subject: Re: The Catholic "Grosser Gott" From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> Date: Sun, 19 Dec 2004 15:34:14 +0800   "Grosser Gott, Wir Loben Dich" 7.8.7.8.7.7. (?) The notes in my Trinity Hym= nal indicate that the song is from the Katholisches Gesangbuch, (Catholic S= ongbook) Vienna, ca. 1774.   The UCC/New Century Hymnal adds: Alt. Johann Gottfried Schict, 1819 (for th= e music)=20   It states, "This German Catholic hymn, based on the Te Deum Laudamus, appea= red with this tune in a hymnal published by command of Austrian empress Mar= ia Theresa. In the nineteenth century it became popular in Protestant worsh= ip."   I'm assuming that the last eight measures are the repeat ... I've never see= n/heard it arranged that way or with any ornementation. (of course, I am Pr= otestant.)   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Subject: The Catholic "Grosser Gott" Date: Sat, 18 Dec 2004 22:42:01 -0600   > Hi, >=20 > I was practicing for church tomorrow and I decided to play a few others > too just for fun. One of the ones I was playing around with was Grosser > Gott (Holy God We Praise Thy Name). My hymnal (Catholic) gives 8 bar > repeat that Catholics traditionally sing, but it doesn't give the few > ornaments that we traditionally add. (And it's the only Catholic hymnal > that I've seen that even has the repeat.) Does anyone know why > Catholics traditionally repeat those eight measures? Where did the > extra notes come from and why don't we write it the way we sing it? >=20 > Alicia   -- Jan Nijhuis nijhuis@email.com   --=20 ___________________________________________________________ Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm    
(back) Subject: WTB From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Sun, 19 Dec 2004 01:40:12 -0600   Friends:   I would be interested in acquiring originals of any of the following titles for Organ solo should any here have one they should with to sell. The items in question are all by Dr. Arthur John Baynon.   Triumph Song (1916) Festal Toccata (1918) Scherzo-Caprice (1920) Grand Choeur (1921) Nuptial Souvenir (1933)   Regards,   [Mr.] Noel Stoutenburg Dallas, TX USA          
(back) Subject: Re: 128' stops From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> Date: Sun, 19 Dec 2004 15:46:29 +0800   I've found that "Doublement" is often mispronounced "Doublemint" and "Altom= ent" is misspelled "Allotment" on the drawknob.   I'm not sure if it's a stop on the "Large Hot Pipe Organ" (http://www.lhpo.= org/) Purists won't like it because it is MIDI controlled.   ----- Original Message ----- From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>   > > Well, as someone once said, you need a chorus of them: > > > > Doubloon > > Oon > > Tenoroon > > Bassoon. >=20 > Not to mention Basement, Tenement, etc. >=20 > John Speller   -- Jan Nijhuis nijhuis@email.com   --=20 ___________________________________________________________ Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm    
(back) Subject: Re: Weird Pedal Stops From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> Date: Sun, 19 Dec 2004 16:18:30 +0800   Tim Storms, a member of the Christian a capella group "Rescue" (www.rescuem= inistries.com) currently holds the record for that note by a human ... From= their press packet pdf file:   "Their sound is comprised of four young men: Jason Overstreet, Jay McKenney= , Mitch Fewell, and their bass, Tim Storms, who holds the Guinness World Re= cord for the lowest note produced by a human! (The note is two octaves belo= w the lowest B on the piano =96 8 Hz.)"     ----- Original Message ----- From: bobelms <bobelms@westnet.com.au> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Subject: Re: Weird Pedal Stops Date: Sun, 19 Dec 2004 07:50:09 +0800   >=20 > 16 times per second. The 64' in Sydney Town Hall beats at 8. > BE > ----- Original Message ----- From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> > To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Sunday, December 19, 2004 1:22 AM > Subject: Re: Weird Pedal Stops >=20 >=20 > > Ross et al: > > > > Unless I miss my guess a 32' octave beats eight times per second. > > That seems to be the ultimate limit to practicality. In that range > > the waves are more felt than heard. It causes the floor to shake, > > and the bottoms in the pews get a fairly decent vibrator treatment. > > It does produce an emotional rush and a feeling of the power of > > this unique instrument. > > > > Ron ******************************************************************   -- Jan Nijhuis nijhuis@email.com   --=20 ___________________________________________________________ Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm    
(back) Subject: Re: 128' stops From: "Peter Rodwell" <iof@ctv.es> Date: Sun, 19 Dec 2004 09:40:39 +0100   Helicopters are very good producers of low frequency sound, especially the Bells with two main rotor blades such as the 205 (Huey in its military version) and 206 (JetRanger/LongRanger series). Most of the noise from a turbine-powered helicopter comes from the main rotor. Perhaps a more mathematically- minded list member than me could calculate the frequency from such a rotor (typically spinning at 330 rpm).   Peter (who has been known to prune the occasional tree with the main blades).    
