PipeChat Digest #5032 - Sunday, December 26, 2004
 
RE: Last Verses for Organ
  by "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@earthlink.net>
Re: Chicago Holy Cross Cathedral and two ? organs
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
RE: Chicago Holy Cross Cathedral and two ? organs
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: 32 foot C pitch
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Holy Name Cathedral Chicago WAS RE: Chicago Holy Cross Cathedral
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Bridesdog
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: Bridesdog
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Re: 32 foot C pitch
  by "Vern Jones" <soundres@foothill.net>
RE: OK, tell me . . .
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Snow!
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Bridesdog
  by "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net>
Chickering Grands
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: 32 foot pitches
  by "Roy Kersey" <rkersey@tds.net>
HOLY NAME in Chicago
  by "terry hicks" <Terrick@webtv.net>
Re: 32' (Foot) was Re: 32" (inch) sound in speakers
  by "Vern Jones" <soundres@foothill.net>
Re: 32 foot pitches
  by "Vern Jones" <soundres@foothill.net>
Re: Bridesdog
  by "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com>
Re: 32
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
RE: Last Verses for Organ
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Re: OK, tell me . . .
  by "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com>
Re: Bridesdog
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com>
 

(back) Subject: RE: Last Verses for Organ From: "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 15:36:34 -0600   Not sure about the best but I use the Noble "Free Organ Accompaniments to One Hundred Well-Known Hymn Tunes" and the Rawsthorne "Two Hundred Last Verses" (both available from ohs.org and any music dealer) more often than any others.     Your choice will depend in large part on the tunes in the collection. = Both of these have mainstream protestant tunes with Episcopal / Anglican emphasis. Noble was at St. Thomas Episcopal in NYC and Rawsthorne at Liverpool Anglican Cathedral. If you're looking for tunes for other denominations, these might not be the most suitable for you.     Michael       _____   From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Dominic Scullion Sent: Friday, December 24, 2004 2:25 PM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Last Verses for Organ     Does anybody know what the best book is for last verses?   DS     --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.818 / Virus Database: 556 - Release Date: 17/12/2004      
(back) Subject: Re: Chicago Holy Cross Cathedral and two ? organs From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 16:52:38 -0600   At 11:55 AM -0600 12/25/04, F. Richard Burt wrote: >Consider that most video productions do not put much >importance on the quality of the sound. If you can hear >the persons speak and the music sounds at all, that is >supposedly good enough. Most broadcast video techs >dote on the quality of the image being sent. > >Allowing that, the live performance in the nave may >sound just fine, but placing mics for good music is >usually not one of their priorities.   I have to agree with Dick on this. Last night, after coming home from the late Christmas Eve Eucharist I turned on the TV and watched part of the Christmas "Midnight Mass" (pre-recorded about 10 days ago) from the Cathedral of St. Andrew here in Little Rock. The organ is one of our company's and is a very fine instrument and IF the correct mics are used it records very well. But the music that was broadcast last night was a very poor representation of the instrument and of the choir which is very fine. You knew there was an organ supporting the singing but it didn't sound anything like it does in person. But since this is a once a year event I have a feeling that most of the audio came via the mics attached to the cameras.   On the other hand another church (Pulaski Heights UMC - http://www.phumc.com/welcome.htm) where we have an organ has a "dedicated" broadcast set-up since they broadcast their services every Sunday. The choir and organ sound more like they do in person due to the set-up that the church has in place. The church does archive their weekly broadcasts on the web site as webcasts.   BTW, the name of the cathedral in Chicago is the Cathedral of the Holy Name - Holy Cross Cathedral is in Boston!   David  
(back) Subject: RE: Chicago Holy Cross Cathedral and two ? organs From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 14:53:36 -0800 (PST)   NO...Those organs are not my favorite and I live about a 12 minute walk = from them. Im sure Sal Soria is having a MUUUUUCCH better time in LA...who = would'nt?! i have heard others in Chicago say they are dissappointing as = well. The organ at my former church, the Catholics who did not know the hymn, = "How Firm A Foundation", is part of the swell organ there from the Holy = Name Weikhart organ. But, Im happy where i am now...and Christmas = Candlelite service was just great with our 23 Rank Pells. ALL from one = period and ONE builder. (Big Toothy Smile)     From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - Find what you need with new enhanced search. Learn more.
