PipeChat Digest #5020 - Monday, December 20, 2004
 
Re: 128' stops
  by "James Grebe" <pianoman@accessus.net>
Re: Weird Pedal Stops
  by "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net>
St John's Holland Road
  by "alantaylor1" <alantaylor1@members.v21.co.uk>
Re: the Roman Catholic Embassy chapels of the U.K.
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
RE: St John's Anglican Church, Wainuiomata, New Zealand
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
Re: PipeChat Digest #50173456987235674234958762345
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
PipeChat IRC this evening,
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Re: Subject Headings in Numbers.
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Helmeted Vikings
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Helmeted Vikings
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
Re: Computer geeks discover the Disney organ
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
Re: Grosser Gott
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
Re: The Catholic  "Grosser Gott"
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Re: The Catholic  "Grosser Gott"
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Re: The old organ of Stavanger Cathedral (x-post)
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com>
Re: The Catholic "Grosser Gott"
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Re: The Catholic "Grosser Gott"
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Catholic Grosser Gott
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
RE: Console Accessories
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
Re: The old organ of Stavanger Cathedral (x-post)
  by "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk>
Christmas Day Organ Recital in Allentown
  by "Stephen Williams" <stepwill@enter.net>
Re: 128' stops
  by "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: Re: 128' stops From: "James Grebe" <pianoman@accessus.net> Date: Mon, 20 Dec 2004 05:49:20 -0600   Re: 128' stopsIt is true about low frequency vibrations. I am a piano = tuner, and my church clients where the bell room or choir room is next = to the air handling systems is always a difficult place to concentrate = ON TUNING AS WELL AS DEALING WITH THE VERY LOW VIBRATIONS PRESENT IN THE = AIR HANDLING SYSTEMS PREVALENT TO DAY. they ARE CAUSING ALMOST = UNRECOGNIZABLE SOUND BELOW 30 Hz. Excuse the caps. It is very early. Jim James Grebe Piano-Forte Tuning & Repair Creator of Handsome Hardwood Caster Cups (314) 608-4137 WWW.JamesGrebe.com 1526 Raspberry Lane Arnold, MO 63010 BECOME WHAT YOU BELIEVE! pianoman@accessus.net ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Alan Freed=20 To: PipeChat=20 Sent: Sunday, December 19, 2004 2:37 PM Subject: Re: 128' stops     On 12/18/04 8:07 PM, "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:   > Apparently, low frequency sound makes human beings become = disorientated and=20 > neauseus. >=20 > Working on it Jarle. >=20 I don't know, Colin. Shouldn't somebody be checking into Jarle's = political proclivities before he gets "armed" beyond the point of our = being able to regretfully withdraw from such military advisory roles? = Just think back to that LAST time those Vikings visited Britain! =20   Alan   (P.S.: More likely "nauseated" than "nauseous." That which is the = latter causes the former.)
(back) Subject: Re: Weird Pedal Stops From: "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net> Date: Mon, 20 Dec 2004 07:41:22 -0500 (Eastern Standard Time)   Hi List,=0D =0D Wasn't there an attempt by Midmer-Losh to have a Reed and a Diaphone Beater for each of the resonators so they could be used as a Diaphone or = a Dulzian? =0D =0D Would you like a fan or a valve tremolo for that 64'?=0D =0D I just finished moving a Holtkamp Martini myself, man am I tired...=0D =0D - Nathan
(back) Subject: St John's Holland Road From: "alantaylor1" <alantaylor1@members.v21.co.uk> Date: Mon, 20 Dec 2004 13:42:10 -0000     St John's Holland Roads splendid organ, is kept going by the heroic = efforts of the Shepherd Bros. Without their tender care it would have ceased to function years ago.   The Shepherd Bros, John and Eric Shepherd are a living organ legend in the UK. They specialize, by accident rather then design, in keeping organs = that are passed the point of terminal illness, alive. They also build new = organs. Recently finishing a beautiful 2 manual tracker organ in North London. = They also, many years ago, totally transformed a bog standard 1950s Walker, = into a wonderful French inspired organ. Notre Dame in Leicester Square, London. Eric is at present President of the UK's "Organ Club"   John mentions the Pond Road organ. This church has a strange address and title. Our Lady and St Joseph's Balls, Pond Road, Islington.   