PipeChat Digest #5050 - Friday, December 31, 2004
 
RE: Let's Please Quote Virgil Fox Correctly
  by "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com>
RE: Bad kids
  by "Dominic Scullion" <dominicscullion@email.com>
Re: spitzfloten und other flutes
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Father of 7 kids has his say.
  by "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca>
 

(back) Subject: RE: Let's Please Quote Virgil Fox Correctly From: "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com> Date: Fri, 31 Dec 2004 03:27:10 -0800   =3D-> Lew Williams wrote,   I believe that Mr. Fox [* ~c] has been done a disservice by being misquoted.... To my knowledge, Virgil Fox never made the statement "You stink to high heaven" to anyone.   <-=3D     I quote:   "Virgil wanted everyone to dress nicely and to look clean and well cared for. The idea of body odor ("stinking to high heaven," as he would put it) to anyone who took as many baths as Virgil ... was unacceptable. He would tell someone right immediately. "Honey! You stink!"   -- "Virgil Fox - The Dish" by Richard Torrance & Marshall Yaeger, Circles International Publishing, Copyright =A92001 by Richard Torrance and Marshall Yaeger.   (From page 255, in an anecdote written and contributed by Albert Fuller, "a long-time Julliard School faculty member, and author of 'Alice Tully: An Intimate Portrait.'")   So, if anyone is guilty of misquoting, it would be Dr. Fuller. But I rather doubt that he is "guilty as charged."   ~ C   ------- * n.b., It would be Dr. Fox, not Mr. Fox - he was awarded an honorary doctorate by Bucknell University in 1963.      
(back) Subject: RE: Bad kids From: "Dominic Scullion" <dominicscullion@email.com> Date: Fri, 31 Dec 2004 13:56:40 -0000   Randy,   I agree that there are thoughtless parents out there. But as someone who = has dealt with keeping a small child amused at church, I can tell you it is no easy task.   It is also usually the parishioners with no experience of dealing with = kids that complain. To them I say get a grip.   DS     _____   From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Randolph Runyon Sent: 29 December 2004 23:15 To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Bad kids       On Dec 29, 2004, at 5:38 PM, Dominic Scullion wrote:   What I am saying is that you have no right to expect children to be quiet = at church. It is very difficult to get children to stay quiet in any occasion especially church. And by meaning about the concert was that children = cannot see the validity or importance of prayer, music or worship. They will be noisy.   DS     I agree. My problem is with the parents. I'm not speaking on behalf of myself as organist, since as long as I've done my job and they pay me I'm happy, but rather on behalf of the poor worshipper whose worship is disturbed by thoughtless parents. I don't worship at the church where I play, but I do try my best to contribute to a worshipful experience for those who do.   But then I saw your reply to Charles Lester: "Yes it is distracting, but anyone should be allowed to go to Church including children. Adults can learn to deal with the screaming." Huh? Are you serious?   R. Runyon            
(back) Subject: Re: spitzfloten und other flutes From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Fri, 31 Dec 2004 10:41:37 EST   Dear Scot:   Spitzfloten go back centuries -- you have just encountered a particularly unattractive or poorly voiced example. To respond to a response:   In a message dated 12/29/04 10:54:59 PM, RonSeverin@aol.com writes:   <<"I've always felt that a good Harmonic Flute would always work better = on the Great than another 'Hybred' principalish flute. Heck, if you had an = 8' Bourdon on the great I'd have a 4' Harmonic flute and by transmission = wire it in at 8' also with 12 bass notes from the Bourdon. You could use it at both pitches at different times.">>   Since there is no literature that specifically calls for the Harmonic = Flute at 4', but the 8' version is almost ubiquitous in not only the French = Romantic literature, but occurs often in other schools of organbuilding, the = Harmonic Flute should appear at 8' first, when at all possible. If one is going to stopper the bottom octave, try to at least make ONE extra pipe, BB, open. = That way, when you land on that final B in the left hand of the Franck Prelude, = Fugue, and Variation, you don't end on a weak, gutless, and non-matching timbre.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City glucknewyork.com   ..  
