PipeChat Digest #5025 - Wednesday, December 22, 2004
 
Re: 32" sound in speakers
  by "James Grebe" <pianoman@accessus.net>
Treble tone clusters
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: 32' C frequency
  by "Roy Kersey" <rkersey@tds.net>
Re: 32' sound in speakers
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Re: 32' sound in speakers in greeting
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
RE: Austin Opus 952; First United Methodist Church; Saratoga Springs, New
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
King's College Lessons & Carols order
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
RE: 32" sound in speakers
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Every Organist's Worst Nightmare
  by "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net>
RE: Austin Opus 952; First United Methodist Church; Saratoga Springs, New
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: Every Organist's Worst Nightmare
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
Re: 32" sound in speakers
  by "James Grebe" <pianoman@accessus.net>
Re: 32" sound in speakers
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
RE: 32" sound in speakers
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Christmas Eve, First United Lutheran, Hammond, IN
  by "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com>
Celeste Tuning (the real thing, not the stop tab!)
  by "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com>
Re: Celeste Tuning (the real thing, not the stop tab!)
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: Celeste Tuning (the real thing, not the stop tab!)
  by "Mattcinnj" <mattcinnj@yahoo.com>
RE: Celeste Tuning (the real thing, not the stop tab!)
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: 32" sound in speakers
  by "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net>
Looking for a Kimball Viole D'Orchestra
  by "Michael Brandt" <michaelpl70@yahoo.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: 32" sound in speakers From: "James Grebe" <pianoman@accessus.net> Date: Wed, 22 Dec 2004 06:01:08 -0600   The same phenonemun happens in the low register of pianos. In the low = bass the strings that are there cannot produce the fundamental of the low tones =   but do produce the upper partials of the note that the string can produce. =   When our ears hears these upper partials that belong to a lower frequency our ears and mind make up the difference. Even in a 9' grand the fundamental is not there on A-0. Of course the longer the string and greater the soundboard the lower the piano can produce more of a semblance =   of the fundamental. James Grebe Piano-Forte Tuning & Repair Creator of Handsome Hardwood Caster Cups (314) 608-4137 WWW.JamesGrebe.com 1526 Raspberry Lane Arnold, MO 63010 BECOME WHAT YOU BELIEVE! pianoman@accessus.net ----- Original Message ----- From: "Roy Kersey" <rkersey@tds.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, December 21, 2004 11:12 PM Subject: Re: 32" sound in speakers     > Hi Will and All, > With all due respect, Will, I think your explanation of what's > happening when an 8 inch speaker "seems" to reproduce 32 foot tone is = not > quite right. When a resultant is produced by a 16 foot pipe and a quint =   > at 10 2/3, a real difference tone is produced. If the 16 foot C is = about > 60 Hz and the quint is 90 Hz, the difference tone produced is 90 minus = 60, > or 30 Hz, which is the 32 foot C frequency. It's really produced. When =   > the small speaker produces harmonics but not the fundamental, the ear, = via > auditory perception, "thinks" it hears the fundamental that isn't really =   > there. I think the two phenomena are different. > Best Regards, > Roy Kersey > Organ Enthusiast and Amateur Trumpeter > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: Treble tone clusters From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 22 Dec 2004 05:05:20 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   What about the other end of the musical scale?   Play a C major triad at the top of the keyboard with Mixtures etc. drawn, and what notes are playing?   C- E -G G -B -D: B -D# -F# : D -F#- A on a quint mixture E -G# -B (Tierce) A#-D -F (Septieme)   On a Schnitger organ with a Carillon Mixture, we can even add the 4th to all this, giving us:-   F -A -C: A -C# -E : C -E -G   So out of all the possible notes of the chromatic scale, we will hear, with everything drawn, and at various pitches and strengths, all of them:-   C -C# -D -D# -E -F- F# -G -G# -A - A# -B   A bit of tone cluster, eh?   Why can it sound so good?   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- James Grebe <pianoman@accessus.net> wrote:   > The same phenonemun happens in the low register of > pianos. In the low bass > the strings that are there cannot produce the > fundamental of the low tones > but do produce the upper partials of the note that > the string can produce.     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Send a seasonal email greeting and help others. Do good. http://celebrity.mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: 32' C frequency From: "Roy Kersey" <rkersey@tds.net> Date: Wed, 22 Dec 2004 9:00:09 -0500   Hi Bill and (other) Hardworking Organists, Yes, I mis-spoke . . . 32 foot C is 16Hz. Middle C is about 256 Hz, = lowest C on piano is about 32 Hz, the low A is about 24 Hz and the top C = is about 4096 Hz. For A=3D440 Hz, that is. I will try to remember . . . Regards, Roy Kersey Organ Enthusiast and Amateur Trumpeter    