Alan London   It's nice to have time at the weekend to read the posts in more detail - = and   There certainly are plenty of them! St John's Holland Road is a wonderful building - and I had a feeling it was Henry Willis III - but in view of Colin Mitchell's hardly complimentary remarks on poor old HW the Third I thought I'd wait. It was the venue of one of the three most magical = recitals   I have ever been to - Bob Griffiths playing the Three Franck Chorals and Messiaen's "La Nativite". The trouble about being on this list for so long is that I have mentioned this before - it's a bit like vicar's sermons - they tend to come round every two years (sometimes even, every one!) The condition of the organ = was not that outstanding in 1976 or so when the "Concert from Altenberg Abbey" =   was made - there are one or two electrical faults - but it still sounded great. I remember Ross's original comments on the service he went to = there! I wonder what the organ's like today.   I got to thinking about the G D & B organs - St Paul's Girl's School, Hammersmith, has a beautiful one, as does the Servite Priory in Fulham - designed, like the Walker organ Alan Taylor mentioned at St John's, Duncan Terrace, Islington, by Alan Harverson.   Colin mentioned the poor quality of organ building in the UK after the war = -   this is true - materials were in short supply, new ideas had not yet filtered through, and although the Germans may not have seen it in this light, they were lucky in having had many of their Churches destroyed, and were able to build anew from scratch! They paid a Church Tax, and so there was no shortage of money. German organ building went through a boom = period. The allies won the war, but not the peace! Not much money around. Do you remember sweets being rationed? However things began to improve in the = 60's - and Walkers built some very good organs then, apart from the Oratory and Duncan Terrace, such as The Italian Church in Clerkenwell, a very good little tracker action organ in St Joseph's Church in the Balls Pond Road, Islington, another one in an RC Church in Docklands whose name escapes me and others.   Just a final thought - I am told that in Russia, Santa Claus carries a = pink pig under his arm. Can this be true? What's it got to do with organs? Absolutely nothing!   John Foss http://www.organsandorganistsonline.com/   -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.296 / Virus Database: 265.6.0 - Release Date: 17/12/2004    
(back) Subject: Re: the Roman Catholic Embassy chapels of the U.K. From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Mon, 20 Dec 2004 08:04:38 -0600   Samuel Wesley was indeed the organist of the Portuguese Embassy Chapel, where the music was some of the best in England. He succeeded to two = Samuel Webbe's, Jr. and Sr. Wesley's younger brother Charles Wesley, Jr., was = also for a short time organist of the Portuguese Embassy Chapel, although = unlike Samuel he was never a Roman Catholic. The rest of the family were, of course, Church of England, and still are. I was at in England school with Samuel Sebastian Wesley's great-grandson John.   John Speller     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, December 19, 2004 11:04 PM Subject: the Roman Catholic Embassy chapels of the U.K.     > I'm sure somebody has written about the organists, organs, and music of > the Roman Catholic Embassy chapels in London prior to the Act of > Toleration, but I've never come across anything much. It's a fascinating > period of English RC church music; evidently the musical establishments > were such that they could mount a performance of the Mozart Requiem for > Spohr's (?) funeral. Was it the "Catholic Wesley" (S.S.) who was > organist at the Portuguese Embassy chapel?      
(back) Subject: RE: St John's Anglican Church, Wainuiomata, New Zealand From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Mon, 20 Dec 2004 08:26:15 -0600   Certainly, and thank you!   Daniel     >I'll see what I can do, but I'll have to learn how to do this - and that >means after Christmas now..   >Ross  
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #50173456987235674234958762345 From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 20 Dec 2004 09:45:34 -0500   How difficult can it be to put a subject heading on posted messages? How = many times do list members have to ask people to engage in this common = courtesy? Does anybody REALLY think that we know what these numbers mean? = Does anybody believe that people enjoy having their time wasted, with the = repeated aggravation of this practice, no matter HOW many times it has = been blasted?  