(back) Subject: Re: 32 foot C pitch From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 18:17:35 +0000   On 12/25/04 6:07 PM, "Roy Kersey" <rkersey@tds.net> wrote:   > Dear Alan and All, > Yes, 32 foot C is 27.5 Hz for a pitch reference of A4 =3D 440 Hz. I was = using > the 256 for middle C that we used in High School Physics so things would = come > out even. While 24 is "about" 27.5, at that pitch, it's more than a = semitone > flat!   Agreed and understood. I feel better. I was afraid I was losing what minuscule mathematical sense I thought I might possess!   Alan  
(back) Subject: Holy Name Cathedral Chicago WAS RE: Chicago Holy Cross Cathedral From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 17:52:42 -0600   At 2:53 PM -0800 12/25/04, T.Desiree' Hines wrote: >The organ at my former church, the Catholics who did not know the >hymn, "How Firm A Foundation", is part of the swell organ there from >the Holy Name Weikhart organ.   The former organ at Holy Name Cathedral started out at Johnson and Son's Opus 501 in 1877. It replace either an Erben or a Henry Chant organ that burnt in the Great Chicago Fire of 1871. I'm not completely sure about exactly what the exact story is with this previous organ. I have seen references to both Henry Erben and Henry Chant - it could be that Chant rebuilt the Erben prior to the fire of 1971.   The Johnson was rebuilt and electrified by Wangerin-Weickhardt in 1919 which then had revisions made to it by Frank J. Sauter and Sons in conjunction with the Reuter Company in the 1950's including the addition of a Horizontal Trumpet poking through the case. The Trumpet, at least as I have been told the story, was a Wurlitzer Brass Trumpet from one of the theatre organs around Chicago.   David    
(back) Subject: Bridesdog From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 17:51:14 -0600   The wife of my best friend is an organist in the Church of England = (quite a good one, actually, a former student of Simon Preston and = Nicholas Kynaston.) This week she was asked to play for a wedding. The = bride was seven months pregnant and her bridesmaid was a dog. =20   Now it seems to me that there are good reasons for getting married and = bad reasons. Getting married used to be pretty much obligatory if you = were pregnant, but these days it doesn't seem a very good reason for = matrimony at all. Nevertheless, I don't imagine it is all that unusual = even now. (There are other bad reasons for matrimony. My cousin twice = removed married a princess. He should have known better than to think = that a mutual interest in horses was a good reason for getting married. = Needless to say, it didn't work out.) =20   However, it is the bit about having a dog as one's bridesmaid that = really gets me. Has anyone else come across this practice? Would one = use any special music in such cases?   John Speller
(back) Subject: Re: Bridesdog From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 18:15:50 -0600   How about Canine in D by Taco Bell?   RJL ----- Original Message -----=20 From: John L. Speller=20 To: PipeChat=20 Sent: Saturday, December 25, 2004 5:51 PM Subject: Bridesdog     However, it is the bit about having a dog as one's bridesmaid that = really gets me. Has anyone else come across this practice? Would one = use any special music in such cases?   John Speller  
(back) Subject: Re: 32 foot C pitch From: "Vern Jones" <soundres@foothill.net> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 16:34:23 -0800   Re: 32 foot C pitch27.5 is still 32' "A"   ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Alan Freed=20 To: PipeChat=20 Sent: Saturday, December 25, 2004 10:17 AM Subject: Re: 32 foot C pitch     On 12/25/04 6:07 PM, "Roy Kersey" <rkersey@tds.net> wrote:   > Dear Alan and All, > Yes, 32 foot C is 27.5 Hz for a pitch reference of A4 =3D 440 Hz. I = was using=20 > the 256 for middle C that we used in High School Physics so things = would come=20 > out even. While 24 is "about" 27.5, at that pitch, it's more than a = semitone=20 > flat!   Agreed and understood. I feel better. I was afraid I was losing what = minuscule mathematical sense I thought I might possess!   Alan=20  
(back) Subject: RE: OK, tell me . . . From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 19:00:48 -0600   Sounds glorious.     Glenda Sutton   gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of DERREINETOR@aol.com   Glenda, Mack and List:   Well, there's nothing more I can say to that! Thanks, Dave, for the lovely comments, and of course, for coming to Solemn High Mass last night at our humble space on Bowdoin Street. Oh, and the Boston AFM local helped too!   Mack wrote: Last evening, at 6:00 PM, I went to the Church of Saint John The Evangelist, Bowdoin Street in Boston. List member William Harris is organist and director of music there at the church that was Everett Titcomb's for so many years. The Mass is Anglo-Catholic adapted to fit portions of the Book of Common Prayer. The Mass was preceded by a performance of the Vivaldi Gloria with orchestra and choir. It was indeed glorious.          
