PipeChat Digest #5031 - Saturday, December 25, 2004
 
32' (Foot) was Re: 32" (inch) sound in speakers
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com>
Christmas Bonus from Organs and Organists Online
  by "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr>
Joy to the World
  by "Harry Grove" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk>
Last Verses for Organ
  by "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com>
Re: Glasgow, Scotland
  by "Arno Schuh" <arno.schuh@in-trier.de>
Mexico (x-post)
  by "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net>
Re: fancy footwork video clip wanted
  by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: fancy footwork video clip wanted
  by "C. Joseph Nichols" <cjn@nicholsandsimpson.com>
Re: Glasgow, Scotland
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Merry Christmas - Off Topic
  by "Keith Zimmerman" <kwzimmerman@alltel.net>
Re: Chicago Holy Cross Cathedral and two ? organs
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Chicago Holy Cross Cathedral and two ? organs
  by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: OK, tell me . . .
  by "mack02445" <mack02445@comcast.net>
Re: 32 foot C pitch
  by "Roy Kersey" <rkersey@tds.net>
Re: 32 foot C pitch
  by "Vern Jones" <soundres@foothill.net>
Re: OK, tell me . . .
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
RE: Chicago Holy Cross Cathedral and two ? organs
  by "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: 32' (Foot) was Re: 32" (inch) sound in speakers From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 18:19:41 +0800   OK, I'll change the subject line... that high-pitched squeel was getting to= me anyway. Caused an awful beating when coupled to normal 4', 8', or 16' s= tops.     ----- Original Message ----- From: jch <opus1100@catoe.org> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Subject: Re: 32" sound in speakers Date: Fri, 24 Dec 2004 12:11:26 -0600   >=20 > At 12:13 PM 12/24/04, you wrote: > > What is your call sign? >=20 > What has this to do with 32' sound in the speakers? >=20 > How difficult can it be to change the subject line or in this case > send a personal message to the sender instead of cluttering the list. >=20 > jch   -- Jan Nijhuis nijhuis@email.com   --=20 ___________________________________________________________ Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm    
(back) Subject: Christmas Bonus from Organs and Organists Online From: "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 13:49:36 +0200   Dear List,   We have added a couple more items to help your Christmas Turkey on its way =   on http://www.organsandorganistsonline.com/   Jarle Fagerheim plays the "Fugue in E-flat major" (St. Anne) BWV 552 recorded earlier this week on the II/19 Jehmlich Organ in Tjensvoll = Church, Stavanger, Norway, where his mother is organist. Another example of a two manual tracker instrument offering a rich, crisp sound. A rhythmically = vital performance.   Also playing a two manual tracker instrument, the II/20 Dobson Organ Mckinley Presbyterian Church Champaign, Illinois, USA, is Scott Montgomery - the First movement of the Widor Vth symphony, op 42., again, taken from his recent recital there. Michael Dudman's performance of this work on the 2 manual Grant, Degens = and Rippin organ in St Mary of Eton, Hackney, recorded 40 years ago, makes an interesting comparison, as this organ has also been discussed on the list not so long ago. It is one of the most consistently downloaded files on = the site.   John Foss   Organists Off Topic http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/ Topics of the week : The origins of life; A practical lesson in Political Incorrectnes; Today's science lesson; (Photos) Large boats on the Mississippi and Greek freight trains in winter      
(back) Subject: Joy to the World From: "Harry Grove" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 12:37:56 -0000   Just like everybody else who might read this posting - I've been busy "Bringing tidings of Great Joy to all mankind" . . . . . or at least all those within my reach.   I have just returned home from my morning services in time to offer Christnmas lunch to the elderly within my family - aged 97, 94, 85 and 81, =   respectively - so I've got my hands full.   And there's St. Stephen's Day services, tomorrw (to look forward to).   "So ...................... in the meantime .............................. in-between time ............................. 'Let's all have FUN'!"   Joy to you all.   Harry Grove [a.k.a. a musicman determined to have FUN - at all costs]      
(back) Subject: Last Verses for Organ From: "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 08:28:50 -0500   Dale said, in response to a question about last verses: "Certainly the two collections (100 in each) by T. Tertius Noble are essential. (H.W. Gray, Belwin). If those are out of print, heaven help us all! OHS, there's a project!"   I don't know if they're still in print, but I acquired both volumes on = Ebay for a decent price. I'd concur that in traditional style, TTN's work is without peer. As Dale pointed out, opinions and needs will differ in terms of what's "best" for an individual congregation, though.   I have several of the Mayhew collections and find they have some good material, although I don't like to bother learning an alternate harmonization unless the melody is altered. Otherwise it seems like too = much effort for such little variety that the average person in the pew's not likely to notice.   I like to piece together short alternate intros (on familiar tunes) and codas from--among other sources--Malcolm Archer's "After the Last Verse" = and June Nixon's "Organ Miniatures." Those are both published by Mayhew and = are good sources for me for postludes, as well.   Regulars will know I've only been on my current job for 6 months. I was attempting short interludes between hymn verses for a while, too, although = I stopped after one Sunday when I failed to adequately clue the congregation in to what I was doing and they started singing the next verse. It took me most of a phrase to get back into sync with them and I've been rattled about trying that ever since.   Another time they thought I was playing an interlude when in fact I'd launched into an alternate harmonization. I know what happened that time--the first few notes of the melody in the alternate were not the same as the original and that confused them. Now when I play a verse of an alternate I *always* adjust for that problem <g>.    