(back) Subject: PipeChat IRC this evening, From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Mon, 20 Dec 2004 09:49:13 -0500   All members of PipeChat are invited to join us in the PipeChat IRC every Friday and Monday evening - beginning at 9.00 PM Eastern Time.   To find out more about the Chat room, or how to get into it, go to PipeChat-L web page at http://www.pipechat.org/   You will find out all you need to know to join us.   Tonight at 9.00 PM, - I hope that we will see you there.   Cheers,   Bob Conway In beautiful sunny, but chilly Kingston, Ontario, Canada, at minus 25 Celsius.   Minus 14 Fahrenheit for those who still live in the 19th Century              
(back) Subject: Re: Subject Headings in Numbers. From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Mon, 20 Dec 2004 09:55:21 -0500   Who ever does this, loses my attention, and I delete the message unread, - =   which is a waste of their time and my own. It takes no effort to actually place a textual subject heading in a = posting to the list.   Bob Conway   At 09:45 AM 12/20/2004, Tuba Magna wrote: >How difficult can it be to put a subject heading on posted messages? How >many times do list members have to ask people to engage in this common >courtesy? Does anybody REALLY think that we know what these numbers mean? =   >Does anybody believe that people enjoy having their time wasted, with the =   >repeated aggravation of this practice, no matter HOW many times it has >been blasted?      
(back) Subject: Helmeted Vikings From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 20 Dec 2004 10:26:06 +0000   On 12/20/04 3:32 AM, "RonSeverin@aol.com" <RonSeverin@aol.com> wrote:   > Are you in otherwords calli' that young fellow Jarle some kind a terroris= t? > Swedes, Norwegians, and Danes are very nice people until they put on thos= e > horned helmits and scut along on those little dragon ships of theirs.   I can=B9t wait for Jarle=B9s own reply to that apparent allegation. Actually, you=B9re quite right about the Scandinavian temperament; apparently a consequence of heavy infusions of Luther=B9s catechisms. As for politics, Jarle is not a na=EFf in that realm, but we haven=B9t really talked about it.   Alan          
(back) Subject: Re: Helmeted Vikings From: <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Mon, 20 Dec 2004 10:41:44 EST   Hello Alan, In reference to your comment:=20     I can=E2=80=99t wait for Jarle=E2=80=99s own reply to that apparent allegat= ion. Actually,=20 you=E2=80=99re quite right about the Scandinavian temperament; apparently a= =20 consequence of heavy infusions of Luther=E2=80=99s catechisms. As for poli= tics, Jarle is not=20 a na=C3=AFf in that realm, but we haven=E2=80=99t really talked about it. =20   Hmmm. *I* am of Swedish descent, AND I have both the horned helmet and the= =20 long braids. AND my brother's name is Viking! Just what can I get away=20 with? <g> =20 Victoria (blessedly anglicized spelling - great-aunt was Wicktoria)  
(back) Subject: Re: Computer geeks discover the Disney organ From: <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Mon, 20 Dec 2004 11:00:46 EST   Hello admin@pipechat.org,     In reference to your comment: >This URL was forwarded to me by a friend. The article is at a website = that >seems to be geared towards computer/internet geeks. It's about the = Disney >organ. Now if we can garner more interest from this group, then the survival >of the organ looks much less bleak. > >http://www.boingboing.net/2004/12/17/geeking_out_over_geh.html ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~   TommyLee,   What makes you think organist aren't geeks? <EG>   Victoria    
(back) Subject: Re: Grosser Gott From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Mon, 20 Dec 2004 11:10:48 -0500   Repeating the last line of this hymn is standard at St. Joseph Church, the German Catholic parish in Lancaster PA., where many older folks continue = to sing it _auf Deutsch_.   I began my OHS 2003 convention recital there with this hymn, which is like the parish's "national anthem!" We printed the text _auf Deutsch_ as well as _auf Englisch_, and I think the singing was half of each -- and with tremendous gusto!! And, yes, we repeated the final line.   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA    
