PipeChat Digest #5023 - Tuesday, December 21, 2004
 
Re: Editing Text and headings
  by "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr>
RE: 32' sound in speakers
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
32' sound in speakers
  by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Fr Willis & Willis 3 follow up
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: More on 512-footers .. and LOWER!
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: 32' sound in speakers
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
Re: 32' sound in speakers
  by "Harry Grove" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk>
Re: Fr Willis & Willis 3 follow up
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
Re: 32' sound in speakers
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com>
RE: Fr Willis & Willis 3 follow up
  by "alantaylor1" <alantaylor1@members.v21.co.uk>
Austin Opus 952; First United Methodist Church; Saratoga Springs, New Yor
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
Re: Austin Opus 952; First United Methodist Church; Saratoga  Springs, Ne
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com>
Unusual stops Re: 128' stops
  by "James Edward Mackay" <ymcmlx@gmail.com>
Looking for recordings
  by "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Editing Text and headings From: "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr> Date: Tue, 21 Dec 2004 13:28:42 +0200   Ladies and Gentlemen of the list,   A propos the brief off topic discussion on presentation, it was not the content but the manner of its presentation which upset me. I looked back through quite a lot of past posts - I usually go to some trouble both to choose an appropritate heading, changing the topic when needed, and = cutting unneccesary garbage out. The most recent post to have included the Re: = Pipe chat .... was one I had sent on December 16th when, to quote John = Speller's excellent post on the subject "...the truth of the matter is that most of = us (including me) are at most times Brain Dead, and we occasionally make mistakes!" I agree wholeheartedly with the request for courtesy. I wonder if Mr Gluck =   feels that his post fulfilled this criterion. I am not trying to be = "Holier than Thou!" I am quite capable of exploding at times - though I try to count to ten. But sometimes like needs to be met with like.   On another matter, some people have pointed out that I didn't include all the details of the charity "BENJAMIN" which Organs and Organists Online is =   supporting this Christmas. Full details of the charity are to be found on =   the Home Page of Organs and Organists Online at http://www.organsandorganistsonline.com/ This is a charity which gives everything it receives to orphaned children. All administration costs are met by the trustees out of their own pockets.   With regards, John Foss    
(back) Subject: RE: 32' sound in speakers From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 21 Dec 2004 03:47:43 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   When audi people talk about "full range" speakers or microphones, they are talking about 20 - 20,000 Hz or so.   That's more than enough unless you wish to break windows etc.   As John Compton realised, the human ear is not really capable of discerning between CCCC, CCCC#, DDDD, DDDD# and EEEE, so other than rattling our false teeth in our heads, the fundamental serves no real musical purpose.   Compton also realised....such a clever man....that the harmonics of a 32ft were enough to provide the illusion of the fundamental. Hence the 32ft reed effect on many Compton organs, using a 16ft Trombone and the derived Mixture he called "Harmonics 32ft".   It works well enough.   I have some quite expensive Mics which will easily cover the range mentioned, and some monitor speakers which will do the same. I have never felt deprived of the bottom three notes or so!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK --- Will Light <will.light@btinternet.com> wrote:   > What say I is, (How's that for grammar?) "Your > little 8" speakers are > probably just reproducing the upper harmonics of the > recorded 32' stop, and > your ears are filling in the fundamental.     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Send a seasonal email greeting and help others. Do good. http://celebrity.mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: 32' sound in speakers From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Tue, 21 Dec 2004 06:03:00 -0600   Good Morning, PipeChatters, et al: Professional Sound people have seemingly agreed that the full range of a speaker system normally stops for subwoofers at about 24 to 26 Hz on the bottom end. You can search for subwoofers for quite a while, and the general results will be at or about that frequency, . . . and it is probably at least 3 dB to 6 dB down (10 to 12 dB?) from what the rest of the system is shoveling out. There are some speaker manufacturers who may be building custom work below that line, but they will probably charge you a leg or two. Also, remember that audio manufacturers can get away with a lot of frequency tolerance in small spaces, such as you living room, den, or study. This is the domain of the bookshelf speaker set, and it can work fairly well in most situations. BUT, when you need to reproduce 32-foot sound down to 16 Hz with full fundamental resonance (nor much to be heard, but felt) in a church-sized space, that is a whole different story. The speaker manufacturer can say "my speaker puts out sound at 12 Hz, if it wiggles and moves some air." Efficiency of converting the power in the amplifier to power in air movement is admittedly very poor, but .. . . it does wiggle and make some kind of air movement. F. Richard Burt ..    