(back) Subject: More from O & O O From: "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr> Date: Sun, 19 Dec 2004 11:56:35 +0200   Tim has just updated the site for the week - apparently Jared has been working on his school project on the computer and Dad didn't get much of a =   look in last week!   As you probably know, Organs and Organists Online is a non commercial organisation ; we do not accept advertising or receive any financial support - but if you would like to help a worthwhile cause, where all = money given goes directly to benefit children, may I bring to your attention the =   charity, BENJAMIN, which supports orphaned children in Serbia and Greece.   The conflict in Serbia left many children homeless and without parents. = You can read all about the work done by this outstanding organisation by clicking on the link on our Home Page. Harry Anastasiou, who, with his = wife Joan, founded the Charity in 1994, was himself brought up in the orphanage =   in Katerini, the town in which I live, before first emigrating to = Australia, and then via Canada to the United States, where he worked in the Computer industry. He returned to Katerini determined to do something for those children who were orphans of war, and now helps support 140 children. The charity has strong links with the USA, from where the finance for the original Evangelical Church and Orphanage in Katerini came through the American Missionary Society.   This week we have added five files to the music downloads - Timothy Grenz and Aarnoud de Groen playing Bach, Gregory Ceurvorst playing Messiaen, Jon =   Fjellestad playing another of his improvisations and I am to be heard this =   time at a Wurlitzer in reflective mood. It's the Dendy theatre in Melbourne - a historic III/15 instrument, dating back to 1924, complete = with full length 32' up in the roof - not long enough to be used as a WMD, but deep enough to make the bench shake! These recordings are a bit like = holiday snapshots, really. Bill Glasson said to me the previous evening "An early start tomorrow, John. We have the Dendy theatre from 8 a.m. but must be = out by 10 am as it opens for business then." So, at a time when I would = normally be contemplating breakfaast, we put the mini disk recorder on the front = seat and I rambled away unrehearsed for a couple of hours - just a few titles scribbled on a piece of paper the previous evening. "I play from music = like that", said Bill Hester, who had got up even earlier to get the console = out and the blower on - the organ is in pristine condition, though a bit muted =   as the theatre is half its original size and the organ speaks from behind = a set of heavy velvet curtains. The second touch is on the sensitive side, = so a few notes on the Tuba and the Solo to Great coupler appear in whimsical fashion from time to time, but it is interesting to compare the sound with =   the Compton at Malvern - a far more forthright instrument, due to its = siting and the building as much as anything.   Also recommended for those of you who have a trumpeter at your disposal is =   Krebs "Wachet Auf" arranged for Organ and Trumpet in B flat by Timothy = Grenz in the SCORES section.   I am just listening to Greg's playing of the Messiaen - excellent, Greg! Don't forget the Charpentier for Organ and Trumpet added last week with Jared Grenz on Trumpet - described by Jarle Fagerheim, who has had quite a =   good look in on Pipechat this week, as "phenomenal".   Have a good week! It's usually pretty busy at this time of year - and I am =   sure that all on the list are no exception!   John Foss http://www.organsandorganistsonline.com/