(back) Subject: Re: The Catholic "Grosser Gott" From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Mon, 20 Dec 2004 10:22:52 -0600   I'm saying ornamented for no other reason than that I can't think of a better way to put it. Our hymnal for the 5th phrase reads "re mi| fa re| mi fa| sol" but everyone sings (and therefore every Catholic organist I've ever heard) plays "re (half) mi sol (2 eighths)| fa mi re (3 quarters)| mi (half) fa la (2 eighths)| sol". Alicia   -----Original Message----- From: Thomas Mohr <thomasmohr@aon.at> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Sun, 19 Dec 2004 11:38:22 +0100 Subject: Re: The Catholic "Grosser Gott"   > > > Subject: The Catholic "Grosser Gott" > > From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> > > Date: Sat, 18 Dec 2004 22:42:01 -0600 > > > > Hi, > > > > I was practicing for church tomorrow and I decided to play a few > others > > too just for fun. One of the ones I was playing around with was > Grosser > > Gott (Holy God We Praise Thy Name). My hymnal (Catholic) gives 8 > bar > > repeat that Catholics traditionally sing, but it doesn't give the few > > ornaments that we traditionally add. (And it's the only Catholic > hymnal > > that I've seen that even has the repeat.) Does anyone know why > > Catholics traditionally repeat those eight measures? Where did the > > extra notes come from and why don't we write it the way we sing it? > > > > Alicia > > Dear Alicia, > > I am Catholic and from Vienna, Austria from where this song originated. > I > regularly play "Grosser Gott" in our church. I have never heard of > repeating > the last 8 measures, except in the last verse where they are sometimes > repeated pleno organo, but this is at the organists discretion. The > hymnal we > use (used in Austria, Germany and Switzerland) does not have any > ornaments. > If you look at Max Reger (who was a Catholic) op 135a, 30 Little > Preludes for > Organ, which contains a prelude for "Grosser Gott", you don't find the > ornamentation in the c.f. either. > > I guess this must be some sort of a US resp. protestant specific > alteration. > > regads, > Thomas > -- > DI Thomas Mohr > Institute for Cancer Research > Medical University of Vienna > Borschkegasse 8a > A-1090 Vienna > > ++43 1 4277 65160 > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >      
(back) Subject: Re: The Catholic "Grosser Gott" From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Mon, 20 Dec 2004 10:24:59 -0600   It's the same as in the St. Gregory as far as I can remember. Alicia Zeilenga       -----Original Message----- From: Noel Stoutenburg <mjolnir@ticnet.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Sun, 19 Dec 2004 13:12:32 -0600 Subject: Re: The Catholic "Grosser Gott"   > Adding to what Stephen Best wrote: > > > When I encounter this in Protestant hymnals, there are no repeats or > > ornaments (not that I've inspected every Protestant hymnal). > > I own about 40 Protestant hymnals in speaking. Examining more than > half, including specimens from all tradtions (Lutheran, Anglican, > Methodist, Presbyterian), snf countries in my collection, the only > hymnal I see with the repeat is a recent Roman Cathoic one.Moreover, > the > older hymnal I own intended for Roman Catholic use, the St. Gregory of > Fr. Montani, does not contain the repeat, eithe. > > My best guess is that the practice of repeating the last line is an > instance of something done for expedience in one place which got picked > up as a more general tradition. It is not difficult at all for me to > imagine that this was music to accompany some activity, perhaps a > procession which was just a bit too short, but was just right if the > last line of each verse was repeated. Others heard this, liked it, and > replicated it. How is the tune in the St. Basil? > > ns > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >      
(back) Subject: Re: The old organ of Stavanger Cathedral (x-post) From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com> Date: Mon, 20 Dec 2004 11:33:21 -0500   At 11:03 PM 2004-12-19 +0100, you wrote: >Dear Chatters and Listers, > >I live quite close to the capital of South-Western Norway, Stavanger, home= =20 >to a wonderful old Norman/Gothic Cathedral with a not-so-wonderful organ.= =20 >The current organ is by Gebr. Reil of Holland, dating from 1991, which=20 >replaced a 1941/1948 Frobenius. My mother had first hand experience with=20 >it for several years, being a student of the cathedral organist Lars=20 >M=E6land. It was a very fine instrument, but unfortunately the pipes were= =20 >crammed in beneath the roof -- the gallery was to small for such a large=20 >instrument. When the EP action eventually broke down, it was decided to=20 >replace the whole thing, as restoring supposedly wouldn't be cheaper than= =20 >building a new instrument. Even though the space problem was solved by=20 >lowering the gallery, the Reil has been deservedly critisized ever since=20 >its completion. I won't go in detail about that one now, though.   Jarle,   What do you find wrong with the Reil Organ? There is one here in Ontario,= =20 Canada, that was put in about 1988, and although it does not sound bad, is= =20 not very exciting to listen to. Sort of Dutch baroque. It has the added=20 disadvantage of being located in an unfortunate acoustic.   But what I find most troubling about this instrument is the mechanics of=20 it. It is a hard machine to play. The keys are uneven, the pedal division= =20 speaks slow, and it is really hard to play fast on it. Canadian tracker=20 builders build much better actions than this instrument has.   Needless to say, Reil has not installed another one in Canada since.   Arie V.      