(back) Subject: Fr Willis & Willis 3 follow up From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 21 Dec 2004 04:18:00 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   I just came across a couple of recorded sound samples which perfectly illustrate the points we were talking about concerning Willis organs. One note of real music being worth a thousand words, and all that.......   The URL for this remarkable and very convenient comparison is as follows:-   http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/listening_room.asp   The music, all of it excellent, is set out by composers, and divided into two sections....current releases and past releases.   In the current section, scroll dow to Whitlock, and click on John Scott playing the "Paen" from St.Paul's Cathedral, London. Straight away, you will hear the rather stringy chorus flues, the fantastic quality of the Tuba and, when everything builds up, the enormous power of the chorus reeds which swamp everything.   Then click on the next item, which is the Widor Toccata played on the Willis 3 of Westminster Cathedral.   Alan Taylor was absolutely right about the chorus-work.....it's all there, and sounds very, very good. Lewis influence of not, no Lewis ever had pedal reeds like the ones which crack in with this excellent recording.   I get the impression that these are two very good recordings of two rather large instruments.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Jazz up your holiday email with celebrity designs. Learn more. http://celebrity.mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: RE: More on 512-footers .. and LOWER! From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Wed, 22 Dec 2004 03:20:08 +1300   >Pondering all this, one can well imagine of Joshua was a bit "ahead of his time" and developed [or was given, by a cosmic friend] some type of "trumpet" that blasted such powerful, infrasonic tones that the walls of Jericho were brought down. I mean, really. How ELSE could it have happened?!   The way it was explained to me, and credibly, is that it was the regular rhythmical tramp-tramp of the soldiers' feet that brought down the Jericho walls and that the trumpets, whatever they were like, had no effect at = all. In exactly the same way soldiers on the march will break step when = crossing a bridge to prevent the bridge's destruction.   Ross    
(back) Subject: RE: 32' sound in speakers From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Tue, 21 Dec 2004 10:57:28 -0500   True, and there's also a difference between reproducing it in the living room, and filling a church with sound. Andy   On Tue, 21 Dec 2004 08:52:12 -0000, Will Light wrote > What say I is, (How's that for grammar?) "Your little 8" speakers are > probably just reproducing the upper harmonics of the recorded 32' > stop, and your ears are filling in the fundamental. This is the same > effect as when you put a quint against the fundamental to create the > illusion of a 32' pipe when using a Resultant Bass 32'. If you look > at the technical specifications of any microphone, no matter how > good, the response drops off to practically zero long before you get > down to 8 Hz. Although they are quite capable of recording the first > harmonic, i.e. 16Hz, the second harmonic at 24Hz etc..." That's what > I say! > > Will Light > Coventry UK > > I have a couple of Paradigm speakers with no more than 8" speakers > for the bass. How come I get nice purring 32' sound on a regular basis > from my organ recordings? The contrareeds ain't bad either. > wonderful sound, little speakers. I can't imagine those big boxes > people had in the sixties for organ recordings did much better. What > say ye? > > Ken   A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: Re: 32' sound in speakers From: "Harry Grove" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> Date: Tue, 21 Dec 2004 16:25:54 -0000   Very true; which is why, when I "fill the church" with 'artificial' sound = - whether 'Strings' for the Mozart Requiem, 'Harp' for the 'In Paradisum', = or Hammond for a Praise service, I get the trailor out and set out a = back-line of 2xJBL's [TX] (@ 2x18" + radiating cone tweeter, and Peavey fold-backs @ =   1xBWM 22" + 2 x 4" - the back-line power by Yamaha at 2000W per channel = and the fold-backs with Studiomaster at 600W per channel. Then I set it up to produce the same volume as the 'authentic' = instrument(s) would produce in that acoustic.   Result - a good quality sound, easily heard by everyone in the building, with no complaints that the system detracted from the music or that it dominated everything else involved.   