PipeChat Digest #4297 - Monday, February 23, 2004
 
RE: Notre Dame-des-Neiges
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
RE: Content Organs
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
Re: Mormon organs
  by <OMusic@aol.com>
Arnold Loxam to be featured on RTR FM. (cross-posted)
  by "Kenneth Evans" <kevans1@rochester.rr.com>
RE: Arnold Loxam to be featured on RTR FM. (cross-posted)
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
Re: another Richard White piece
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: PipeChat Digest #4296 - 02/23/04
  by "Christopher Howerter" <OrgelspielerKMD@msn.com>
Re: Notre Dame-des-Neiges
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Memphis Kimball
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Squeaking at Naumburg
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: PipeChat Digest #4296 - 02/23/04
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: acoustics
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
Re: acoustics
  by "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net>
Re: Memphis Kimball
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Nunc Dimittis Berj Zamkochian   X-Posted
  by "Charlie Jack" <Charlie@Jack.NET>
Re: First Baptist Church, Jackson, Mississippi
  by "Douglas A. Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com>
A series of near-Holy Land experiences, Part 1 of 2
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
 

(back) Subject: RE: Notre Dame-des-Neiges From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2004 10:28:00 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   This organ was architecturally designed by Jean Marol and its spec was designed by Jean Guillou. Not just a large instrument, but sounds terrific. Built = by Detlef Kleuker Orgelbau GmbH, who were always open minded to bold designs and new ideas.   Cheers Andres =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.      
(back) Subject: RE: Content Organs From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2004 10:31:53 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   Hi all   The Infant & Youth Symphonic Orchestra of Venezuela has one of these- model D 2800, 3 manuals, tracker touch, lots of gadgets from tuning into several historic temperaments to trem speed adjust to MIDI. Nice practicing instrument. The Firm calls or writes regularly if everything is OK, that throws a good light on them. Despite our ever-fluctuationg electric power supply they didn't have = trouble to this day with the instrument [knock wood! <G>]   This Digital is considered a "provisorium" until the new building of the System/Foundation is finished and gets its 3 man / 40+ Klais.   Andres =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.    
(back) Subject: Re: Mormon organs From: <OMusic@aol.com> Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2004 09:49:02 EST   I respect your disagreement about turnovers. You are in a different part = of the country than we. Keith spent many years in the Mormon church in = Texas. That was my only resource. Eyrline    
(back) Subject: Arnold Loxam to be featured on RTR FM. (cross-posted) From: "Kenneth Evans" <kevans1@rochester.rr.com> Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2004 10:48:52 -0500   Arnold Loxam will be highlighted as the featured theatre organist on RTR FM's "Theatre Organ Time" on Friday, February 27 at 9:00 PM EST. The program, carried on the world-wide web, originates in their studios in Perth, Australia at 10 AM Saturday Western Australia time. The URL is http://www.rtrfm.com.au/listen.htm . You will need Microsoft Windows Media Program for listening to the stream of audio. If you don't have it now, = they have a link on the above site for downloading.   England's Dr. Arnold Loxam is celebrating his 74th year as a professional musician and his 58th year as a very-talented theatre organist. He is = known to his many North American fans for his late spring tours of northeastern = US and Ontario Canada venues that brought so much happiness to his audiences from his spirited playing of wonderful theatre organ music and his great display of humor from the bench. In the UK he is known for his many BBC broadcasts, his many albums and his extensive touring there that still continues .   Several years ago Arnold stopped his tours of the 'colonies' because of = his busy schedule and Audrey's (his wife of 53 years) increasing fear of = flying after some of the recent aircraft mishaps. His fans have missed the live tours, but fortunately we are able to hear him through his many recordings and see him in his video releases.   And now we will be able to hear him via the web!   Submitted by, Ken Evans    
(back) Subject: RE: Arnold Loxam to be featured on RTR FM. (cross-posted) From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2004 16:14:55 -0000   I can recommend you listen to this! But it is a pity that you won't be = able to see it, for Arnold is famous also for the "Loxam Bounce" - where this lively artist actually leaves the bench twice per bar in such favourites = as "The Woodchopper's Ball"   Will Light Coventry UK     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Kenneth Evans Sent: 23 February 2004 15:49 To: Theatreorgans-L; Piporg-L Mailing List; Pipe Chat Subject: Arnold Loxam to be featured on RTR FM. (cross-posted)   Arnold Loxam will be highlighted as the featured theatre organist on RTR FM's "Theatre Organ Time" on Friday, February 27 at 9:00 PM EST. The program, carried on the world-wide web, originates in their studios in Perth, Australia at 10 AM Saturday Western Australia time. The URL is http://www.rtrfm.com.au/listen.htm . You will need Microsoft Windows = Media Program for listening to the stream of audio. If you don't have it now, = they have a link on the above site for downloading.   England's Dr. Arnold Loxam is celebrating his 74th year as a = professional musician and his 58th year as a very-talented theatre organist. He is = known to his many North American fans for his late spring tours of = northeastern US and Ontario Canada venues that brought so much happiness to his = audiences from his spirited playing of wonderful theatre organ music and his great display of humor from the bench. In the UK he is known for his many BBC broadcasts, his many albums and his extensive touring there that still continues .   Several years ago Arnold stopped his tours of the 'colonies' because of = his busy schedule and Audrey's (his wife of 53 years) increasing fear of = flying after some of the recent aircraft mishaps. His fans have missed the live tours, but fortunately we are able to hear him through his many = recordings and see him in his video releases.   And now we will be able to hear him via the web!   Submitted by, Ken Evans   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Re: another Richard White piece From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2004 11:33:02 -0500   On 2/23/04 1:42 AM, "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> wrote:   > Feel free to share the links on Organchat if you like as well. > It will be my pleasure to accept that invitation!   Alan        
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #4296 - 02/23/04 From: "Christopher Howerter" <OrgelspielerKMD@msn.com> Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2004 11:35:20 -0500   Dear List,   I must mention that when I wrote the previous post that it was 11 p.m. = at night and my thoughts were not all so collected, so to speak. Such a = large organ as the Hildebrant in Naumburg, of course, had such = upperwork, as it was huge by 18th century standards. Though, I meant to = speak about the organ in Arnstadt, actually. Some other quotations were = off as well, I'm sure. Though, don't you just love the sound of the 16' = reed under the plenum? I must say I personally don't care for anything = neo-classical/baroque, so what ever that should mean...   Sincerely, Christopher J. Howerter, SPC (who is not going to be posting messages at = 11 p.m. anymore)   P.S. Always remember what the 18th century English poet, Alexander = Pope said... ----------------------------------------------------------------------   Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #4294 - 02/21/04 From: "Christopher Howerter" = <OrgelspielerKMD@msn.com<mailto:OrgelspielerKMD@msn.com>> Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2004 22:25:22 -0500   Dear List,   I would like to say that indeed Sebastian has it right when he = mentioned about how off we've been concerning the registrations of Bach. = I would invite you all to purchase the CD made on the Nammburg Organ = (perhaps misspelled). This organ is the only surviving one that Bach = designed, I believe. There is even a website on it that has all of the = restoration processes on it. It is the organ with the blue stop jambs = and the 16' Principal on the Great, 32' Reed and Principal in the pedal, = and no mutations or independent 2's! So you can just throw away all of = your 8' 4' and 1 1/3', etc. neo-baroque, cutesy-pie registrations. :) = When I first heard the CD, it astounded me. It sounded quite "romantic" = to me ears, yet it was clear and somewhat bright, if you will. However, = not the type of bright that comes from a ten rank 2/3' mixture...HA!!! = Also, on an American organ, if the 8' Hautbois/Oboe is too present, then = it should not be used at all with the foundations. The St. Clothilde = organ Hautbois was very distant sounding as the Recit division was the = in the back of the case. This is why I believe (as in the PFV) that two = flutes were used with it, in order to beef-it-up, so to speak (I'm sure = Sebastian knows all about that...). :) Nevertheless, the same idea was = behind it's use with the Trumpet, I'm sure. I guess I've said enough = and I'm too tired to continue on...lucky for you...haha!   Cheers, Christopher J. Howerter, SPC Director of Music & Organist St. Paul's Lutheran Church Bethlehem, PA Cell: (610) 462-8017 Subject: Re: Books on registration - theory and practice From: = <TubaMagna@aol.com<mailto:TubaMagna@aol.com<mailto:TubaMagna@aol.com<mail= to:TubaMagna@aol.com>>> Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2004 11:19:12 EST   It's not as simple as it looks, especially for French literature = of all=20 periods, where organbuilders and organist/composers collaborated and =   communicated. Most French Classic organ literature cannot be = accurately played on=20 American organs, because most organs were designed with the wrong = stops in the wrong=20 divisions at the wrong pitches. And you might consider the 8' Hautbois a reed, but it was = considered part=20 of the foundations in 19th century French organbuilding. It was = frequently=20 drawn with all of the 8' flues in the Recit for a very specific = sound, and was=20 also often drawn with the Trompette. This is why the disastrous = American=20 practice of placing it at 4' makes it worthless, both in solo, and = in combination. Take the time to read some more scholarly works, like = Fesperman's tome on=20 The Language of the Classical French Organ, and study Rollin Smith's = writings=20 on performance practice in the Romantic period. Treatises on = organbuilding=20 can often tell you much more about registration than organ playing = books that=20 have gone through multiple editions without much scholarly updating = over the=20 decades. If you think our views on French registration are skewed, = wait until you=20 find out how off we have been about the sounds that Bach might have = heard.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City        
(back) Subject: Re: Notre Dame-des-Neiges From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2004 11:48:36 -0500   On 2/22/04 4:39 AM, "quilisma@cox.net" <quilisma@cox.net> wrote:   > Not sure I can send >> attachments to the list so if anyone is interested, I'll give you a = peek >> off-list. Purrrrrrrrr . . .   Well, no, you can't. But I'd love to have a peek!   Thanks.   Alan Freed acfreed0904@earthink.net    
(back) Subject: Memphis Kimball From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2004 11:19:17 -0600   Scott......thanks so much for your magnificent words on the Memphis = Kimball. Alas, I have never had the opportunity to hear a big auditorium Kimball. = It is a shame that the Memphis one is rotting and rusting away.   If only someone somewhere could use it, it could come back to life like a phoenix. Yes, it would be expensive, but oh, the glory!   If I ever win the lottery..............   Dennis Steckley & A Six-Pack of Cats    
(back) Subject: Squeaking at Naumburg From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2004 10:01:16 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   I cannot even begin to guess to source of Christopher's mis-information, but if we are discussing the same Hilderbrandt Organ of Naumburg, then he is hopelessly wide of the mark.   The ORIGINAL specification ("possibly" designed by Bach, but certainly played by him) had the following stops contained within the specification.   PEDAL     Nachthorn 2ft Mixture 7rks   HAUPTWERK   Weitpfeife 2ft Sesqiultera 2rks Cornet 4rks Mixtur 8rks   OBERWERK   Quinta 2.2/3 Octav 2 Waldflote 2 Tertia 1.3/5 Quinta 1.1/3 Sufflott 1 Scharff 5rks   POSOTIVE   Nasat 2.2/3 Octav 2 Rauschpfeif 2rks Ciimbel 5rks     Nice to know that the modern romantics such as Francis Jackson's "Diversion for Mixtures" can be played on this outstanding instrument!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK         --- Christopher Howerter <OrgelspielerKMD@msn.com> wrote: > Dear List, > > I would like to say that indeed Sebastian has it > right when he mentioned about how off we've been > concerning the registrations of Bach. I would > invite you all to purchase the CD made on the > Nammburg Organ (perhaps misspelled). This organ is > the only surviving one that Bach designed, I > believe. There is even a website on it that has all > of the restoration processes on it. It is the organ > with the blue stop jambs and the 16' Principal on > the Great, 32' Reed and Principal in the pedal, and > no mutations or independent 2's! So you can just > throw away all of your 8' 4' and 1 1/3', etc. > neo-baroque, cutesy-pie registrations...... not the > type of bright that comes from a ten rank 2/3' > mixture...HA!!!     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail SpamGuard - Read only the mail you want. http://antispam.yahoo.com/tools  
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #4296 - 02/23/04 From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2004 10:04:32 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Sorry to Chris, I hadn't seen his later post re: the Naumburg Hilderbrandt.   I'm sorry he doesn't care for anything neo-baroque, but I have a funny feeling that he would be bowled over by the sound of the organ I play regularly!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Christopher Howerter <OrgelspielerKMD@msn.com> wrote: > Dear List, > > I must mention that when I wrote the previous post > that it was 11 p.m. at night and my thoughts were > not all so collected, so to speak.   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail SpamGuard - Read only the mail you want. http://antispam.yahoo.com/tools  
(back) Subject: RE: acoustics From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2004 18:59:41 -0500   > Anyone visiting the NIU music building will find the four-storey = stairwells=20 have phenomenal acoustics! I found the showers in Gilbert Hall however = to=20 have had a much better bloom! The whole facility was T-shaped with the =   Great Hall of Sinks leading into the expansive Hall of Showers. The=20 entirety was tiled. Magnificent!     Our high school orchestra rehearsed in a room below the stage of the = auditorium. Four windowless dressing rooms opened off adjacent, each = maybe ten feet by twenty, which we occasionally used as practice rooms. = There were no carpets or acoustic tiles in these rooms. There was echo: = it must have been at least a second, maybe two. =20   But I didn't like it. Should I have? Sometimes reverberation is a = noble effect. Other times it's just a nasty standing wave. I can glory = in all 9 seconds of acoustics at St. John the Divine in New York. But = when I hear tell of several seconds in a rather small place, I can't = help thinking of those dark, dismal dressing/practice rooms from my high = school days. How does one build a small church or auditorium that = produces generous reverberation of the good kind rather than the bad?    
(back) Subject: Re: acoustics From: "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net> Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2004 18:48:00 -0600   Diffusion not absorbtion. Hard, solid, convoluted, nonparallel surfaces! It is really rather simple. Roy Redman ----- Original Message ----- From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, February 23, 2004 5:59 PM Subject: RE: acoustics     > > Anyone visiting the NIU music building will find the four-storey stairwells > have phenomenal acoustics! I found the showers in Gilbert Hall however = to > have had a much better bloom! The whole facility was T-shaped with the > Great Hall of Sinks leading into the expansive Hall of Showers. The > entirety was tiled. Magnificent! > > > Our high school orchestra rehearsed in a room below the stage of the auditorium. Four windowless dressing rooms opened off adjacent, each = maybe ten feet by twenty, which we occasionally used as practice rooms. There were no carpets or acoustic tiles in these rooms. There was echo: it must have been at least a second, maybe two. > > But I didn't like it. Should I have? Sometimes reverberation is a = noble effect. Other times it's just a nasty standing wave. I can glory in all = 9 seconds of acoustics at St. John the Divine in New York. But when I hear tell of several seconds in a rather small place, I can't help thinking of those dark, dismal dressing/practice rooms from my high school days. How does one build a small church or auditorium that produces generous reverberation of the good kind rather than the bad? > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Memphis Kimball From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2004 17:57:19 -0800 (PST)   AHHHHHHHHHHHH A KIMBALL! I like...a tallk well tanned man from Italy...Simply Magnificent! I frequently play the Kimball and Worlds largest enclosed organ at First = Baptist Congregational Church in Chicago (Which byu the way, Monty = Bennett, is a predominantly upper Middle class Black church like yours)   The Memphis Kimball is on sale at OCH isnt it?       From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60649 http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html   --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail SpamGuard - Read only the mail you want.  
(back) Subject: Nunc Dimittis Berj Zamkochian X-Posted From: "Charlie Jack" <Charlie@Jack.NET> Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2004 21:03:09 -0500   It is my sad duty to report that my good friend, concert organist Berj Zamkochian died today February 23, 2004 after a short illness. For those who may be interested, the details of his wake and funeral are below. I will post a more complete obituary tomorrow. Also, I will shortly have a web site up and running that will chronicle his life at http://home.comcast.net/~GomidasOrgan. The site will allow you to leave stories, anectotes and general rememberances of Berj as well as reflect on his life and accomplishments.   Charlie Jack Charlie@Jack.NET   Wake: Friday February 27 from 5:00 to 8:00 Pm at the Giragosian Funeral Home, 576 Mt. Auburn Street, Watertown Massachusetts (617)-924-0606.   Funeral Service: Saturday February 28th at Holy Cross Armenian Catholic Church, 200 Lexington Street, Belmont Massachusetts.   Expressions of sympathy may be made in his memory to the Gomidas Organ Fund, c/o Charles W. Jack at 16 Robinhood Road, Natick, MA 01760 or to the Congregazione Armena Mechitarista of Venice, Italy c/o Atty Joseph S. Carnabuci 21 Torrey Street, Brockton, MA 02301.  
(back) Subject: Re: First Baptist Church, Jackson, Mississippi From: "Douglas A. Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com> Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2004 20:33:07 -0500     If the organ turns out like QPO's recent rebuild of the 1968 Moller in St. Paul's Cathedral , Syracuse, NY....it will not be "acceptable"...it will be SPECTACULAR !!!!!!!!!!!!     Douglas A. Campbell Skaneateles, NY  
(back) Subject: A series of near-Holy Land experiences, Part 1 of 2 From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2004 20:11:27 -0600   A series of near-Holy Land experiences   Part 1 of 2 (largely unorganic; Part 2 deals with the recital)     We're home, and I'm tired. Traveling with one's spouse can be downright stressful. I can go off on a trip alone, with friends or complete strangers, live on hotdogs or prime rib, drink all night or not at all, and make it on four or five hours' sleep (or less, depending on the bed) and non-stop activities for several days (4-5) running before crashing, even in my middle-aged state. However, when it comes to packing and planning and itineraries and meals and activities for Rick and myself, it becomes enervating. And not because he is so active - quite the opposite. Because of his reduced health and more sedentary lifestyle I have to be careful not to tax him, a schedule which should keep from overtaxing me as well. For some reason it does not work out that way.   Anyway, because of court schedules this coming week I could not make it to Sarasota to hear Gerre Hancock dedicate the new Nichols and Simpson there. But in perusing my periodicals I discovered that Cameron Carpenter was going to be in Jacksonville the preceding weekend. I thrashed about for traveling companions - one friend threw me over and elected a trip to Manhattan instead - go figure. Another was reticent about either being seen in public with me, or being a passenger in the car while I'm driving - I'm not sure which. I know better than to drag non-organophiles across the state to hear an organ recital - been there, done that, have the shredded T-shirt and scars.   Suddenly I thought about my husband Rick. Surely that consummated marriage license means he has to accompany me every millenium or so on obligatory trips, doesn't it? The Florida Statutes are silent on this issue, but I did find out more about the current adultery laws. I knew I had to entice him - with what?   We've done the Disney-Epcot whirlwinds before, so had no interest in Sea World, Universal, MGM, Wet -n- Wild, Dolly Parton's Dixie Stampede, and a host of other Orlando activities. And if you don't believe the area's number one industry is tourism, have I got some real estate for you. However, there is this obscure little theme park of which I had never heard until some clerk of court told me about it. Rick was interested in it, along with any Harley shops along the way.   This place is called The Holy Land Experience, and boasts replicas of the Tabernacle, the Temple, a Jerusalem marketplace, a tomb, a huge model of Jerusalem, a Scriptorium with actual collections of the Scriptures from early times to the present, a cafe that sells authentic Biblical food (and cheeseburgers and hotdogs for goyim like me). There's talk of adding a Noah's Ark and I don't know what else. The whole thing can be done in a day.   So I bought tickets, planned the itinerary, packed the night before. Rick got off work from the graveyard shift at 7:00 a.m. and we pulled out at 8:00. Rick dozed when he wasn't driving from the passenger seat, and we made it in six hours' travel time to Orlando. I was going to stop in Gainesville and call Bruce Cornely, but Rick was afraid to eat anything and was anxious to make it to our hotel - my driving unnerved him as much as his lousy navigating aggravated me. I knew he didn't feel well, because we passed Harley shops in both Gainesville and Orlando without his wanting to stop.   I was starving by that time, because I had not eaten anything since the afternoon before. So we went to a mall and bought Rick a new pair of Timberlands, and found a nice seafood restaurant for dinner. Taking a native of the Gulf Coast inland to Orlando to eat seafood is like taking an authentic Italian to the Olive Garden. (Discerning readers will note that bribing a man to go somewhere he might not otherwise go gets expensive, as we shall see.)   Next day we spent touring The Holy Land Experience, and found the largest TGI Friday's in the world for dinner and refreshment - not my choice, but it was next to our hotel, and we were both tired. The ultimate Bloody Mary and the Foster's Beers were very welcome to me, and the dead cow was not bad, although no amount of alcohol could cover the fact that they couldn't cook veggies.   The next morning, Sunday, I packed us up and we headed to Jacksonville, but not by the direct route. We took I-4 to Daytona, stopped at the Daytona Harley Shop, where they were in readiness for Bike Week next week. I gave them a modicum of money for memorabilia. Rick refused to buy a new battery and trickle charger, even though we were at one of the largest Harley dealerships a week before its biggest annual event. More on this later.   We drove up A1A to St. Augustine, and I was able to view the lighthouse and the Castille de San Marcos, something I had always wanted to see. The weather was gorgeous as we snaked at a crawl through the tiny hamlets between Daytona and St. Augustine, and finally hit U.S. 1 to take us up to downtown Jacksonville.   I had mapped out the route meticulously, but didn't count on getting to the St. John's River to find the bridge closed. We hit I-95 to get across, then floundered around downtown north of the river trying to find the hotel, with all the normal routes blocked. (We found out later that they are "renovating" the roads for the Super Bowl next year.) I was so proud that I hadn't cursed in several days, but rest assured the entire string of Public Defender epithets came back effortlessly as I traversed almost every road downtown just to make it to the Omni across the street from the Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts. The valet ran up to ask if we were there for "the show" ("42d Street" was playing earlier in the afternoon), because the parking garage at the Omni was full. I told him no fairly curtly, that I was checking in, the implication being that with advance reservations at $179 per night plus parking and valet charges he'd be bumping one of those $30 ticket holders out of his parking spot.   We were immediately ushered into a posh corner suite on the tenth floor overlooking the river, exquisitely appointed in every way. Our bellboy was transferring to FSU to finish his graduate degrees in International Studies, so we discussed the law and the Seminoles. We made dinner reservations at Juliette's for after the recital.   The organic part comes in Part 2 - later.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com