(back) Subject: Re: The Catholic "Grosser Gott" From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Mon, 20 Dec 2004 10:31:25 -0600   That's similar to what the DoM where I grew up told me. I think she told me more, but I don't remember very much. I'm trying to think of the "ornaments" in "Mother Dear". Did the unornamented one catch on? Alicia Zeilenga     -----Original Message----- From: RVScara@aol.com To: pipechat@pipechat.org Date: Sun, 19 Dec 2004 15:26:37 EST Subject: Re: The Catholic "Grosser Gott"   > As I recall, the ornamentals were in the oldest editions of the St > Basil > Hymnal but in a later revision, "to clean it up and make it more > liturgically > correct," a number of changes were made to several hymns including > Holy God and > Mother Dear O Pray for Me (which had similar ornamentals. That hymnal > was > "banned" in a number of areas, a lot of the complaints > coming from the Pittsburgh Diocese. I think Bud could comment on > that. I > still have 2 old editions and occasionally play some of the "oldies" > for the > senior members of the parish. > > Bob Scara > St Paul RC > Burlington, NJ >      
(back) Subject: Re: The Catholic "Grosser Gott" From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Mon, 20 Dec 2004 10:43:52 -0600   Dear > Bud, who still plays "Grosser Gott" with the repeat and the "flips" in > the melody >   So was it originally written with the "flips" and repeats? If so why wouldn't it be written that way in any Protestant hymnal I've seen? Seems like if it was a Catholic liturgical idea, they would have been free to do as they please.   I should ask my sister how the Reform branch of the family sang it for my Aunt's funeral. I played it at my mother's command and the Catholic way. No need for 2 deaths in the family ;-)   Alicia -still confused      
(back) Subject: Re: Catholic Grosser Gott From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Mon, 20 Dec 2004 10:48:58 -0600   What year is your hymnal? Just curious. Alicia Zeilenga   -----Original Message----- From: "Joe Elliffe" <jelli@tampabay.rr.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Sun, 19 Dec 2004 21:24:25 -0500 Subject: Catholic Grosser Gott   > Most of us long time Catholic organists were raised with the St Basil > Hymnal- The repeats and ornaments are in the music as written- I just > looked at my ancient hymnal and #3- Holy God We Praise Thy Name lists > Rev. C. Walworth for lyrics and P. Ritter for music- That's the one I > was raised with and I still play it that way      
(back) Subject: RE: Console Accessories From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Mon, 20 Dec 2004 11:01:48 -0600   No wonder your successor isn't comfortable with the situation. I wouldn't be, competent or not! (which is debatable)   Daniel   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Glenda Sent: Friday, December 17, 2004 7:17 PM To: 'PipeChat' Subject: RE: Console Accessories   The good Reverend and the recital committee asked me to come back and do a recital in February. Even after I left they presented me with keys to the church and the invitation to practice there as much as I want, in the hopes that I might come back. But as Thomas Wolfe entitled a novel .. . . .=20   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com  
(back) Subject: Re: The old organ of Stavanger Cathedral (x-post) From: "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 20 Dec 2004 18:41:20 +0100       Arie Vandenberg wrote: > What do you find wrong with the Reil Organ? There is one here in > Ontario, Canada, that was put in about 1988, and although it does not > sound bad, is not very exciting to listen to. Sort of Dutch baroque. > It has the added disadvantage of being located in an unfortunate = acoustic.   > But what I find most troubling about this instrument is the mechanics of =   > it. It is a hard machine to play. The keys are uneven, the pedal > division speaks slow, and it is really hard to play fast on it. > Canadian tracker builders build much better actions than this instrument =   > has. Except for the acoustics, which are excellent in Stavanger, your description fits the organ very well. I may also add that the action is extremely loud, and the pedal keys don't have dampers of any kind, so playing a Bach trio sonata sounds more like Riverdance. The console is huge, with a non-adjustable bench, making it a nightmare for many organists (especially women) to handle. Needless to say, there's no combination action of any kind. After its installation, the local newspaper reported that the congregation was entertained by the organist registering inbetween stanzas -- drawing a stop makes lots of noise. They really should have kept the Frobenius.   http://www.reil.nl/doc/orgeloverzicht/stavanger.html http://jarle.moo.no/stavanger_frobenius.txt   Jarle  
(back) Subject: Christmas Day Organ Recital in Allentown From: "Stephen Williams" <stepwill@enter.net> Date: Mon, 20 Dec 2004 12:46:28 -0500   Thought you might like to know . . . I will offer my 20th annual Christmas Day organ recital on Saturday at 3:00 p.m. at St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church in downtown Allentown, Pennsylvania.   These recitals began while I was a student at Westminster Choir College = and organist/director of music at First Presbyterian Church in Washington, NJ, where, incidentally a beautiful II/26 Schantz was installed during my tenure. With a Christmas Day service to play, and family located miles = away in the south, I always found myself, well, stuck at my church on = Christmas, not necessarily alone, but without family. So, thinking that there might = be others who for whatever reason might find themselves without family or friends on Christmas, I decided to provide an opportunity for a bit of Christmas cheer via this wonderful music that so often goes unheard = because of the relatively short season. As it turns out, there have been some = pretty amazing audiences in both size and spirit over the years. Of course, maybe they're just coming to either get away from football, or enjoy the cider, nog, and cookies afterward!   So, here we are 20 years later, and I've decided to play music that in the past has somehow spoken to folks in one way or another, or so they've = said. Here goes:   Vom Himmel hoch / Bach (from Christmas Oratorio) Grand Jeu et Duo (Echo Noel) / Daquin Noel Suisse / Daquin Les Bergers from La Nativite / Messiaen Adeste fideles / Karg-Elert O laufet, ihr Hirten / Drischner Noel Polonaise / Guilmant La Nativite / Langlais Christmas / Dethier Grand Fantasia on Joy to the World / Cheban   I KNOW you're all hard at work practicing your fingers to the bone, but I = do want to wish you a wonderful Christmas and blessed New Year!   Stephen Williams      
(back) Subject: Re: 128' stops From: "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 20 Dec 2004 18:56:51 +0100   Well, I just thought wars would be a lot more humane if fought with organs instead of guns. This is also a question of preventing unemployment -- if pipe organ builders lose the church organ market to digital imitations, they'd need a new place to sell their goods, and with skyrocketing military budgets all over...   Some historical trivia: The Nazis during WW2 managed to confuse the Soviet rocket launchers with organs, denoting them "Stalinorgeln". Must have been a result of Walcker's tonal ideals at the time. Also, the Vikings didn't get horned helmets before Wagner began writing operas.   Jarle http://jarle.moo.no   RonSeverin@aol.com wrote: > Alan: > > Hand on hip: Are you in otherwords calli' that young fellow Jarle. > Some kind a terrorist. Sweds, Norwegians, And Danes are very > nice people until they put on those horned helmits and scut > along on those little dragon ships of theirs. Jarle, you don't emit > those blood curdling war cries do you? You're just a garden > variety organ freak, right? At the tender age of fifteen, right? > > <GRIN> > > Ron the short horned bad boy >