As to whether it can produce this note or that; I'm not too concerned. However, in the Yr. 2000 Performance - which contained a son-et-luminere = of WWII, the bomb and the machine gun fire (yes, in church) had some of the audience diving for cover as it proved all too authentic for them.   Harry Grove [a.k.a. a musicman working with sound as well as music]   "Merry Cringle" to all who are too politically correct to want to be = wished a Happy Christmas at this time of year.   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, December 21, 2004 3:57 PM Subject: RE: 32' sound in speakers     > True, and there's also a difference between reproducing it in the living > room, and filling a church with sound. [snip]    
(back) Subject: Re: Fr Willis & Willis 3 follow up From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Tue, 21 Dec 2004 11:46:03 -0500   Thanks for that. I listened to both. Both sound great.   At the end of the day, I wish organists could learn to like their instruments more, or at least complain about them less. I think the best approach is to (quietly... we don't need the general public to think that most pipe organs are garbage) critique the organs we play, but not = complain about them. Except maybe when things are really bad... but we've got to = be careful about this. It seems, talking to some organists, that they feel there are maybe 3 good organs in a geographical location and the other 20 are "really bad". I don't think so. I've only played one organ that consider to be "really bad"... it was a 4 rank unit organ in a guys living =   room. And it was in terrible shape... causing me to wonder if even it = would not be so bad if well regulated and voiced.   Don't get me wrong... every organ I've played also has serious flaws, some =   more than others... but also strengths. Interestingly, sometimes some of the strengths are almost caused by the weaknesses (a diapason that's too = big and hooty turns out to have a use that I never would have thought to use a =   diapason for).   Its rare that I would suggest starting over. Probably the worst organ = I've ever played is the one I play every Sunday. I have had spells of wishing = I could burn it and start over, but now that I've had 5 years with it, I = think it could be turned into something pretty musical with the rescaling of a rank or two and the revoicing of a couple of others. And even as it sits, =   if you work with it, it works ok.   The time to be anal about it is when you are overseeing an organ being built.. then its time to be fussy. Once its built... stop complaining and =   play the thing.   For me, one of the most fun things about playing the organ is they're all = so different. I have my own idea of what an organ should be, and if I built organs they would have a lot in common with each other. But I'm thankful that different people have had different ideas because its so much fun to play a different organ and hear a totally different sound. Every organ = I've ever played (except the bad one i noted above) has a strength that has = given me new ideas of what an organ should be... even the worst ones. Interestingly, usually the organs that change my mind are small ones. I think it usually best, if one really can't live with an existing organ, to =   idenify its worst liablities and remedy them than to start over and risk trading one set of weaknesses for another, while spending lots of money = too.   Having said all that, if I could have $200,000 to spend on the little = 9-rank organ I play weekly, I'd start over. Ah... but I'd keep the wooly great diapason as a pedal stop. Save the pedal bourdon. The great melodia. = The swell spitz, but probably at 8' pitch only (its a pretty unsuccessful 97 note unit). The console shell. The blower, possibly the reserviors. I dunno... maybe its just the packrat disease. :)   Andy   > > http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/listening_room.asp > > The music, all of it excellent, is set out by > composers, and divided into two sections....current > releases and past releases. > > In the current section, scroll dow to Whitlock, and > click on John Scott playing the "Paen" from St.Paul's > Cathedral, London. Straight away, you will hear the > rather stringy chorus flues, the fantastic quality of > the Tuba and, when everything builds up, the enormous > power of the chorus reeds which swamp everything. > > Then click on the next item, which is the Widor > Toccata played on the Willis 3 of Westminster > Cathedral.     