(back) Subject: Snow! From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 20:36:43 -0600     Yes, that pristine, clean magical manna-water from heaven, that envelopes and transforms the drab still-dead vista into a wonderland. That stuff was predicted to fall here on Christmas Eve. I had made an advance request for it, but foolishly delegated the details of the deal to someone else. So we had sleet several times that day, but the temperature was not cold enough to sustain the sleet once it hit the ground. While it felt like 24 degrees, it was only 38, which is pretty miserable when it's wet in Florida.   Yes, we've had snow here before in my lifetime: my first when I was sixteen, again the next year (enough for a snowman), then again in 1989 on the day before Christmas Eve. The last was in 1993, the year we bought the 'farm'. We closed on the property on Valentine's Day and I stood outside bundled against the cold, still suffering from acute bronchitis, while a friend bush-hogged the property. A month later we awoke to snow, and drove out to see our property covered in white.   This year Christmas Eve at the Sutton household was a low-key family affair. One brother and his wife decided to boycott for some still unknown reason, upsetting the other brother. However, every year they have introduced some fly in the ointment, so I was not surprised. We still had a full house, enough food to feed an army and a great time.   After they all left, I sat down with the TV remote. I watched the last half of the Christmas Mass at the National RC Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception (or whatever it is called). The orchestra and choir were pretty good, and the organist (is his name Grogan?) was featured prominently. I was unable to access network TV, but found St. Peter's on a Spanish-speaking channel. I was so tired trying to decipher the Italian and the commentator's explanations in Spanish that I fell asleep before the homily. The boychoir has improved.   Today was early to rise so that dumplings could be made. We don't do those German Yankee things down here - we roll thin strips of dough and drop them in boiling seasoned broth mixed with chicken, only in this case it was turkey. The only thing that survived in my freezer after Hurricane Ivan was a container of last year's turkey and broth. An asparagus casserole and dish of turnip and mustard greens completed my offering (Mom does the dressing and my niece the desserts). Brother fried up two turkeys and baked a ham, and again we had food enough to feed several Chinese provinces.   My organic plan for this Christmas was an ice organ. Three engineers, one an organist and the other two rabid organ enthusiasts, spent many hours in R & D. Extensive negotiations were held with the neighbor's horses and the deer to operate a turnstile for power. However, we entered into protracted litigation brought by the ice hotel people over the ice, and had to resort to threatening them with a Sierra Club protest. Thankfully, since the weather did not cooperate, my attorney had insisted on multiple contingency clauses, which ended up saving me a bundle when the conditions precedent failed to occur. The attorney who screwed up the requisition for snow is now fired and relegated to teaching at University of Florida's law school.   So while I sit here watching the Weather Channel and the prediction that it will snow all around me and miss Wits' End, instead of wearing flannel, I am in a slinky nightgown. Instead of sipping Courvoisier by the fire with an Antonio Banderas look-alike, I am watching Rick don his uniform for work, watching .007 on television, seething with envy that a friend is on his way to Spain and France for the holidays, and planning something more akin to Grey Goose and orange juice. Meanwhile rain is dripping outside and the refrigerator is overflowing with leftovers. Oh well, it's Christmas in Florida. Hope your wishes, of white stuff or otherwise, were fulfilled.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Re: Bridesdog From: "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 23:07:36 -0500   I've had dogs in the procession before- sometimes as ringbearers led by a bridesmaid or young flower girl type, with the ring on a ribbon at the collar. Of the dog, that is.   How about "Wachet arf?"   Oh, right, that should be for *his* procession.   Paul Opel   At 7:15 PM -0500 12/25/4, Robert Lind wrote: > How about Canine in D by Taco Bell? RJL > > ----- Original Message ----- From: John L. Speller To: >PipeChat Sent: Saturday, December 25, 2004 5:51 PM Subject: >Bridesdog > However, it is the bit about having a dog as one's bridesmaid that >really gets me. Has anyone else come across this practice? Would one >use any special music in such cases? John Speller     http://www.sover.net/~popel/agomain.html      
(back) Subject: Chickering Grands From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 20:56:54 -0600   James--the medium sized Chickering I practiced on in college was almost certainly the 1908-1030's era. The Smithsonian recording of Gottschalk music is an 1865 concert grand--and it is magnificent. For those interested, the performer is Lambert Orkis, and the CD is ND 033, Smithsonian Collection, 1988, title: Gottschalk Piano Music.\   Dennis Steckley Lover of Cats, Pipe Organs & 1940-65 Sewing Machines    
(back) Subject: Re: 32 foot pitches From: "Roy Kersey" <rkersey@tds.net> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 22:40:30 -0500   Dear Learned Musicians, That last post was a little like your voice lesson, where they told = you to think one note and sing another. . . I was thinking piano low A but = I wrote, out of the title, 32 foot C. Yes, finally, I agree that 27.5 is = the 32 foot A. Sorry to muddy the water. I seem to be cursed, I wrote = 32" C rather than 32' C, and a while back I wrote $2,000 a stop rather = than $20,000 . . . I'll try to be more careful . . . Roy Kersey Sometimes Accurate Organ Enthusaist & Amateur Trumpeter    
(back) Subject: HOLY NAME in Chicago From: "terry hicks" <Terrick@webtv.net> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 19:48:55 -0800   As someone has already stated, the biggest problem is the room. That being said, broadcast recordings are pitiful as far as picking up room ambience. The paid choir often sings from the front with Casavant because the marble floor and lower ceiling project sound better.   Regarding the organs, as much as I respect Proulx, I have no insights as to why they are what they are. The Flentrop has some "organic" problems such as the case being so deep that sounds do not project into the already hampered nave. It is very nice up close, but not impressive in the nave. Why Flentrop agreed to the design of the instrument is a quandary.    