(back) Subject: Re: 32' sound in speakers From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Wed, 22 Dec 2004 08:53:24 -0800   I built some custom systems to do that 32'. It uses 2 15" woofers in tandem in an Isobaric configuration ( one pushes, one pulls). and although the living room is 30 ft long I have to walk through the house to catch the "nodes" of those lows in different places.   John V    
(back) Subject: Re: 32' sound in speakers in greeting From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Wed, 22 Dec 2004 09:07:55 -0800   > > >"Merry Cringle" to all who are too politically correct to want to be >wished a Happy Christmas at this time of year.     Or Happy-new-thanks-kwan-chana-mas... to all   John V        
(back) Subject: RE: Austin Opus 952; First United Methodist Church; Saratoga Springs, New York From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Wed, 22 Dec 2004 09:44:27 -0600   Arie V. wrote:   >The long and the short of it is, in this case, they don't want an organ,=20 >they don't ever want an organ.   That seems to be the case here, although perhaps they're failing to realize what an asset that could be to their glorified coffeehouse in a church!   >It ruins their sight lines, and they don't=20 >plan on using an organ in there.   I fail to see how. The apse is too small to be used as a working backstage, and I'm also amazed to see such a large space limited to 700 seats. It surely seated more than that when new!   >It is hard for us organ buffs to think this, but the organ is not main=20 >stream at the moment, and may never be again. =20   You're more correct here than I care to admit. But I have to ask myself: "whose fault is this?" =20   >Asking some outfit to keep=20 >and maintain a pipe organ, if they don't in the least have interest in it,=20 >is like asking people to keep their relics (old cars, old barns, old=20 >houses, etc) because someone else is interested in looking at them. If   >organists really want to keep all those old pipe organs going, they should=20 >be willing to set up funds to maintain them in perpetuity. Then maybe we=20 >will see some of these organs that are presently being given away, kept   >where they are, and used periodically.   Perhaps you're right, here, too. It isn't proper for "us" organists to ask any "outfit" to keep a pipe organ that isn't wanted--especially when we, as a profession at large, haven't always done what we ought to do to see that they "can't but help" love the instrument. =20   Organists are NOT responsible for setting up funds to maintain them in perpetuity. That will result in nothing but a "Club" of enthusiasts and players who spend their money on their instruments for their own interests. =20   The result? The organ becomes even more specialized, and less heard by the general public.=20   The real solution has to work more like this: =20   Organists have got to prove to people that the instrument is worthwhile--we just can't tell them that verbally. Actions speak louder than words. When we are doing this to the best of our abilities, then we won't have to ask for venerable old instruments to be kept. "Outfits" will want to keep them, because they will recognize their value.   I don't yet take responsibility for the organ "not being in the mainstream," because I'm young, and was born into that situation. But that doesn't mean that I have to succumb to the status quo, and accept with resignation the organ's demise. I'm intent on drawing people to the instrument, and to that end, I'm dedicated. =20   What does it take? The perfect instrument? No. Even if such an instrument existed, few people would ever hear it. It takes everyday, average organists being willing to work with what they have and make the absolute best music they can with it. It takes determination, creativity, and discipline--and above all, a positive attitude about the entire situation.   The organ can indeed re-enter the mainstream, and it can happen in my lifetime.   Daniel Hancock Springfield, Missouri=20   P.S. Equating an old organ with an old car or barn is a poor comparison--although, as an architect, I'll have to admit, I see much value in maintaining what's left of the vernacular landscape!  