(back) Subject: Father of 7 kids has his say. From: "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca> Date: Fri, 31 Dec 2004 12:07:09 -0500   It's time I step in. I'm self-employed in the pipe organ business and my wife is a part time organist. I am also the father of 7 children = procreated with the organist. None of them is older than 12 years.   My children do not misbehave in church and they can sit through an hour = long service without being entertained with crayons and food and all the other stuff that's offered them by those who usually have little knowledge of children.   Are my kids exceptional? Not really.   How do I get them to sit through a church service without disrupting = anyone?   After they've been released from the nursery/toddler room around the age = of 4 they are introduced to the pew and there they must sit and stand when everyone else sits and stands. If they don't conform to what I, their = older brother and sisters and everyone else is doing (they never do the first time, I don't expect them to) they are removed quietly from the church to the van in the parking lot and warned of an unpleasant consequence if they don't conform. This worked with one of my children. All the others tested my resolve and suffered the consequence of non conformance. I think two of them required a 2nd reminder. My role in this arrangement (besides dispensing "correction") is to be = seen as someone who can be trusted to follow through (without anger) to the letter with what they promised to do in situations both good and bad.   It's that simple. They learn at that point that they can rely and depend = on at least one person in their life and that gives them great comfort and tremendous security.   What does the child gain sitting through a church service that they cannot (may not) comprehend?   They learn how to concentrate on something.   The "something" is sitting still and not making noise for about an hour. Once they've learned to concentrate they've been given the keys to = acquiring knowledge. One cannot learn without being able to concentrate. None of my children require "Ritalin" to control hyper-activity. I cannot deny that some children truly require this medicine but I cannot believe that up to = 5% of N.A. children truly require this drug. I think most of them have never been taught the discipline of = concentration.   If anyone's read this far and is entrusted with the care of children and = is open to free advise, here's something that's vital (I think):   Never correct a child in public. Never chastise a child in public. Praise them in public when it's due. Correct them in private so they are = not humiliated. Children hate humiliation and justifiably so. But they unknowingly crave correction, in private, when it's required and when the corrector is in not angry. Correction governed and tempered by anger is abusive. The child can clearly see that an angry corrector is merely = taking advantage of the fact they are usually bigger and stronger and the correction is wasted--at best.   I do not think the late Dr. Spock would not have endorsed my methods but they are supported by what was once known as "common-sense". Today I think it could be better named: "uncommon-sense".   Children can sit through a church service and when they do, the adults around them end-up liking and respecting them and treating them nicely afterwards..... there's no end to the good that develops.   Sincerely,   AjMead -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of Dominic Scullion Sent: Friday, December 31, 2004 8:57 AM To: 'PipeChat' Subject: RE: Bad kids     Randy,   I agree that there are thoughtless parents out there. But as someone who has dealt with keeping a small child amused at church, I can tell you it = is no easy task.   It is also usually the parishioners with no experience of dealing with kids that complain. To them I say get a grip.   DS         ---------------------------------------------------------------------------= - --   From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Randolph Runyon Sent: 29 December 2004 23:15 To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Bad kids         On Dec 29, 2004, at 5:38 PM, Dominic Scullion wrote:   What I am saying is that you have no right to expect children to be = quiet at church. It is very difficult to get children to stay quiet in any = occasion especially church. And by meaning about the concert was that children cannot see the validity or importance of prayer, music or worship. They will be noisy.   DS     I agree. My problem is with the parents. I'm not speaking on behalf of myself as organist, since as long as I've done my job and they pay me I'm happy, but rather on behalf of the poor worshipper whose worship is disturbed by thoughtless parents. I don't worship at the church where I play, but I do try my best to contribute to a worshipful experience for those who do.   But then I saw your reply to Charles Lester: "Yes it is distracting, but anyone should be allowed to go to Church including children. Adults can learn to deal with the screaming." Huh? Are you serious?   R. Runyon