A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: Re: 32' sound in speakers From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> Date: Wed, 22 Dec 2004 02:23:02 +0800   Case in point, Bag End (bagend.com) S21E-C=20   "...is a high output INFRA subwoofer system designed to provide high fideli= ty extended low frequency audio reproduction from a relatively small enclos= ure. The S21E-C provides perfectly flat response down to 8 Hertz when used = in conjunction with the 8 Hertz Integrator. Designed for portable use, the = S21E-C includes handles, protective corners and a pole mount adapter on a c= arpeted enclosure."   I have no association with the company mentioned above.   Purpose-built speakers do exist ... this seems very specialized and would n= ever be used for full-range reproduction as in a home environment.   ----- Original Message ----- From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Subject: 32' sound in speakers Date: Tue, 21 Dec 2004 06:03:00 -0600   >=20 > Good Morning, PipeChatters, et al: >=20 > Professional Sound people have seemingly agreed that the > full range of a speaker system normally stops for subwoofers > at about 24 to 26 Hz on the bottom end. You can search > for subwoofers for quite a while, and the general results will > be at or about that frequency, . . . and it is probably at least > 3 dB to 6 dB down (10 to 12 dB?) from what the rest of > the system is shoveling out. >=20 > There are some speaker manufacturers who may be > building custom work below that line, but they will > probably charge you a leg or two. >=20 > Also, remember that audio manufacturers can get away > with a lot of frequency tolerance in small spaces, such as > you living room, den, or study. This is the domain of the > bookshelf speaker set, and it can work fairly well in most > situations. >=20 > BUT, when you need to reproduce 32-foot sound down > to 16 Hz with full fundamental resonance (nor much to > be heard, but felt) in a church-sized space, that is a > whole different story. >=20 > The speaker manufacturer can say "my speaker puts > out sound at 12 Hz, if it wiggles and moves some air." > Efficiency of converting the power in the amplifier to > power in air movement is admittedly very poor, but > . . . it does wiggle and make some kind of air movement. >=20 > F. Richard Burt   -- Jan Nijhuis nijhuis@email.com   --=20 ___________________________________________________________ Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm    
(back) Subject: RE: Fr Willis & Willis 3 follow up From: "alantaylor1" <alantaylor1@members.v21.co.uk> Date: Tue, 21 Dec 2004 19:38:21 -0000     Firstly, let me thank Colin for the link to Hyperion listening room.   It isn't the chorus that is heard in the John Scott recording. I wonder if he was using all of the 8ft flues. I will ask him next time I email him. I won't be buying the Whitlock CD. As 2 minutes of Whitlock is quite enough for me.   Alan London   I just came across a couple of recorded sound samples which perfectly illustrate the points we were talking about concerning Willis organs. One note of real music being worth a thousand words, and all that.......   The URL for this remarkable and very convenient comparison is as follows:-   http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/listening_room.asp   The music, all of it excellent, is set out by composers, and divided into two sections....current releases and past releases.   In the current section, scroll dow to Whitlock, and click on John Scott playing the "Paen" from St.Paul's Cathedral, London. Straight away, you will hear the rather stringy chorus flues, the fantastic quality of the Tuba and, when everything builds up, the enormous power of the chorus reeds which swamp everything.   Then click on the next item, which is the Widor Toccata played on the Willis 3 of Westminster Cathedral.   Alan Taylor was absolutely right about the chorus-work.....it's all there, and sounds very, very good. Lewis influence of not, no Lewis ever had pedal reeds like the ones which crack in with this excellent recording.   I get the impression that these are two very good recordings of two rather large instruments.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.296 / Virus Database: 265.6.2 - Release Date: 20/12/2004    