(back) Subject: King's College Lessons & Carols order From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Wed, 22 Dec 2004 10:59:52 -0500   The complete text of the King's College Nine Lessons and Carols service, complete with composers and publishers, can be found at   http://www.kings.cam.ac.uk/chapel/ninelessons/2004/index.html   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA    
(back) Subject: RE: 32" sound in speakers From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 23 Dec 2004 06:38:56 +1300     >When our ears hears these upper partials that belong to a lower frequency =   our ears and mind make up the difference. Even in a 9' grand the fundamental is not there on A-0. Of course the longer the string and greater the soundboard the lower the piano can produce more of a semblance =   of the fundamental.   I've been told that the shorter and fatter the string, the more prominent the harmonics, and that as the Tierce is much more prominent in a short = fat bass string (much overwound to get some bass) the very low notes tend to = be tuned to the Tierce rather than the fundamental to make them sound in = tune. So, in fact, in a small piano the low octaves are not actually in tune, = but merely sound as if they are. This, I believe, is why pianos often don't sound right with organs.   Is all of this correct, or is it an "urban myth"?   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: Every Organist's Worst Nightmare From: "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net> Date: Wed, 22 Dec 2004 12:39:47 -0500   Dear Josh, Geez. I thought that only happened to us old guys of 63. Well the = fact that you fixed it is all that counts.=20 Paul ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Joshwwhite@aol.com=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Tuesday, December 21, 2004 11:38 PM Subject: Re: Every Organist's Worst Nightmare     In a message dated 12/21/2004 8:00:07 PM Central Standard Time, = BlueeyedBear@aol.com writes: OMG -- that leaves me speechless!!!   Scott, it sounds as if you weren't the only one who was left = speechless! The audience obviously had to take time to think about it = before they went on to applaud....   Oh well, I played in a concert at my church this past Sunday and I was = feeling bad about a simple little mistake I made in one of my solos. = For some reason after I started playing I panicked because it SOUNDED = like I had the wrong combination. So I look over and start reading the = names of the stops that were on-only to realize that in the process my = left hand had started a different measure than my right hand and pedal. = It took two measures to get back in sync, but I finally relaxed when I = realized I had hit the right piston and the rest of the piece went well. = But I still felt bad about it-until now!   Josh White     --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.786 / Virus Database: 532 - Release Date: 10/29/2004
(back) Subject: RE: Austin Opus 952; First United Methodist Church; Saratoga Springs, New York From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 23 Dec 2004 06:46:33 +1300   >Organists have got to prove to people that the instrument is worthwhile--we just can't tell them that verbally. Actions speak louder than words. When we are doing this to the best of our abilities, then we won't have to ask for venerable old instruments to be kept. "Outfits" will want to keep them, because they will recognize their value. [snip] >It takes determination, creativity, and discipline--and above all, a positive attitude about the entire situation.   Here in New Zealand, Martin and Jenny Setchell are superb publicists for = the newish Rieger tracker in the Christchurch Town Hall. These folk are fine musicians, expert computer specialists, all you could ask for. Pipechat people should Google "Christchurch Town Hall" and go right through their = web site. They even make jigsaws with a picture of the organ on them.   Google, now.   Ross      
(back) Subject: RE: Every Organist's Worst Nightmare From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Wed, 22 Dec 2004 17:46:04 -0000   Well that's never happened to me, and I'm 62 - so does it mean I can = look forward to calamities like that next year?   =20   Will Light Coventry UK   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of = Paul Valtos Sent: 22 December 2004 17:40 To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Every Organist's Worst Nightmare   =20   Dear Josh,   Geez. I thought that only happened to us old guys of 63. Well the = fact that you fixed it is all that counts.