(back) Subject: Re: 32' (Foot) was Re: 32" (inch) sound in speakers From: "Vern Jones" <soundres@foothill.net> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 19:27:55 -0800   32"=3D2 2/3' or "G" at 391.995Hz based on the equally tempered scale.   Vern ----- Original Message ----- From: Jan Nijhuis <nijhuis@email.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, December 25, 2004 2:19 AM Subject: 32' (Foot) was Re: 32" (inch) sound in speakers     > OK, I'll change the subject line... that high-pitched squeel was getting to me anyway. Caused an awful beating when coupled to normal 4', 8', or = 16' stops. > > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: jch <opus1100@catoe.org> > To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Subject: Re: 32" sound in speakers > Date: Fri, 24 Dec 2004 12:11:26 -0600 > > > > > At 12:13 PM 12/24/04, you wrote: > > > What is your call sign? > > > > What has this to do with 32' sound in the speakers? > > > > How difficult can it be to change the subject line or in this case > > send a personal message to the sender instead of cluttering the list. > > > > jch > > -- > Jan Nijhuis > nijhuis@email.com > > -- > ___________________________________________________________ > Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com > http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > > >    
(back) Subject: Re: 32 foot pitches From: "Vern Jones" <soundres@foothill.net> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 19:47:47 -0800   Hello Roy,   I'm not really a nitpicker, just was trying to insert a little humor into the messages, where A=3Dsomething else, 32' "C" may very well be 27.5 Hz. = Its all in the reference, as music is still art and not science, although they are closely related. The Physics of musical instruments is a very complex subject when trying to put to math the complex sounds generated by acoustical instruments. So complex, that it still hasn't been duplicated = by electronics, even though that gap may be closing.   Merry Christmas Roy,   Vern ----- Original Message ----- From: Roy Kersey <rkersey@tds.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, December 25, 2004 7:40 PM Subject: Re: 32 foot pitches     > Dear Learned Musicians, > That last post was a little like your voice lesson, where they told you to think one note and sing another. . . I was thinking piano low A but = I wrote, out of the title, 32 foot C. Yes, finally, I agree that 27.5 is = the 32 foot A. Sorry to muddy the water. I seem to be cursed, I wrote 32" C rather than 32' C, and a while back I wrote $2,000 a stop rather than $20,000 . . . > I'll try to be more careful . . . > Roy Kersey > Sometimes Accurate Organ Enthusaist & Amateur Trumpeter > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Bridesdog From: "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 21:36:37 -0800     ----- Original Message -----=20 From: John L. Speller=20   >The wife of my best friend is an organist in the Church of England = (quite a good one, actually, a former student of Simon Preston and = >Nicholas Kynaston.) This week she was asked to play for a wedding. = The bride was seven months pregnant and her bridesmaid was a >dog. =20     >However, it is the bit about having a dog as one's bridesmaid that = really gets me. Has anyone else come across this practice? Would one = >use any special music in such cases?     No particular music in my case -- we were married 20 years ago in a = civil ceremony at a pleasant old house, a tape of the Praetorius = "Entr=E9e" from Dances from Terpsichore as processional -- but my wife's = noble black Lab, Bogart, who was already a distinguished oldster at that = point, (passing to his dogly rewards five years later aged almost 15, an = incredible age for a big guy who weighed over 120 lbs in his prime) was = her Best Dog, and came down the aisle with my brother, the Best Man. = Bogart was outfitted for the occasion in a gray top hat and a dickey, = both of which he tolerated for a few minutes with his usual good grace. = The presiding judge asked for and got a picture of himself with Bogart, = so I guess it was not an everyday event.   So I think animals can add something significant to human ceremonies. = Any theological issues didn't apply in a civil ceremony, of course, but = in the case of any conflict I know where my loyalties would lie.   MAF      
(back) Subject: Re: 32 From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Sun, 26 Dec 2004 13:56:51 +0800     HI Richard, VK6BE for 50 years! Bob=2E ---- Original Message ---- From: effarbee@verizon=2Enet To: pipechat@pipechat=2Eorg Subject: Re: 32" sound in speakers Date: Fri, 24 Dec 2004 12:13:23 -0600   >Hello, Bob: > =20 >de W5QQM > =20 >What is your call sign=3F > =20 >    