(back) Subject: Austin Opus 952; First United Methodist Church; Saratoga Springs, New York From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Tue, 21 Dec 2004 15:33:43 -0600   Some of you may be familiar with the current project to convert the forme= r First Methodist Church building of Saratoga Springs, NY to a non-religi= ous affiliated performance venue called Universal Preservation Hall. =20   As part of the project, they have removed the 1920s Austin organ of 59 ra= nks--opus 952. According to an acquaintance who has played the instrumen= t, this organ featured a 5 or 6 rank antiphonal echo division housed in o= ne of the rear towers.   You can see pictures of the building and organ(s) at the link below:   http://www.universalpreservationhall.org/   There are at least three pictures of the organ(s):   1. 1870s view of the first installation with the center fa=E7ade pipes re= moved (that might be them leaning against the balcony wall on the left). 2. View of the 1920's Austin with larger fa=E7ade. 3. Mid-twentieth century view of the organ and sanctuary. Woodwork paint= ed sky-blue, and the organ fa=E7ade either gone or covered up with cloth = screens.   One of the justifications for removing the organ was the fact that the ne= wer 1920's organ consumed the entire smallish apse, and obstructed two go= thic windows that were exposed with the smaller, earlier organ that was i= nstalled. =20 Another reason was cost of restoration. Indeed, the corporation was reli= eved to have someone come and remove it for free, and not have to pay a l= arge fee for removal. "Someone" in the "west" spent 32 days removing the= instrument, and has "carefully" stored it for future incorporation (into= another instrument) or installation.   While its at least nice that the instrument was "saved", its too bad that= it couldn't have really been "saved" in the building. Of course, anothe= r alternative might be to install a smaller, late 19th century building t= hat wouldn't obscure the architecture so much. It would seem, to us, at = least, that a fine orchestral organ would have been the "icing on the cak= e" in a large, beautiful performance venue...   Anyone on the list know more details about the organ (from past experienc= e playing it, maybe) or the project?   Regards, and Merry Christmas,   Daniel Hancock Springfield, Missouri =A0 "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful committed citizens can chan= ge the world - indeed, it is the only thing that ever has."=A0 --Margaret= Mead  
(back) Subject: Re: Austin Opus 952; First United Methodist Church; Saratoga Springs, New York From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com> Date: Tue, 21 Dec 2004 17:23:34 -0500   Daniel,   The long and the short of it is, in this case, they don't want an organ,=20 they don't ever want an organ. It ruins their sight lines, and they don't= =20 plan on using an organ in there.   It is hard for us organ buffs to think this, but the organ is not main=20 stream at the moment, and may never be again. Asking some outfit to keep=20 and maintain a pipe organ, if they don't in the least have interest in it,= =20 is like asking people to keep their relics (old cars, old barns, old=20 houses, etc) because someone else is interested in looking at them. If=20 organists really want to keep all those old pipe organs going, they should= =20 be willing to set up funds to maintain them in perpetuity. Then maybe we=20 will see some of these organs that are presently being given away, kept=20 where they are, and used periodically.   Arie V.         At 03:33 PM 2004-12-21 -0600, you wrote: >Some of you may be familiar with the current project to convert the former= =20 >First Methodist Church building of Saratoga Springs, NY to a non-religious= =20 >affiliated performance venue called Universal Preservation Hall. > >As part of the project, they have removed the 1920s Austin organ of 59=20 >ranks--opus 952. According to an acquaintance who has played the=20 >instrument, this organ featured a 5 or 6 rank antiphonal echo division=20 >housed in one of the rear towers. > >You can see pictures of the building and organ(s) at the link below: > >http://www.universalpreservationhall.org/ > >There are at least three pictures of the organ(s): > >1. 1870s view of the first installation with the center fa=E7ade pipes=20 >removed (that might be them leaning against the balcony wall on the left). >2. View of the 1920's Austin with larger fa=E7ade. >3. Mid-twentieth century view of the organ and sanctuary. Woodwork=20 >painted sky-blue, and the organ fa=E7ade either gone or covered up with=20 >cloth screens. > >One of the justifications for removing the organ was the fact that the=20 >newer 1920's organ consumed the entire smallish apse, and obstructed two=20 >gothic windows that were exposed with the smaller, earlier organ that was= =20 >installed. > >Another reason was cost of restoration. Indeed, the corporation was=20 >relieved to have someone come and remove it for free, and not have to pay= =20 >a large fee for removal. "Someone" in the "west" spent 32 days removing=20 >the instrument, and has "carefully" stored it for future incorporation=20 >(into another instrument) or installation. > >While its at least nice that the instrument was "saved", its too bad that= =20 >it couldn't have really been "saved" in the building. Of course, another= =20 >alternative might be to install a smaller, late 19th century building that= =20 >wouldn't obscure the architecture so much. It would seem, to us, at=20 >least, that a fine orchestral organ would have been the "icing on the=20 >cake" in a large, beautiful performance venue... > >Daniel Hancock      
(back) Subject: Unusual stops Re: 128' stops From: "James Edward Mackay" <ymcmlx@gmail.com> Date: Tue, 21 Dec 2004 17:42:52 -0600   This post reminds me of a humourous set of pages I was given years ago. I have no idea who gave them to me, but they have provided many laughs over the year. I'd be happy to send a copy to anyone who wants one. Just send me a note <organist@att.net> or <ymcmlx@gmail.com>.   James   Concerning the MAYTAG PIPE ORGAN:   =E2=80=94 The Cathedral of Our Lady of Venus de Milo on the Half Shell presents AN ORGAN RECITAL played with impeccable speed and agility on their brand, spanking new, fabulously expensive MAYTAG PIPE ORGAN   =E2=80=94 Outline: The Service of Holy Communion on the Feast Day of Saint Roscoe, including the prelude "Caprice for the Tuba Mirabilis," service music by Rod McKuen, and the hymn, "The Dove Descending Bumps His Head" (Tune: Concussion).   =E2=80=94 One of the recital programmes: by Gale St=C3=B6rm, Toccato XIX, = in F-sharp minor, "The Tornado"; by J. J. O. S. N. Bach, Chorale Preludes on "By the Waters of Lake Eola," "By the Shores of Gitchenigoomie" (double pedal), "By the Shining Big-see Waters" (canon at 38th), and "Herr Jesu, meine Nose doth Run".   =E2=80=94 These stops in the specs: Great (Manual II), 32' Contra-Ceptive,= 8' Guitar, 1' Super-Duper Octav, 8' Cornucopia =E2=80=A2 Swell (Manual III), 1= 6' Trashkann, 8' Oboe Celeste, 1' Shrille =E2=80=A2 Choir (Manual I), 16' Tuba Mirabilis, 16' Tuba Mirabilis Celeste; Echo (Manual IV), 16' Glass Harmonica Celeste =E2=80=A2 Solo (Manual V), 64' Gamba Celeste en chamade, = 2' Mildred Pierce, 16' Hand Grenade =E2=80=A2 Pedal (two stops only), 64' Vox humana, 32' Subbass celeste, Tremolo =E2=80=A2 Generals, 198 general piston= s, Organ On/Off, Prinzipals-become-chimes =E2=80=A2 Manuals VI and VII control the somewhat less pretentions Kenmore-Norge Pipe Organ at the Second-to-the-Last Presbyterian Church.   Concerning the A.G.O. JACKSON CHAPTER ALL-MEMBER RECITAL:   =E2=80=94 Pipework: Midwestern-Organ Supply Co., Bleary, Pa. =E2=80=A2 Con= sole: new folding type, Dorian-Skinny Co.   =E2=80=94 Programme: by Bach, "Tomato, Avacado and Fig in C"; by Handle, T= he Do-do and the Hoot Owl; by Melongrow, "Tumult in the Practice Room" from (from Passionate Symphony).   =E2=80=94 The Midmer-Slosh Organ =E2=80=A2 Swell (Manual III), 9' Vile Cele= ste, Trembly Aunt =E2=80=A2 Great (Manual II), 8' Hell Trumpet =E2=80=A2 Terrifi= c (Manual I), 2 2/3' Nasty, 8' Corno de Pisces =E2=80=A2 Piddle, 64' Sack Butt, III Cough Mixture.   Concerning the HISTERICAL ORGAN RECITAL SERIOUS:   =E2=80=94 Selections: "Extended Chorale on 'Bringing in the Sheaves'; "The Swan"; "Toccata and Fudge from 'Midsummer Day's Nightmare'.   =E2=80=94 The Organ =E2=80=A2 Positif (Manual I), 8' Cor d'Apple, Nimbleste= rn =E2=80=A2 Grate (Manual II), 16' Contra-Many Blessings, 8' Bourbon, Mixture (3 parts gin, 2 of rum) =E2=80=A2 Swill (Manual III), 8' Gagging Principal, 8' Celes= te Holme =E2=80=A2 Peddle, 32' Bumble Bee, 2' Wasp =E2=80=A2 Couplers, Music R= ack to Grate, Medicine Chest to Swill, Page Turner to Organ Bench.       On Sat, 18 Dec 2004 08:26:57 +0100, Jarle Fagerheim <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk> wrote: > Good morning, >=20 > I've been wondering for a while what effect a 128' or even 256' open > wood pipe would have   --=20 JAMES EDWARD MACKAY Fargo, North Dakota USA ymcmlx@gmail.com organist@att.net  
(back) Subject: Looking for recordings From: "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net> Date: Tue, 21 Dec 2004 19:21:38 -0500   Greetings to all!   Anyone know of any commercially available CD's that include David N. Johnson's "Trumpet Tune in D Major" and his "Processional in E Flat Major?"   Thanks!   Steve Best in Utica, NY