=20   Paul   ----- Original Message -----=20   From: Joshwwhite@aol.com=20   To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20   Sent: Tuesday, December 21, 2004 11:38 PM   Subject: Re: Every Organist's Worst Nightmare   =20   In a message dated 12/21/2004 8:00:07 PM Central Standard Time, BlueeyedBear@aol.com writes:   OMG -- that leaves me speechless!!!   Scott, it sounds as if you weren't the only one who was left speechless! The audience obviously had to take time to think about it before they = went on to applaud....   =20   Oh well, I played in a concert at my church this past Sunday and I was feeling bad about a simple little mistake I made in one of my solos. = For some reason after I started playing I panicked because it SOUNDED like I = had the wrong combination. So I look over and start reading the names of = the stops that were on-only to realize that in the process my left hand had started a different measure than my right hand and pedal. It took two measures to get back in sync, but I finally relaxed when I realized I = had hit the right piston and the rest of the piece went well. But I still = felt bad about it-until now!   =20   Josh White   =20     --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.786 / Virus Database: 532 - Release Date: 10/29/2004    
(back) Subject: Re: 32" sound in speakers From: "James Grebe" <pianoman@accessus.net> Date: Wed, 22 Dec 2004 11:52:58 -0600   Hi, Because of what we call inharmonicity in piano strings, the upper partials =   of a piano tone are gradually ascending in sharpness. When we listen to 2 =   tones, an octave apart, in order for that octave to be beatless the 2nd partial of the lower note is in tune with the 1st partial of the upper = note. In doing this , that would mean that the fundamentals are not in tune. If =   you tuned fundamental to fundamental then the octave would have a slight beat as the upper tone would aurally be a little flat. As you go up to successive partials the sharpness increases. That is why you hear the term, " stretching the octaves." What you = are really doing is matching the 1st to the 2nd partial as you go up the = scale. To giver a little more brightness many tuners tune to the 4th partial of = the lower note to the 1st partial of the higher note. Long pianos , like Steinway concert grands. receive this kind of tuning for the stage. James Grebe Piano-Forte Tuning & Repair Creator of Handsome Hardwood Caster Cups (314) 608-4137 WWW.JamesGrebe.com 1526 Raspberry Lane Arnold, MO 63010 BECOME WHAT YOU BELIEVE! pianoman@accessus.net ----- Original Message ----- From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, December 22, 2004 11:38 AM Subject: RE: 32" sound in speakers     > >>When our ears hears these upper partials that belong to a lower = frequency > our ears and mind make up the difference. Even in a 9' grand the > fundamental is not there on A-0. Of course the longer the string and > greater the soundboard the lower the piano can produce more of a = semblance > of the fundamental. > > I've been told that the shorter and fatter the string, the more = prominent > the harmonics, and that as the Tierce is much more prominent in a short > fat > bass string (much overwound to get some bass) the very low notes tend to =   > be > tuned to the Tierce rather than the fundamental to make them sound in > tune. > So, in fact, in a small piano the low octaves are not actually in tune, > but > merely sound as if they are. This, I believe, is why pianos often don't > sound right with organs. > > Is all of this correct, or is it an "urban myth"? > > Ross > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: Re: 32" sound in speakers From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Wed, 22 Dec 2004 13:18:40 EST   Ross: Even though pianos are supposedly tuned to equal temperament some stretch tuning is done by top tuners in the bass end of the keyboard. Most piano players want a warm sound and these guys use formula tricks that they pass on to one another. The longer the string harp and strings the better the sound. Short harps and strings use girded heavier bass strings to compensate for loss in length. This also changes the color, and stunts the bass somewhat. Ron  
(back) Subject: RE: 32" sound in speakers From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 23 Dec 2004 08:02:44 +1300   > The longer the string harp and strings the better the sound. Short harps and strings use girded heavier bass strings to compensate for loss in length. This also changes the color, and stunts the bass somewhat. =A0 Oh yes! My piano is a Karn upright (from Woodstock, Ontario, I believe) = from the early 1930s, and is only 3ft 7ins. high above the castors. It's = bottom octave is certainly not what I'd wish, but it has a lovely bright treble = and a superb touch that make it a delight to play. Against that, though with even better touch, was the flawless 1906 Bechstein grand in my last = parish church - it was 7ft 8ins. long and had a gloriously rich bass that sang = for a long time before dying away. I love my piano, and it's fine for my = simple playing needs - hymns, Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Haydn, sundry = harpsichord music, a bit of the easier Chopin, etc., but the big Bechstein deserved = a great talent and BIG music, though was incredible even in hymns. It was = used constantly by music teachers for pupil recitals as well as by the parish = for its own music and concerts.   Ross        
(back) Subject: Christmas Eve, First United Lutheran, Hammond, IN From: "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com> Date: Wed, 22 Dec 2004 15:18:53 -0600   Christmas Eve Candlelight/Holy Communion Service the Rev. Dr. Basasam J. Abdallah, Pastor and Presiding Minister Beau Surratt, Director of Music and Organist     Prelude (9:30 PM)   Settings of 'In Dulci Jubilo' Johann Michael Bach, Marcel Dupre, James = Engel Go Tell It On The Mountain- Johannes Mathias Michel Greensleeves- Purvis Noel Grand Jeu et Duo- Daquin Bring A Torch, Jeanette, Isabella- arr. Jerry Westenkuehler   Handbells- O Come All Ye Faithful, O Come, O Come, Emmanuel and Joy to the World- arr. Peggy A. Thompson   Christmas Proclamation- Chanted by Yours Truly   Processional Hymn- "O Come, All Ye Faithful" (settings by Sir David = Willcocks)   Gloria- LBW Setting 1   Psalm 96- setting by Thomas Pavlechko from the St. James Psalter   Gospel Procession- "Hark the Herald Angels Sing" (setting by Sir David)   Carol- "Go Tell It On The Mountain" (settings by John Ferguson)   Hymn of the Day- "From Heaven Above" VOM HIMMEL HOCH (settings by John Ferguson, Ernst Pepping)   Anthem- "Before the Marvel Of This Night" Carl Schalk Sanctuary Choir   Offertory- "O Holy Night" arr. Craig Courtney Sanctuary Choir   Offertory Canticle- LBW Setting 1 "Let the Vineyards"   Distribution Hymns- "What Child Is This" "O Little Town of Bethlehem" "Infant Holy, Infant Lowly"   Post-Communion Canticle - LBW Setting 1 "Thank the Lord"   Lighting of the Candles- Carol, Silent Night   Sending Hymn- "Joy to the World" (settings by Charles Ore, Hal Hopson)   Postlude- "In Dulci Jubilo" J.S. Bach   Sanctus- LBW Setting 1     Blessings, Beau Surratt Director of Music and Organist First United Lutheran Church, ELCA 6705 Hohman Ave. Hammond, IN 46324      
(back) Subject: Celeste Tuning (the real thing, not the stop tab!) From: "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com> Date: Wed, 22 Dec 2004 13:50:08 -0800   A properly tuned Voix celeste should increase in "nervousness" as you ascend the scale. However, this only works really well with "stringy strings" and not Gemshorns, Flute celestes, etc.   I don't know the exact counts-per-second of each given pitch but in middle C range, the beating should actually be rather mild, in fact so you don't hear "beats" at all but just a gentle undulation.   I have always wanted to hear a 3-rank celeste where there is a flat, natural and sharp rank. If tuned correctly, I bet it sounds fabulous.   ~ C    
(back) Subject: Re: Celeste Tuning (the real thing, not the stop tab!) From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Wed, 22 Dec 2004 15:55:49 -0600     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, December 22, 2004 3:50 PM Subject: Celeste Tuning (the real thing, not the stop tab!)     > A properly tuned Voix celeste should increase in > "nervousness" as you ascend the scale. However, this only > works really well with "stringy strings" and not Gemshorns, > Flute celestes, etc.   In other words, the rate of celesting should vary according to the scale = of the pipework. Broader strings should celeste more slowly than strongly orchestral strings.   John Speller      
(back) Subject: Re: Celeste Tuning (the real thing, not the stop tab!) From: "Mattcinnj" <mattcinnj@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 22 Dec 2004 14:51:46 -0800 (PST)   Hi Everyone, I'm sure most of us has indeed heard this ........ via the STRING Division = on the Wanamaker organ. There are about 60 some odd sets (3 ranks each) = like this. Allen organs had 1 set on the ADC8350's Swell Division. The = balance between the sharp and flat celeste ranks was crucial = ............... otherwise a very "out of phase" sound resulted. Matt   Charlie Lester <crl@137.com> wrote: I have always wanted to hear a 3-rank celeste where there is a flat, natural and sharp rank. If tuned correctly, I bet it sounds fabulous.   ~ C     ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: List-Digest: List-Unsubscribe:     --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - Find what you need with new enhanced search. Learn more.
(back) Subject: RE: Celeste Tuning (the real thing, not the stop tab!) From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 23 Dec 2004 12:08:41 +1300     > properly tuned Voix celeste should increase in "nervousness" as you ascend the scale.   Why? I think we've had this debate before.   The great masters like TCLewis always tuned their Celestes to create = exactly the same number of beats to every note of the scale.   It's certainly easier, and quicker, to tune a Celeste the other way - = merely get the bottom octave right and then tune the Celeste in octaves on = itself. The Celeste will sound far far better if the Celeste is always tuned to = the parent rank. I only know one organ tuner who does not do it this way, and = I had to threaten to sack him from the church's tuning unless he'd do as I directed. When I spoke to the man who had trained him, he assured me that = he had been trained correctly but had clearly not bothered with what he was taught.   That is the British, and therefore NZ, tradition anyway.   Ross    
(back) Subject: RE: 32" sound in speakers From: "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net> Date: Wed, 22 Dec 2004 18:15:00 -0500   At 8:02 AM +1300 12/23/04, TheShieling wrote: > > The longer >the string harp and strings the better the sound. Short harps and >strings use girded heavier bass strings to compensate for loss >in length. This also changes the color, and stunts the bass somewhat. > >Oh yes! My piano is a Karn upright (from Woodstock, Ontario, I believe) = from >the early 1930s, and is only 3ft 7ins. high above the castors. It's = bottom >octave is certainly not what I'd wish, but it has a lovely bright treble = and >a superb touch that make it a delight to play. Against that, though with >even better touch, was the flawless 1906 Bechstein grand in my last = parish >church - it was 7ft 8ins. long and had a gloriously rich bass that sang = for >a long time before dying away. I love my piano, and it's fine for my = simple >playing needs - hymns, Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Haydn, sundry harpsichord >music, a bit of the easier Chopin, etc., but the big Bechstein deserved a >great talent and BIG music, though was incredible even in hymns. It was = used >constantly by music teachers for pupil recitals as well as by the parish = for >its own music and concerts. > >Ross > > > > >****************************************************************** >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> >List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> >List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>    
(back) Subject: Looking for a Kimball Viole D'Orchestra From: "Michael Brandt" <michaelpl70@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 22 Dec 2004 15:15:27 -0800 (PST)   Dear List Members,   I am looking for an 8' Kimball Viole D'Orchestra to replace the one missing from my Kimball "Soloist" pipe organ. I actually have the low 9 zinc pipes from CC to GG*; the missing pipes are the tin ones from AA to C73. The scale is CC=3D68, and the wind pressure is 7.5". I would appreciate any and all leads that list members might be able to provide. I know these are rare stops, but I am sure there is one out there just waiting to be put back into a Kimball organ. Thank you, Michael LuBrant (e-mail MichaelPL70@yahoo.com)