(back) Subject: RE: Last Verses for Organ From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Sun, 26 Dec 2004 14:00:11 +0800   There are several=2E Tertius Noble is one of the best but there are also others by such as June Nixon (available from Fine Music (Melbourne, Australia)=2E Bob Elms=2E > > >---- Original Message ---- >From: dominicscullion@email=2Ecom >To: pipechat@pipechat=2Eorg >Subject: RE: Last Verses for Organ >Date: Fri, 24 Dec 2004 20:24:53 -0000 > >>Does anybody know what the best book is for last verses=3F >>      
(back) Subject: Re: OK, tell me . . . From: "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com> Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 22:03:46 -0800     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>   > About a wonderful Christmas service.   Not wonderful, but nice. Good news/bad news: the candlelight service was backed up from the 10 PM of years past to 11 PM, not good for morning = people like me whose stamina plummets after 9 PM, but balanced by the fact that = for the first time I didn't have to play the children's 7 PM service as well. Not that I have minded doing that in the past, but killing the time = between the services has been a problem. I live 15 miles from the church, some of = it bad gravel road, so going home isn't a possibility; it's more practice = time than I feel like between services, so I was at the mercy of the town.   There is nothing like a small town on Christmas eve. Everything is closed, =   from the supermarket to the McDonalds. The only eating place open is a Chinese restaurant, a very bad one, a festival of corn starch and MSG. The =   hour spent there always felt like an eternity, everyone there really = wanting to be somewhere else except for bad planning, the general bleakness level something like Edward Hopper's "Nighthawks."   So I escaped that at the small price of staying up an extra hour. We did a =   nice Wexford Carol arrangement (we have a wonderful flautist in the = choir), I did Seth Bingham's At the Cradle of Jesus as offertory, candles were lit =   to the Fred Bock Peace, Peace/Silent Night. Mostly very gentle stuff, and = I think I wouldn't have chose to have to congregation leave with candles singing "Joy to the World." It took 2 runs through the 3 verses and I = think a final first verse to get them all out, and with that many repetitions I felt compelled to up the ante more than usual, treating everyone (if = that's the right word) to the Great Trompete and the Great Mixtur, normally an either/or proposition. If there had been one more verse I suppose I would have had to add the Gt-Gt 4' and send some New Year's business to local otologists.   Merry Christmas to all!   MAF    
(back) Subject: Re: Bridesdog From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> Date: Sun, 26 Dec 2004 14:57:54 +0800   That famous toccata of old "Who Let the Dogs Out?" [WARNING: The bride migh= t take offence]   If you were to go with piano music, Schroeder (of Peanuts) idolized Beethov= en; Fur Elise was a favorite.   ----- Original Message ----- From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Subject: Bridesdog Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2004 17:51:14 -0600   >=20 > The wife of my best friend is an organist in the Church of England=20 > (quite a good one, actually, a former student of Simon Preston and=20 > Nicholas Kynaston.) This week she was asked to play for a wedding.=20 > The bride was seven months pregnant and her bridesmaid was a dog. >=20 > Now it seems to me that there are good reasons for getting married=20 > and bad reasons. Getting married used to be pretty much obligatory=20 > if you were pregnant, but these days it doesn't seem a very good=20 > reason for matrimony at all. Nevertheless, I don't imagine it is=20 > all that unusual even now. (There are other bad reasons for=20 > matrimony. My cousin twice removed married a princess. He should=20 > have known better than to think that a mutual interest in horses=20 > was a good reason for getting married. Needless to say, it didn't=20 > work out.) >=20 > However, it is the bit about having a dog as one's bridesmaid that=20 > really gets me. Has anyone else come across this practice? Would=20 > one use any special music in such cases? >=20 > John Speller   -- Jan Nijhuis nijhuis@email.com   --=20 ___________________________________________________________ Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm