PipeChat Digest #4299 - Wednesday, February 25, 2004
 
RE: Nunc Dimittis Berj Zamkochian   X-Posted
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
RE: A series of near-Holy Land experiences, Part 1 of 2
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Re: A series of near-Holy Land experiences, Part 1 of 2
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
RE: A series of near-Holy Land experiences, Part 1 of 2
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
[VERY LONG] A series of near-Holy Land Experiences, finale
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: [VERY LONG] A series of near-Holy Land Experiences, finale
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: [VERY LONG] A series of near-Holy Land Experiences, finale
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Pancake Day
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Pancake Day
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Re: Pancake Day
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
Re: Pancake Day
  by "bgsx" <bgsx52@sympatico.ca>
 

(back) Subject: RE: Nunc Dimittis Berj Zamkochian X-Posted From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2004 09:33:27 -0600   I heard Berj in person only once, but it was most memorable. It was a benefit concert, following a devastating earthquake in Armenia that claimed many thousands of victims. The site of the concert was Jordan Hall, and the room was filled with people from the affected ethnic communities as well as others like ourselves who wanted to do something meaningful to relieve suffering. The Jordan Hall organ had been silent for years, so it was intriguing to consider what Berj might have in store for the audience. It turned out to be a stirring evening of traditional hymns, folksongs, and organ repertoire that perfectly captured the somber yet courageous mood of the evening. The singing was strong and heartfelt. We were greatly moved. Oh, and the Baldwin substitute organ brought in for the concert completely disappeared from consideration for those hours. It was a medium for Berj, and the only message was music. This was an occasion where the artist had a perfect connection to the event and the audience. I suspect that for Berj, that was a standard that he attained with regularity.   Peter Storandt Oklahoma City   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Charlie Jack Sent: Monday, February 23, 2004 8:03 PM To: piporg-l@Listserv.albany.edu; PipeChat@PipeChat.ORG Subject: Nunc Dimittis Berj Zamkochian X-Posted   It is my sad duty to report that my good friend, concert organist Berj Zamkochian died today February 23, 2004 after a short illness. For those who may be interested, the details of his wake and funeral are below. I will post a more complete obituary tomorrow. Also, I will shortly have a web site up and running that will chronicle his life at http://home.comcast.net/~GomidasOrgan. The site will allow you to leave stories, anectotes and general rememberances of Berj as well as reflect on his life and accomplishments.   Charlie Jack Charlie@Jack.NET   Wake: Friday February 27 from 5:00 to 8:00 Pm at the Giragosian Funeral Home, 576 Mt. Auburn Street, Watertown Massachusetts (617)-924-0606.   Funeral Service: Saturday February 28th at Holy Cross Armenian Catholic Church, 200 Lexington Street, Belmont Massachusetts.   Expressions of sympathy may be made in his memory to the Gomidas Organ Fund, c/o Charles W. Jack at 16 Robinhood Road, Natick, MA 01760 or to the Congregazione Armena Mechitarista of Venice, Italy c/o Atty Joseph S. Carnabuci 21 Torrey Street, Brockton, MA 02301. "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org      
(back) Subject: RE: A series of near-Holy Land experiences, Part 1 of 2 From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2004 11:59:32 -0600   Love it!   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Glenda Sent: Monday, February 23, 2004 8:11 PM To: 'PipeChat' Subject: A series of near-Holy Land experiences, Part 1 of 2   A series of near-Holy Land experiences   Part 1 of 2 (largely unorganic; Part 2 deals with the recital)     We're home, and I'm tired. Traveling with one's spouse can be downright stressful. I can go off on a trip alone, with friends or complete strangers, live on hotdogs or prime rib, drink all night or not at all, and make it on four or five hours' sleep (or less, depending on the bed) and non-stop activities for several days (4-5) running before crashing, even in my middle-aged state. However, when it comes to packing and planning and itineraries and meals and activities for Rick and myself, it becomes enervating. And not because he is so active - quite the opposite. Because of his reduced health and more sedentary lifestyle I have to be careful not to tax him, a schedule which should keep from overtaxing me as well. For some reason it does not work out that way.   Anyway, because of court schedules this coming week I could not make it to Sarasota to hear Gerre Hancock dedicate the new Nichols and Simpson there. But in perusing my periodicals I discovered that Cameron Carpenter was going to be in Jacksonville the preceding weekend. I thrashed about for traveling companions - one friend threw me over and elected a trip to Manhattan instead - go figure. Another was reticent about either being seen in public with me, or being a passenger in the car while I'm driving - I'm not sure which. I know better than to drag non-organophiles across the state to hear an organ recital - been there, done that, have the shredded T-shirt and scars.   Suddenly I thought about my husband Rick. Surely that consummated marriage license means he has to accompany me every millenium or so on obligatory trips, doesn't it? The Florida Statutes are silent on this issue, but I did find out more about the current adultery laws. I knew I had to entice him - with what?   We've done the Disney-Epcot whirlwinds before, so had no interest in Sea World, Universal, MGM, Wet -n- Wild, Dolly Parton's Dixie Stampede, and a host of other Orlando activities. And if you don't believe the area's number one industry is tourism, have I got some real estate for you. However, there is this obscure little theme park of which I had never heard until some clerk of court told me about it. Rick was interested in it, along with any Harley shops along the way. =20   This place is called The Holy Land Experience, and boasts replicas of the Tabernacle, the Temple, a Jerusalem marketplace, a tomb, a huge model of Jerusalem, a Scriptorium with actual collections of the Scriptures from early times to the present, a cafe that sells authentic Biblical food (and cheeseburgers and hotdogs for goyim like me). There's talk of adding a Noah's Ark and I don't know what else. The whole thing can be done in a day.   So I bought tickets, planned the itinerary, packed the night before. Rick got off work from the graveyard shift at 7:00 a.m. and we pulled out at 8:00. Rick dozed when he wasn't driving from the passenger seat, and we made it in six hours' travel time to Orlando. I was going to stop in Gainesville and call Bruce Cornely, but Rick was afraid to eat anything and was anxious to make it to our hotel - my driving unnerved him as much as his lousy navigating aggravated me. I knew he didn't feel well, because we passed Harley shops in both Gainesville and Orlando without his wanting to stop.   I was starving by that time, because I had not eaten anything since the afternoon before. So we went to a mall and bought Rick a new pair of Timberlands, and found a nice seafood restaurant for dinner. Taking a native of the Gulf Coast inland to Orlando to eat seafood is like taking an authentic Italian to the Olive Garden. (Discerning readers will note that bribing a man to go somewhere he might not otherwise go gets expensive, as we shall see.)   Next day we spent touring The Holy Land Experience, and found the largest TGI Friday's in the world for dinner and refreshment - not my choice, but it was next to our hotel, and we were both tired. The ultimate Bloody Mary and the Foster's Beers were very welcome to me, and the dead cow was not bad, although no amount of alcohol could cover the fact that they couldn't cook veggies.   The next morning, Sunday, I packed us up and we headed to Jacksonville, but not by the direct route. We took I-4 to Daytona, stopped at the Daytona Harley Shop, where they were in readiness for Bike Week next week. I gave them a modicum of money for memorabilia. Rick refused to buy a new battery and trickle charger, even though we were at one of the largest Harley dealerships a week before its biggest annual event. More on this later.   We drove up A1A to St. Augustine, and I was able to view the lighthouse and the Castille de San Marcos, something I had always wanted to see. The weather was gorgeous as we snaked at a crawl through the tiny hamlets between Daytona and St. Augustine, and finally hit U.S. 1 to take us up to downtown Jacksonville.   I had mapped out the route meticulously, but didn't count on getting to the St. John's River to find the bridge closed. We hit I-95 to get across, then floundered around downtown north of the river trying to find the hotel, with all the normal routes blocked. (We found out later that they are "renovating" the roads for the Super Bowl next year.) I was so proud that I hadn't cursed in several days, but rest assured the entire string of Public Defender epithets came back effortlessly as I traversed almost every road downtown just to make it to the Omni across the street from the Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts. =20 The valet ran up to ask if we were there for "the show" ("42d Street" was playing earlier in the afternoon), because the parking garage at the Omni was full. I told him no fairly curtly, that I was checking in, the implication being that with advance reservations at $179 per night plus parking and valet charges he'd be bumping one of those $30 ticket holders out of his parking spot.   We were immediately ushered into a posh corner suite on the tenth floor overlooking the river, exquisitely appointed in every way. Our bellboy was transferring to FSU to finish his graduate degrees in International Studies, so we discussed the law and the Seminoles. We made dinner reservations at Juliette's for after the recital.   The organic part comes in Part 2 - later.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com         "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org      
(back) Subject: Re: A series of near-Holy Land experiences, Part 1 of 2 From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2004 13:51:03 -0600   Glenda wrote:   > We're home, and I'm tired. Traveling with one's spouse can be > downright > stressful. I can go off on a trip alone, with friends or complete > strangers, <snip> > when it comes to packing and planning and itineraries and meals and > = activities for Rick and myself, it becomes enervating.   Gosh, that sounds SO sad to me. I so thoroughly enjoy traveling with my spouse and would prefer her company to virtually ANYone else. I guess in my case, I have purely selfish motives; a back-handed way of saying to myself: "I've got to improve my image. I need to be seen WITH my wife!" Most folks would MUCH rather talk to HER than to me. In fact: I would = tend to avoid ALL people at ALL costs were it not for her insistence on some company once in awhile!   Must come with the solitary, hermitoid existence that organbuilders tend = to lead.   Faithfully,   G.A.   -- Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO <>< Schneider Pipe Organs, Inc. 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (877) 944-2454 TOLL-FREE (217) 944-2527 FAX arpschneider@starband.net Home Office EMAIL arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com URL ADDRESS  
(back) Subject: RE: A series of near-Holy Land experiences, Part 1 of 2 From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2004 16:47:21 -0600   Does she do all the packing, planning, reservations and driving? Does she have to make you be sociable and get out? Does she bribe you to get you to do what she wants? Do you ever take her out dancing or something she really likes to do without her asking or begging? Then maybe we should be asking her. Just an idea from one who has handled a lot of divorces in the deep South and knows the traditional male mind.   Cheers,   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Richard Schneider Sent: Tuesday, February 24, 2004 1:51 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: A series of near-Holy Land experiences, Part 1 of 2   Gosh, that sounds SO sad to me. I so thoroughly enjoy traveling with my spouse and would prefer her company to virtually ANYone else. I guess in my case, I have purely selfish motives; a back-handed way of saying to myself: "I've got to improve my image. I need to be seen WITH my wife!" Most folks would MUCH rather talk to HER than to me. In fact: I would tend to avoid ALL people at ALL costs were it not for her insistence on some company once in awhile!        
(back) Subject: [VERY LONG] A series of near-Holy Land Experiences, finale From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2004 17:45:05 -0600   A series of near-Holy Land Experiences   Part 2 of 2   I begin with apologies to Grandpa Arp for the earlier e-mail. It's been a litigious day at work, and I must have brought it home. Got shafted by the local McDonalds on the way, and have been obsessing over two days of depositions still to come this week and next week's court schedule, so I had no business opening the e-mail and firing off marital advice while I was still battering the world.   Finally I am getting around to the recital. The term that most closely describes Cameron Carpenter is that he is a 'character'. His publicity photo for his recital and CD depicted a guy badly in need of a hairdresser, and from the innuendo and rumors of gossip about him I expected him to walk out in an orange silk jumpsuit and cape. So when he came out in curly hair, tied-dyed denims and a black shirt, I was relieved. He was brash, bold and confident, as well as talented. No program of the music was provided; he announced his selections. In fact, he talked a lot, providing a continuing apologia for his style of playing. Everything was played from memory. The room was approximately one-half full, very gratifying for a ticketed organ event.   The program given to the recital goers told nothing of the hall or organ. Jacoby Symphony Hall is one of two halls at the Times-Union Center, and seats 1800 people, I believe. The website does not discuss the organ, but Jonathan Ambrosino's site does give a blurb:   http://homepage.mac.com/glarehead/ambrosino/p-jacksonville-jacoby.html   I'm sure somewhere there exists a stoplist. I thought I had one, but if so it is momentarily safe. The program:   Prelude #20 from the Well Tempered Clavier - J.S. Bach Wedge Prelude and Fugue - Bach Colonial Psalm - Percy Grainger March of the Paladin - Nikolai Medtner One of Rachmaninoff's Etudes-Tableaux - didn't catch the number Perpetual Motion - Middleschulte   Intermission   P&F in D major - Bach Esquisse in E-minor - Dupre Improvisation in 3 movements based on the poems: I - fragment from Mephistopheles' soliloquy in the first act of 'Faust' by Goethe II - 'Choose Something like a Star' - Robert Frost III - 'The Tiger' - William Blake   Encore - improvisation on The Star-Spangled Banner   The recital began in complete darkness with the prelude on a simple 8' flute stop. I thought this quite entertaining, particularly after watching all the people jockeying for primo seats to "see" the performer prior to the recital (we're talking general admission seating). Rick and I chose the middle of the room, because we were more interested in hearing what the organ would do.   Then Cameron went directly into the Wedge, the lights coming up. As I said, he was wearing tied-dyed jeans and a black shirt open at the neck, with a neck tie tied around his neck. He looked a bit like a cross between Glenn Gould and Johnny Depp, but if he's going to cop the look, I advise him to go with the "Pirates of the Caribbean" Johnny - long curly black hair and heavy eyeliner around the eyes. That was the sexiest Depp has ever gotten. Anyway, to complete his ensemble, he had on what looked like gold Organmasters with a built-up heel, and Nascar racing flag checkered socks.   I'm going to say some nice things, but just not here, so bear with me. I didn't care for the Bach. I had heard reams and reams about the wonderful acoustics of this organ and room, and I honestly believe Carpenter just played too fast - what I mean is that his speed worked against the reverberance of the room. As a result, the registration at full organ sounded muddy in both Bach organic selections. His playing was punctuated by unevenness of rhythm and awkward pauses, along with some strange dynamics. These tactics, chosen deliberately by him as part of his individualistic style in his crusade to save the organ from extinction, were quite effective in the non-Bach pieces. He did some really neat echoing in spots of the fugue. The hiccups were just very distracting.   There was applause between the prelude and fugue, and he quickly jumped off the bench to take a bow, then jumped back on and started the fugue.   Carpenter related that Grainger wrote the Colonial Psalm for his mother. It was an interesting piece, although the constantly rocking of the swell pedal was again distracting. He made liberal and good use of the various colors of the instrument, and exhibited his adeptness at thumbing down and constantly seemless modification of registration.   I think the Medtner was my favorite piece of the evening. Medtner was a contemporary of Rachmaninoff. I think that Cameron stated this was a piano piece, but it was so colorful and virtuosic it was hard to imagine it so. He used the right hand and pedals, leaving the left hand free a large part of the time to change registrations. The Rachmaninoff followed, again a mastery in right hand and pedal. He is supremely agile with his feet - Rick said that Carpenter was the best on pedals he had seen thus far, and I tend to agree. He confirmed his facility with feet in the Middleschulte, playing it as well as I have heard it.   During intermission, CDs were on sale. I debated whether to buy one, but Rick marched me back up the aisle and we purchased the next to last one available. The title is apparently "Turn this up really loud; Organs: 2; Cameron Carpenter: 1". The CD is homemade, part of the tracks recorded on a "huge" Allen custom digital at St. Michael the Archangel, Cary, North Carolina, and part in live performance at the 5-manual Austin at Merrill Auditorium, Portland, Maine. According to the inside jacket, the CD is only available at his recitals.   During the second half, Cameron appeared in dark blue jeans and black leather jacket, same socks and shoes. Again the Bach suffered because the speed of sound just couldn't keep up, but the pedals were the crispest thing about his playing. I must note here that on his recording he did the Dorian P&F and actually slowed down the fugue. It was quite crispy and sans any drop of romanticism, so I know he can do it any way he chooses.   The Dupre was again very fast and virtuosic, Carpenter being very sure of himself.   Before the recital the attendees were given a sheet of paper with copies of the poems forming the basis for his improvisation. At this point in the recital Cameron read each poem then composed the movement. The first movement was shades of the Sorceror's Apprentice, but probably the best of the three movements. The Frost was a Berlin Brothers goes to Disney fantasia, well done. The third movement started very impressively, his pounding on the bass notes to emulate the jungle and roar.   After four curtain calls, he came back and did a rendition of the Star-Spangled Banner with improvisation.   After listening to the CD a couple times and contemplating (apparently before the battles of the day today), I concluded that Cameron is probably wasting his energies recording/performing the entire organ works of Bach. I don't think he will be successful in reinventing the wheel of how we perceive Bach's organ music. However, he has the capacity of making Reger and Sowerby entertaining and palatable to the lay world, and should probably attempt to record their entire organ works for posterity. He apparently really loves improvisation, and is good at it.   I also began thinking about just how one revives a more general interest in the organ as a medium. Perhaps Eisner and Disney need to turn their ideas to the orchestral, percussive and other aural capabilities of the organ in the movie-making field. Or maybe I just breathed the air from Universal Studios a little too long this weekend.   Anyway, we made it back across the street and to our room, where Rick turned the television to some show with an incredibly improbable story about a plane over the Indian Ocean losing all four engines in a St. Elmo's Fire display. The story got bigger and better, and we started laughing hysterically. Rather than stay for the finale, we made it to the restaurant for steak and pork tenderloin.   The next morning dawned bright and fair, and we packed as Monday rush hour prevailed outside. Then we leisurely took our leave. However, the trip was not over, for Rick had decided that he must stop at the Harley shop in Tallahassee on the way home for the battery and trickle charger about which he had demurred in Daytona. When we stopped for lunch, I perused a telephone book to remind myself where the store was. Then we took off on a 13-mile wild-goose chase hunting the elusive motorcycle shop. What we didn't know and the billboard and telephone book didn't tell us was that the owners had built a new store, which was nestled in the woods next to the interstate exit we had just taken - no signs. Just before giving up we found it, so that Rick could make his purchases. Thankfully I did not let loose any invective about the asinine failure to advertise the location of their remote site.   It was really nice to make it home, unpack and put clothes on to wash, and kiss all the babies. Rick survived the trip and is still alive and well, thanks be to God, despite my driving. I managed to avoid slitting his throat with a nail file as he gave me inaccurate driving directions. Again I have resolved to keep all plumbing tools and maps out of Rick's hands, for the sake of the mental health of our happy Christmas family. No wildlife was killed in the making of this trip, only a couple brain cells. Back to work we go tomorrow.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Re: [VERY LONG] A series of near-Holy Land Experiences, finale From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2004 17:59:10 -0600   At 5:45 PM -0600 02/24/04, Glenda wrote: > >I'm sure somewhere there exists a stoplist. I thought I had one, but if >so it is momentarily safe.   The stoplist can be found on the Quimby Web Site - http://www.quimbypipeorgans.com/jacoby.htm   David  
(back) Subject: Re: [VERY LONG] A series of near-Holy Land Experiences, finale From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2004 20:36:12 -0500   On 2/24/04 6:45 PM, "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> wrote:   > Back to work we go tomorrow.   Glenda, you cannot IMAGINE the pleasure with which your travelogs/reviews are read here.   Thanks so MUCH!   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Pancake Day From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2004 19:39:59 -0600     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> To: "Pipechat-L" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, February 24, 2004 12:44 AM Subject: Pancake Day     > Don't forget that today (Shrove Tuesday) is Pancake Day. Whether you = like > them in the English manner with lemon and sugar drizzled over them. Crepes > "Canadienne", with maple syrup on top, or in the true French style with = a > savoury stuffing inside them   Our church, St. Mark's Episcopal in St. Louis, had a pancake supper (I = think with maple syrup) this evening to celebrate Shrove Tuesday. Being away working in Warrensburg during the week, I unfortunately missed it, but = made my own pancakes (with lemon and sugar, Englishman that I am) for supper. = I was surprised on discussing this with some friends here, however, to discover that (a) in west central Missouri the term used is "Fat Tuesday" (Mardi Gras) and the term "Shrove Tuesday" is apparently unheard of. (b) there seems to be no tradition in west central Missouri of eating pancakes on Fat Tuesday.   By the way, if there are any on the list who haven't heard of Shrove Tuesday, it is the day when you went to church to get your sins "shriven" = or forgiven before commencing Lent. There is an English surname, "Shriver" which means "Pardoner" as in Chaucer's "Canterbury Tales."   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: Pancake Day From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2004 00:09:47 -0500   Well, that's it for another year, - Pancake Day has come and gone!   We had our usual half dozen or so each this evening, - my wife decided to make them from one of her collection of Delia Smith's cookbooks. They = were as good as ever, but the English seem to have got this "thing" about Delia =   Smith, - I would have just made them using the time honoured recipe that has been handed down from the 13th century.   Actually, there were 13 to be eaten, and I took the privilege of being the =   Head of the Household and offered the spare one to the Cook, but she declined, - so I had to eat it myself!   As follows good English tradition, we had them with lemon juice and sugar, =   - none of these nasty North American habits at our dinner table!   Now you can all get back to work on your Lenten music.   Bob Conway    
(back) Subject: Re: Pancake Day From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2004 00:28:57 EST   Bob,   My "other half" and I had our pancakes here in Boston. They were not pancakes, though, but piklets. Not the crumpet kind, but the kind "in = between" that came down to us from several generations of Black Country cooks.   Needless to say, I'm giving them up for Lent! Bill H.    
(back) Subject: Re: Pancake Day From: "bgsx" <bgsx52@sympatico.ca> Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2004 00:54:36 -0500   John L. Speller wrote:   > I > was surprised on discussing this with some friends here, however, to > discover that (a) in west central Missouri the term used is "Fat = Tuesday" > (Mardi Gras) and the term "Shrove Tuesday" is apparently unheard of. = (b) > there seems to be no tradition in west central Missouri of eating = pancakes > on Fat Tuesday.   http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/christianity/holydays/shrovetuesday= .shtml   Giving up foods: but not wasting them   In the old days there were many foods that observant Christians would not eat during Lent: foods such as meat and fish, fats, eggs, and milky foods.   So that no food was wasted, families would have a feast on the shriving Tuesday, and eat up all the foods that wouldn't last the forty days of Lent without going off.   The need to eat up the fats gave rise to the French name Mardi Gras; meaning fat tuesday. Pancakes became associated with Shrove Tuesday as they were a dish that could use up all the eggs fats and milk in the house with just the addition of flour.