(back) Subject: Re: Glasgow, Scotland From: "Arno Schuh" <arno.schuh@in-trier.de> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 14:42:02 +0100   Hi, perhaps this CD might be interesting to get an impression: http://www.delphianrecords.co.uk/webshop/DCD34032.html   Greetings   Arno    
(back) Subject: Mexico (x-post) From: "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 10:48:22 -0500   Hi, Lists:   Does anyone have any particular suggestions and/or contacts in Mexico = City, Puebla, or Guanajuato?   I'm going down for a bit over a week on Epiphany, and would love any info anyone has to spare.   Paul   http://www.sover.net/~popel/agomain.html      
(back) Subject: Re: fancy footwork video clip wanted From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 08:44:07 -0600   Hey, Andy: One of our more accomplished footwork artists is Joyce Jones, and, if anyone has video of her excellent footwork, I bet she has some that might be available. Joyce Jones is professor or organ, etc., at Baylor University. F. Richard Burt Dorian Organs ..    
(back) Subject: Re: fancy footwork video clip wanted From: "C. Joseph Nichols" <cjn@nicholsandsimpson.com> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 09:05:46 -0600     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>   > Does anyone know of a video clip out there in the world wide wasteland > that > shows tricky organ footwork?   Here is a link to Hector Olivera's website. The most amazing footwork display happens at 7:00 minutes into the video clip. I believe Hector "wowed" the AGO in LA with this same piece "The Flight of the Bumble Bee = and Tico Tico".   Having seen Hector do his thing with his "machine" for a Community = Concerts event and the next night do a completely straight classical concert on a pipe organ, I am indeed impressed.   http://www.hectorolivera.com/store/japan.html   C. Joseph Nichols Nichols & Simpson, Inc. http://www.nicholsandsimpson.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Glasgow, Scotland From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 10:55:14 EST   Kelvingrove Art Gallery, definitely. An important instrument in a great secular setting, using the galleries off of the main hall as additional = reverbance chambers. A pyrotomic tutti, and a good example of how a moderate-sized = organ can do great things.   If you can get away to Edinburgh, play the Rieger at Saint Giles' = Cathedral.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Merry Christmas - Off Topic From: "Keith Zimmerman" <kwzimmerman@alltel.net> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 11:01:54 -0500   Pipechatters,   My dad set the following to me. Enjoy. Merry Christmas, Keith ______________   I'm Offended That You're Offended - Merry Christmas Anyway! By Debbie Daniel December 13, 2004 I'm on a "Merry Christmas" mission and I'm in full throttle. My little yellow VW Beetle has turned into a Christmas billboard with Merry Christmas written across the back window. Yes, I've decided to trek off to work everyday on the public highways with a message that seems to offend people. At stop lights, I even turn my music up a little louder, and to top it off, I sing along with it. Don't I know that stopping at a red light to roll my windows down only to share the joy of Christmas carols on public streets is a No-No? Don't I fear the Christmas Gestapo and those who would have me remove the written message from my car? I'm sorry folks, but the only person I'm concerned about "offending" during this Christmas season is the Lord himself. LEAVE THAT MANGER ALONE! We've allowed the Baby Jesus to be kicked out of His lowly manger, and those offended by Christmas are still not happy. I refuse to let this happen. I'm going to do my part to make sure "Merry Christmas" doesn't become extinct. Because like it or not, if the believers in Christmas don't take a stand now, it's gone forever. Listen folks, the Christian community has been underestimated before; we will have to show ourselves again. I walked into a Wendy's Restaurant the other day and was rather exuberant with my "Merry Christmas" greeting to the manager. He didn't have much of a response and I said, "Where's your Christmas spirit?" He said, "We're not allowed to use the words "Merry Christmas" when greeting customers. We can only say "Happy Holiday." This morning I grabbed a quick breakfast at a Whataburger Restaurant. I noticed there wasn't a single decoration in the store. I asked the manager why they weren't decorated for Christmas. He told me the corporate headquarters decided not to send any decorations to any of their stores, and he didn't know why. After I heard about all the Macy's and Federated Stores taking down their Merry Christmas signs, the Target stores not allowing the Salvation Army to "Ring the Christmas bells," and the many incidents of children, choirs, and bands not allowed to play or sing Christmas carols, I realized it was happening right here in my own little Texas = town. How can this be? Not Texas! We do, however, have a store, Hobby Lobby, that plays nothing but Christmas carols during the season. On Christmas Day they run a full page ad in our local newspaper. That ad is not to promote the store, but uses the entire page to tell the story of Jesus' birth. Now that's taking a stand. We need to thank them. When I saw a news report the other evening of children being taught new words to a song we've sung for years - "We Wish You a Merry Christmas" - I was saddened to hear "We Wish You a Splendid Holiday." I know now that it's just a matter of time that the "Merry Christmas" greetings will be gone. Look around your town. Notice the "Holiday" greetings and not "Christmas." It's happening right before our very eyes. Start singing the songs; go down the streets of America singing to your heart's content. Get some of those wash-off markers that these kids use to write on their car windows when they're rooting for their hometown football team. It's easy to do, and if a torrential rain washes it off, write it on there again. We've got to get this message out. "Go Tell It On the Mountain . . that Jesus Christ is Born." Sing it, speak it, be a billboard for our = Lord. The story of this "Baby Jesus" alone has brought about more goodwill at this time of year than any other day we celebrate. How can we sit back and allow Him to be snuffed out of our lives? Is it Jesus, or is it His followers that the "offended" don't like? What kind of revulsion galvanizes one to campaign so vehemently against the mere mention of His name, the mere singing of a carol, or the mere visual of a sign that says "Merry Christmas?" I can listen to my own boss at work use some of the vilest words and follow up with, "Excuse my French." I may cringe inside at his damning of God's name, but I tolerate it. So if you don't like me wishing you a "Merry Christmas," I'll say, "Excuse my joy." You may cringe that I celebrate the birth of Jesus, but just tolerate it. I cannot be concerned that "Merry Christmas" offends you. If I'm not careful, the day will come when saying I'm a Christian will offend you. I'm offended that you're offended. How about that? When we get to a point that we can no longer take part in a tradition we hold dear, we have no choice; we either defend that tradition or we give it up to those who say NO. That's it . . . period. So, which will it be? I'm not giving up my "Merry Christmas" joy to anyone. If I know of someone that celebrates another holiday during this time of year, I will be glad to wish them whatever holiday they want. Just tell me what it is and I'll shout it to the world and wish you a grand celebration. Just give me Christmas. To you merchants: Stop being so hypocritical and "filling your tills" on the back of Jesus! Who do you think is the symbol of giving at this time of year? It was the wise men bringing gifts to the newborn Christ-child. You want your coffers full, but have ordered your employees to take down all the Merry Christmas signs. If that's the case, I'll buy gifts at a place that understands my joy.   If you're worried about offending someone, you just did. The most recent Newsweek survey shows that 82% of Americans believe that Jesus is the Son of God. So, in trying not to offend a few, you've offended many.   It's okay to jump into the "Merry Christmas" spirit when it fills your cash register, but let's call it something else . . . and don't stop giving . . and don't stop buying. . . we'll just change the name and you'll never know the difference.   I know the difference and I'm feeling it greatly. It's hard not to be aware that townships across our country have actually banned the singing of Christmas carols because it might offend someone. And it's not just the religious songs; it's the secular ones too. No more "Jingle Bells" or "Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer" because they're associated with Christmas. Boy, aren't we getting sensitive? If we're not celebrating Christmas for the hope it gives with the birth of our Savior . . . there is no hope! I noticed a few years ago that we changed the name of Abraham Lincoln's and George Washington's birthday so as to be all inclusive regarding the Presidents. Hark, if we should recognize anyone as exceptional. Now it's called Presidents' Day. Well, if we're going to be so all inclusive, next month I'll have to refer to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day as Civil Rights Leaders' Day. We don't want to exclude great Americans like Rosa Parks or Cesar Chavez, do we? And to think that Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton might be left out. We might need to change Mother's Day, Father's Day, and Grandparents' Day to All Parents' Day. Just lump them all together. It sounds ridiculous, doesn't it? So what's the difference? My freedom to celebrate Christmas in the tradition of the Christian religion is as much my right as it is your right to be offended by it. So what are we going to do? Did anyone hear me . . . what are we going to do? Do we defend a person's right to go forward with a time tested tradition (how about 2000 years?), or do we defend a person's right to end it all because they're offended? As long as we live in this great land and have the freedom to express ourselves and what we believe in, we will always offend someone. If we try to make everything right for everyone, we won't have anything for anyone. May you always have Christmas in your heart!  
(back) Subject: Re: Chicago Holy Cross Cathedral and two ? organs From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 12:31:19 EST   I watched the midnight service from Holy Cross in Chicago. There were two organs used in the service. Sorry to say, I didn't like the sound of either one. Anyone from Chicago in the know, as to why these are so disappointing. I was hoping the orgue de choire would sound good for accompaniment. It appeared to be a sizeable instrument near the altar. The pedal reeds came through and a small orchestra carried the singers. It seemed the wind sagged no matter which organ was used. Sal Soria the second organist since the big Flentrop fiasco could hardly wait to get out of town and is now in Los Angeles. What is going on there? The old organ, a cobbled together affair, gave a much better accounting. The Diapasons sang full and rich. Doesn't anyone know how to get the winding right anymore? What a disappointment. They must leak like a sieve. The voicing was also extremely rough and uneven.   Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: Re: Chicago Holy Cross Cathedral and two ? organs From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 11:55:46 -0600   Good Afternoon, Ron: Consider that most video productions do not put much importance on the quality of the sound. If you can hear the persons speak and the music sounds at all, that is supposedly good enough. Most broadcast video techs dote on the quality of the image being sent. Allowing that, the live performance in the nave may sound just fine, but placing mics for good music is usually not one of their priorities. Even so, I, too, would love to hear what the real situation is with the organ(s).   F. Richard Burt ..    
(back) Subject: Re: OK, tell me . . . From: "mack02445" <mack02445@comcast.net> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 13:06:08 -0500   Merry Christmas Glenda!   Last evening, at 6:00 PM, I went to the Church of Saint John The Evangelist, Bowdoin Street in Boston. List member William Harris is organist and director of music there at the church that was Everett Titcomb's for so many years. The Mass is Anglo-Catholic adapted to fit portions of the Book of Common Prayer. The Mass was preceded by a performance of the Vivaldi Gloria with orchestra and choir. It was indeed glorious.   The service follows the usual order with most of the usual Christmas Carols/Hymns used in the appropriate places. The Mass is mostly sung, and very ably by the Rector and staff and there is no lack of Smoke either, all in a very generous acoustic. The chants were either Plainsong or from the Mass by William Mathias. The offertory anthem was "O Magnum Mysterium" by T.L. de Victoria, and the Communion Motet was "Revelabitur gloria Domini", by William Harris and the Postlude was "Festival Voluntary" by Flor Peeters. Its been a while since I have ventured out from my own church on Christmas Eve and this was indeed a delight and an inspirational evening. It was indeed gratifying for all the senses.   Cheers, Mack in chilly Boston.   Glenda wrote:   >About a wonderful Christmas service. > >  
(back) Subject: Re: 32 foot C pitch From: "Roy Kersey" <rkersey@tds.net> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 13:07:50 -0500   Dear Alan and All, Yes, 32 foot C is 27.5 Hz for a pitch reference of A4 =3D 440 Hz. I = was using the 256 for middle C that we used in High School Physics so = things would come out even. While 24 is "about" 27.5, at that pitch, it's = more than a semitone flat! Best Regards, Roy Kersey Organ Enthusiast & Amateur Trumpeter    
(back) Subject: Re: 32 foot C pitch From: "Vern Jones" <soundres@foothill.net> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 10:42:33 -0800   Hello,   My 2 cents worth, I believe 27.500 Hz is 32' "A" and 16.352 Hz is 32' "C". This is based on the equally tempered scale with "A" 440 as the tuning standard. The intervals are based on the twelfth root of 2, out to 9 = places 1.059463094.   Use it as a multiplier for notes above 440Hz, or a divisor to derive notes below 440Hz.   Once "C" thru "C" of the middle "C" range has been derived, then it is simply multiply by 2 or divide by 2.   Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year,   Vern ----- Original Message ----- From: Roy Kersey <rkersey@tds.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, December 25, 2004 10:07 AM Subject: Re: 32 foot C pitch     > Dear Alan and All, > Yes, 32 foot C is 27.5 Hz for a pitch reference of A4 =3D 440 Hz. = I was using the 256 for middle C that we used in High School Physics so = things would come out even. While 24 is "about" 27.5, at that pitch, it's more than a semitone flat! > Best Regards, > Roy Kersey > Organ Enthusiast & Amateur Trumpeter > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >    
(back) Subject: Re: OK, tell me . . . From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 15:55:37 EST   Glenda, Mack and List:   Well, there's nothing more I can say to that! Thanks, Dave, for the lovely =   comments, and of course, for coming to Solemn High Mass last night at our = humble space on Bowdoin Street. Oh, and the Boston AFM local helped too!   Looking forward to hearing what others had to offer for Christmas.   Happy Christmas to all,   Bill Harris St. John's, Bowdoin Street, Boston.   Mack wrote: Last evening, at 6:00 PM, I went to the Church of Saint John The Evangelist, Bowdoin Street in Boston. List member William Harris is organist and director of music there at the church that was Everett Titcomb's for so many years. The Mass is Anglo-Catholic adapted to fit portions of the Book of Common Prayer. The Mass was preceded by a performance of the Vivaldi Gloria with orchestra and choir. It was indeed glorious.        
(back) Subject: RE: Chicago Holy Cross Cathedral and two ? organs From: "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 15:26:10 -0600   Don't know about any Holy Cross but Holy Name Cathedral in Chicago has a II/25 Casavant up front and a IV/117 Flentrop in the rear balcony. As = both are rather "classical" instruments and the choir is always in the back, I don't think you could refer to the Casavant as a choir organ.   For my taste, neither is suited for accompanying a liturgical service by itself. In any case, the biggest problem at Holy Name is the room itself. While it's a well-proportioned room visually, it has never been kind to music being full of dead spots and the live spots flabby at best. No, nothing sounds good in that room and the organs are less than spectacular. I suspect that televised sound can be either mediocre or rotten depending = on microphone placement.   Richard Proulx was the force behind both instruments - getting the = Casavant first while the balcony was cleared awaiting the Flentrop.   Michael     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of RonSeverin@aol.com Sent: Saturday, December 25, 2004 11:31 AM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Chicago Holy Cross Cathedral and two ? organs   I watched the midnight service from Holy Cross in Chicago. There were two organs used in the service. Sorry to say, I didn't like the sound of either one. Anyone from Chicago in the know, as to why these are so disappointing. I was hoping the orgue de choire would sound good for accompaniment. It appeared to be a sizeable instrument near the altar. The pedal reeds came through and a small orchestra carried the singers. It seemed the wind sagged no matter which organ was used. Sal Soria the second organist since the big Flentrop fiasco could hardly wait to get out of town and is now in Los Angeles. What is going on there? The old organ, a cobbled together affair, gave a much better accounting. The Diapasons sang full and rich. Doesn't anyone know how to get the winding right anymore? What a disappointment. They must leak like a sieve. The voicing was also extremely rough and uneven.