PipeChat Digest #4301 - Wednesday, February 25, 2004
 
Re: Pancake Day
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: FW: musicians
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
Pie Jesu
  by "Robert Nickel" <rnickel@charter.net>
OHS Tour of Dutch Organs, Aug 15-23
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
Re: Pancake Day
  by "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net>
One If By Land, And Two If By Sea (grin)
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Lancashire Marshall Organ Company
  by "Jeremy T. Mills" <jt4118@pa.net>
Re: Lancashire Marshall Organ Company
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
RE: Lancashire Marshall Organ Company
  by "john volbeda" <johnvolbeda@hotmail.com>
Re: Lancashire Marshall Organ Company
  by "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
Re: Lancashire Marshall Organ Company
  by "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
Searching Your Organ's Histroy
  by "Jeremy T. Mills" <jt4118@pa.net>
RE: One If By Land, And Two If By Sea (grin)
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
RE: FW: musicians
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
RE: [VERY LONG] A series of near-Holy Land Experiences, finale
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: One If By Land, And Two If By Sea (grin)
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Pancake Day From: "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2004 10:06:52 +0000 (GMT)   Here in Greece we mark the beginning of lent by having what is called "Katharo Deftera". or Clean Monday. Special bread called "Lagana" is baked on this day. It is similar in spirit to Shrove Tuesday, being an occasion to eat up all the foods not permitted during Lent. Many Greeks still keep to the traditional fasting, though it is less prevalent amongst the young. Carnival processions are held throughout the country at the weekend - the younger children all dress up in a style akin to Halloween. On Monday they fly kites and let off fireworks to drive off evil spirits and let those trapped escape. Food tastes much better when you are hungry, and also after a period of abstinence - and the Lenten tradition has long established roots. Many Greek religious customs are adaptations of those already existing when St Paul came here to spread the Gospel and give advice to the citizens of Thessalonika and Corinth. John Foss     =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D www.johnfoss.gr http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/ Topics of the week : UK by far the highest violent crime rate in Europe Minority Rights Jokes to offend everyone     ___________________________________________________________ Yahoo! Messenger - Communicate instantly..."Ping" your friends today! Download Messenger Now http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/download/index.html  
(back) Subject: Re: FW: musicians From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2004 09:53:02 EST   Many thanks to Mr. Turnbull of the BBC for this rather interesting = article!   It seems to me that the "importation" of British organists to fill = important US posts has been a hot topic on this list as has been the more recent = topic of the closing of some venerable US organ and sacred music programs.   This may spark controversy, but why not hire Brits? As an American I = consider the National Cathedral a national treasure. As an Anglican, I'm proud that =   what we call our "National" Cathedral is associated with the Episcopal = church. However, the Episcopal church is associated with the Anglican Communion, = which includes (in fact, was created by) the Church of England. Why shouldn't a qualified English sacred musician be employed at an Episcopal/Anglican = cathedral in Washington--or in Sydney, or Durban, or anywhere else? If British = churches paid the kind of wages common in the United States, I know for a fact that =   there are some Anglican musicians in the US who would consider working in = the UK--although they would have to give up the luxury of having congregations =   present on Sunday mornings.   I suspect that the willingness of British organists to work in the US says =   more good than bad about American Anglicanism and American candidates for certain key Anglican organ jobs. For all the university organ department = closings and the continued 19th century trend in the US that results in tasteless = and charismatic Benny Hinn Christianity, we're still producing outstanding = musicians at an unprecedented rate. While some departments are closing, today's = American Sacred Musicians are well schooled in the art of musicianship. What's = missing is jobs. Not because we're hiring Brits for "important" jobs, but because = we have allowed church to be defined by bad taste and that supremely American =   (meaning US) misunderstanding of republican democracy as a license for mob = rule and anti-intellectualism.   Some food for thought and comment, Bill H. St. John's Bowdoin St., Boston.          
(back) Subject: Pie Jesu From: "Robert Nickel" <rnickel@charter.net> Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2004 08:55:35 -0600   Sorry for the non-pipe organ post. Does anyone know if Webber's "Pie = Jesu" is available as a piano-organ duet? If so, could you point me in the = right direction. (Feel free to reply privately, please.) Thanks.   Bob Nickel      
(back) Subject: OHS Tour of Dutch Organs, Aug 15-23 From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2004 10:23:37 -0500   Here is a list of the organs that OHS will visit on its tour of organs in The Netherlands, August 15-23. Cost, $1,650 per person. Registration information at http://www.organsociety.org and from EuroTour@organsociety.org   ITINERARY FOR OHS TOUR TO THE NETHERLANDS, 2004 January 27, 2004, Revised Version   Sun. August 15, 2004 Participants meet at hotel in Nijmegen (1.5 hours by direct train from Amsterdam Central Station) Overnight in Nijmegen   Mon. August 16 Nijmegen, Grote- of Sint Stevenskerk - 1776 Ludwig K=F6nig organ. 1670 an= on. choir organ. 's-Hertogenbosch, Sint-Janskathedraal - 1787 A. F. G. Heyneman organ. Oirschot, Sint Petrus' Bandenkerk - 1846 Franciscus Cornelis Smits organ Helmond, Sint Lambertuskerk - 1770 Guillaume Robustelly organ Overnight in Nijmegen   Tue. August 17 Arnhem, Grote- of Eusebiuskerk - 1796 Johannes Str=FCmphler organ Doesburg, Grote- of Martinikerk - 1916 E. F. Walcker & Cie organ Zutphen, Grote- of Sint Walburgskerk - 1637 Hans Heinrich Bader organ Overnight in Zwolle   Wed. August 18 Zwolle, Grote- of Sint Michaelskerk - 1721 J. J. Schnitger & F. C. Schnit= ger organ. Kampen, Boven- of Sint Nicolaaskerk - 1676 Jan Slegel/1743 A. A. Hinsz organ. 1999 Gebr. Reil choir organ free time in Zwolle Overnight in Zwolle   Thurs. August 19 Elburg, Grote- of Sint Nicolaaskerk - 1825 Georg Heinrich Quellhorst orga= n Harderwijk, Grote- of Onze Lieve Vrouwekerk - 1826 Gebr. B=E4tz organ Amersfoort, Herv. Emmakerk - 1875 Henry Willis organ (from Blackburn, England) Overnight in Utrecht   Fri. August 20 Utrecht, Domkerk - 1831 B=E4tz organ Utrecht, Jacobikerk - 1742 Rudolf Garrels/1823 Abraham Meere organ Utrecht, Museum of Mechanical Musical Instruments free time in Utrecht Overnight in Utrecht   Sat. August 21 Gouda, Grote- of Sint Janskerk - 1736 Jean-Fran=E7ois Moreau organ Leiden, Grote- of St. Pieterskerk - 1643 Germer Galtussen and Jacobus van Hagerbeer organ Leiden, Hooglandse- of Pancraskerk - 1565 Pieter Jansz de Swart/1637 Van Hagerbeer organ Overnight in Amsterdam   Sun. August 22 Haarlem, Grote- of Sint Bavokerk - 1738 Christian M=FCller organ Alkmaar, Grote- of St. Laurenskerk - 1646 Galtus van Hagerbeer/1725 Frans Caspar Schnitger organ Medemblick, Bonifaciuskerk - 1671 Pieter Backer organ Oosthuizen, Hervormde Kerk - 1521 late Gothic organ Purmerend, St. Nicolaaskerk - 1742 Garrels organ. 1866 Witte choir organ. Overnight in Amsterdam   Mon. August 23 Amsterdam: Westerkerk - 1685 Roelof Barend Duyschot/1726 Christian Vater organ Amsterdam, Sint Nicolaaskerk - 1889 Wilhelm Sauer organ Naarden, Grote- of Sint Vituskerk- 1863 C. G. F. Witte organ. 1937 H. W. Flentrop choir organ. Overnight in Amsterdam End of tour      
(back) Subject: Re: Pancake Day From: "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net> Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2004 12:34:25 -0500       On 25 Feb 2004 at 0:54, bgsx wrote:   > Pancakes became associated with Shrove Tuesday as > they were a dish that could use up all the eggs fats and milk in the > house with just the addition of flour.     And then there's the German tradition of Fastnacht! Doughnuts!   --Shirley      
(back) Subject: One If By Land, And Two If By Sea (grin) From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2004 11:18:58 -0800       DERREINETOR@aol.com wrote: > Many thanks to Mr. Turnbull of the BBC for this rather interesting = article! > > It seems to me that the "importation" of British organists to fill > important US posts has been a hot topic on this list as has been the > more recent topic of the closing of some venerable US organ and sacred > music programs. > > This may spark controversy, but why not hire Brits? As an American I > consider the National Cathedral a national treasure. As an Anglican, I'm =   > proud that what we call our "National" Cathedral is associated with the > Episcopal church. However, the Episcopal church is associated with the > Anglican Communion, which includes (in fact, was created by) the Church > of England.   (snip)   > > Some food for thought and comment, > Bill H. > St. John's Bowdoin St., Boston.   Given your signature, I can't let THAT bit of mis-information pass (chuckle) ... Titcomb must be SPINNING (grin).   The American Episcopal Church was NOT "created by the Church of England".   Far from it.   When the General Convention elected Samuel Seabury to be America's first bishop, they sent him to London to be consecrated, KNOWING that the Bishop of London would refuse, as an oath of allegiance to the British Crown was required, and we'd just won the Revolutionary War.   Seabury then betook himself to the Scottish Episcopal Nonjurors, who required no such oath. He was consecrated, in return for promising to present the much more catholic and orthodox SCOTTISH Prayer Book to General Convention, rather than the hodge-podge much-tinkered-with English 1662 Book.   This he did; General Convention accepted it. If you go to   http://justus.anglican.org/resources/bcp/index.html   you can have a look at ALL the Prayer Books from 1549 to 1979.   It remained for the 1979 Book to cast aside centuries of orthodox teaching, but that's another subject (grin).   This has relevance to the present controversy wracking the Anglican Communion, in that it was NOT required to be in communion with the Church of England OR the Archbishop of Canterbury in the 1700s in order to be considered a "valid" Anglican.   The Scottish Episcopal Church had existed since the Reformation without any such "validation." And indeed it was some years before the C of E recognized the American Episcopal Church, which obviously was political, rathern than doctrinal.   In fact, I'm not CERTAIN that ANY C of E bishops took part in ANY American consecrations of bishops until relatively recently. Our Apostolic Succession is from Scotland (and more recently the Old Catholics and the Swedish Lutherans), NOT from the Church of England.   Cheers,   Bud            
(back) Subject: Lancashire Marshall Organ Company From: "Jeremy T. Mills" <jt4118@pa.net> Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2004 15:12:25 -0800   Hi,=20 My name is Jeremy Mills and I am the Organist at Rouzerville United = Methodist Church in southern PA. We have a Lancashire Marshall Organ = Company mechanical action organ. Does anyone have any information or = know where I can get information about Lancashire Marshall Organ = Company.   Thanks Jeremy Mills    
(back) Subject: Re: Lancashire Marshall Organ Company From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2004 15:42:29 -0500   Jeremy,   I looked it up in a Google Search, and there are three entries all about = it on the first page alone.   Good Luck,   Bob Conway   At 06:12 PM 2/25/2004, you wrote: >Hi, >My name is Jeremy Mills and I am the Organist at Rouzerville United >Methodist Church in southern PA. We have a Lancashire Marshall Organ >Company mechanical action organ. Does anyone have any information or = know >where I can get information about Lancashire Marshall Organ Company. > >Thanks >Jeremy Mills      
(back) Subject: RE: Lancashire Marshall Organ Company From: "john volbeda" <johnvolbeda@hotmail.com> Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2004 12:44:32 -0800   From the PipeChat Archives.... and thanks to Google:   It all began when Englishman Octavius Marshall was involved in the purchase of a London built Lewis organ for the Episcopal Church in Ripon, Wisconsin in 1860. He and his brothers set up an organ firm Marshall Bros. in Ripon (later Marshall & Odenbrett of Ripon, Marshall Bros. of Milwaukee, Marshall Bros. & Clarke, etc., etc.), and recruited several other Englishmen including John F. Lancashire and John Turner. These two later left and set up their own firm in Moline, Illinois, called Lancashire & Turner, which in 1879 became the Moline Organ Co., one of the finest midwestern builders of the nineteenth century and heavily influenced by the finer British firms. In 1891 Octavius Marshall went into partnership with his former employee John Lancashire and reorganized the Moline Organ Co. as the Lancashire-Marshall Organ Co. of Moline, Illinois.   Robert J. Bennett alias Benoit enters the picture in the 1890s. There is some doubt as to whether he was born in Paris, Maine or Paris, France, but he seems to have been related to the Lahaise family who worked for Hook & Hastings and now have their own organ firm in Boston. Having trained with Hook & Hastings, Bennett became the manager of the pipe organ division of Lyon & Healey of Chicago, who in those days made organs as well as harps. There seems to have been some connection between Lyon & Healy and the Los Angeles Art Organ Co. (builders of the Wanamakers organ), but precisely what this was still remains to be fathomed. John Lancashire died at the turn of the century and in 1902 Bennett became the partner of Octavius Marshall and the Lancashire-Marshall Organ Co. reorganized as the Marshall-Bennett Organ Co. of Rock Island, Illinois. In fact the premises had not moved from Moline, and were in the same place as before, but meanwhile the Moline/Rock Island municipal boundary had moved and the firm therefore found itself in a different city.   Mr. Marshall left the firm in 1908 and after running his own firm in Kansas City for a while later ended up as an Austin representative. Meanwhile the Rock Island firm reorganized as the Bennett Organ Company, which operated under that name from 1908-1927, before reorganizing as the Rock Island Organ Co. in 1927 and finally going to the wall in 1930.   [Many of these details are taken from David Fox's book on North American organbuilders, published by the OHS. I also wrote an article on the Moline Organ Co. in the English periodical The Organ back about ten years ago, while Richard Weber of Milwaukee has been doing a lot of excellent research and written several articles on the Marshall connection.]   John Speller St. Louis, Mo.         >Hi, >My name is Jeremy Mills and I am the Organist at Rouzerville United >Methodist Church in southern PA. We have a Lancashire Marshall Organ >Company mechanical action organ. Does anyone have any information or = know >where I can get information about Lancashire Marshall Organ Company. > >Thanks >Jeremy Mills   _________________________________________________________________ Say =93good-bye=94 to spam, viruses and pop-ups with MSN Premium -- free = trial offer! http://click.atdmt.com/AVE/go/onm00200359ave/direct/01/    
(back) Subject: Re: Lancashire Marshall Organ Company From: "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2004 15:56:45 -0500   Jeremy:   I don't know how this one slipped by me.   Back in the 60's and 70's I catalogued hundreds of old trackers in our native central PA.   I am intrigued by the presence of an L-M here in PA. There is a Moline near Williamsport. These are the only mid-western built organs anywhere around here.   Can you fill in details about the organ, and when it was installed?   If I have time later, I can fill you in on L-M, but I am sure someone else will step up to the plate before then.   Jim McFarland Millersville (Lancaster) PA       On Wed, 25 Feb 2004 15:12:25 -0800 "Jeremy T. Mills" <jt4118@pa.net> writes: Hi, My name is Jeremy Mills and I am the Organist at Rouzerville United Methodist Church in southern PA. We have a Lancashire Marshall Organ Company mechanical action organ. Does anyone have any information or know where I can get information about Lancashire Marshall Organ Company.   Thanks Jeremy Mills  
(back) Subject: Re: Lancashire Marshall Organ Company From: "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2004 15:58:29 -0500       JEREMY:   SEE! I told you someone would beat me to it!   Jim McFarland       On Wed, 25 Feb 2004 12:44:32 -0800 "john volbeda" <johnvolbeda@hotmail.com> writes: > From the PipeChat Archives.... and thanks to Google: > > It all began when Englishman Octavius Marshall was involved in the > purchase of a London built Lewis organ for the Episcopal Church in > Ripon, Wisconsin in 1860. He and his brothers set up an organ firm > Marshall Bros. in Ripon (later Marshall & Odenbrett of Ripon, > Marshall > Bros. of Milwaukee, Marshall Bros. & Clarke, etc., etc.), and > recruited > several other Englishmen including John F. Lancashire and John > Turner. > These two later left and set up their own firm in Moline, Illinois, > called Lancashire & Turner, which in 1879 became the Moline Organ > Co., > one of the finest midwestern builders of the nineteenth century and > heavily influenced by the finer British firms. In 1891 Octavius > Marshall went into partnership with his former employee John > Lancashire > and reorganized the Moline Organ Co. as the Lancashire-Marshall > Organ > Co. of Moline, Illinois. > > Robert J. Bennett alias Benoit enters the picture in the 1890s. > There > is some doubt as to whether he was born in Paris, Maine or Paris, > France, but he seems to have been related to the Lahaise family who > worked for Hook & Hastings and now have their own organ firm in > Boston. > Having trained with Hook & Hastings, Bennett became the manager of > the > pipe organ division of Lyon & Healey of Chicago, who in those days > made > organs as well as harps. There seems to have been some connection > between Lyon & Healy and the Los Angeles Art Organ Co. (builders of > the > Wanamakers organ), but precisely what this was still remains to be > fathomed. John Lancashire died at the turn of the century and in > 1902 > Bennett became the partner of Octavius Marshall and the > Lancashire-Marshall Organ Co. reorganized as the Marshall-Bennett > Organ > Co. of Rock Island, Illinois. In fact the premises had not moved > from > Moline, and were in the same place as before, but meanwhile the > Moline/Rock Island municipal boundary had moved and the firm > therefore > found itself in a different city. > > Mr. Marshall left the firm in 1908 and after running his own firm > in > Kansas City for a while later ended up as an Austin representative. > Meanwhile the Rock Island firm reorganized as the Bennett Organ > Company, > which operated under that name from 1908-1927, before reorganizing > as > the Rock Island Organ Co. in 1927 and finally going to the wall in > 1930. > > [Many of these details are taken from David Fox's book on North > American > organbuilders, published by the OHS. I also wrote an article on > the > Moline Organ Co. in the English periodical The Organ back about ten > years ago, while Richard Weber of Milwaukee has been doing a lot of > excellent research and written several articles on the Marshall > connection.] > > John Speller > St. Louis, Mo. > > > > > >Hi, > >My name is Jeremy Mills and I am the Organist at Rouzerville United > > >Methodist Church in southern PA. We have a Lancashire Marshall > Organ > >Company mechanical action organ. Does anyone have any information > or know > >where I can get information about Lancashire Marshall Organ > Company. > > > >Thanks > >Jeremy Mills > > _________________________________________________________________ > Say =93good-bye=94 to spam, viruses and pop-ups with MSN Premium -- free =   > trial > offer! http://click.atdmt.com/AVE/go/onm00200359ave/direct/01/ > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related > topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > >  
(back) Subject: Searching Your Organ's Histroy From: "Jeremy T. Mills" <jt4118@pa.net> Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2004 16:07:36 -0800   Thanks for the response that I have recieved about the Lancashire = Marshall Organ Company. Does anyone have any ideas of how to research = your Organ's history. All I know is that the Lancashire Marshall Organ = that we have was bought from England and was installed in our church in = 1915. All the other paper work has been distroyed in a flood. I = believe that I may be entering a challenge that I will never be able to = get answers to. Thanks for any help or adive anyone can give.   Jeremy    
(back) Subject: RE: One If By Land, And Two If By Sea (grin) From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2004 16:34:33 -0500   Bud writes:   >When the General Convention elected Samuel Seabury to be America's = first=20 bishop,=20   And Seabury was not even the first Anglican bishop to serve in the New = World. He was preceded, almost a lifetime away, by John Talbot, = consecrated to the episcopacy, ALSO by the non-jurors, in 1722. He was = the first rector of Saint Mary's, Burlington, N.J. and is buried in the = churchyard there. See:=20   http://www.stmarysburlington.org/framehistory.htm (and click on the name = "John Talbot" at the bottom for a brief explanation and a picture of the = gravestone, which clearly proclaims him a bishop).   For some reason, this seems to be a little-known, if not suppressed, = fact in the history of the Episcopal Church.   >Our Apostolic Succession is from Scotland (and more recently the Old=20 Catholics and the Swedish Lutherans), NOT from the Church of England.   At some special early-evening reception or other in the living room of = St. Thomas Church, New York about ten years ago, I mentioned to Fr. = Andrew of seeing a little store-front Swedish church a few blocks away, = and then asked him whether by our reckoning the Swedish Lutherans enjoy = the Apostolic Succession and valid orders (being then unsure on that = point). I assumed that he, former chaplain to His Grace of Canterbury = and all, would know the answer immediately, but he replied only that he = *thought* they did. I continued to circulate and socialize in the room. = A few minutes later, he found me and reported that, yes, Swedish = Lutheran orders are definitely valid. He had evidently sent someone to = make inquiries and bring him back an answer ASAP, in the middle of that = social occasion. I thought it was "jolly decent" of him (as well as = indicative of the seriousness with which many of us take the subject.)    
(back) Subject: RE: FW: musicians From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2004 16:44:51 -0500   > I suspect that the willingness of British organists to work in the US = says more good than bad about American Anglicanism and American = candidates for certain key Anglican organ jobs. For all the university = organ department closings and the continued 19th century trend in the US = that results in tasteless and charismatic Benny Hinn Christianity, we're = still producing outstanding musicians at an unprecedented rate. While = some departments are closing, today's American Sacred Musicians are well = schooled in the art of musicianship. What's missing is jobs. Not because = we're hiring Brits for "important" jobs, but because we have allowed = church to be defined by bad taste and that supremely American (meaning = US) misunderstanding of republican democracy as a license for mob rule = and anti-intellectualism.=20   Well said, Bill!   As most of us know by now, Frederick Swann and others have speculated = that there are no longer enough opportunities in the U.S. for church = musicians to be trained in the finest traditions.   A colleague who is a former chorister of St. Thomas, NYC attended a = reunion of "old boys" last Sunday evening, which was also of course an = opportunity to say farewell to Gerre Hancock. He learned that the = indefatigable Hancocks will move back to his native Texas where, at the = age of 70 or very near, he/they will start a university program in = church music.   Hardly anyone alive today has done/is doing so much as he to counter = Swann's lament from coming to pass.               > -----Original Message----- > From: DERREINETOR@aol.com [SMTP:DERREINETOR@aol.com] > Sent: Wednesday, February 25, 2004 9:53 AM > To: pipechat@pipechat.org > Subject: Re: FW: musicians >=20 > Many thanks to Mr. Turnbull of the BBC for this rather interesting = article! >=20 > It seems to me that the "importation" of British organists to fill = important US posts has been a hot topic on this list as has been the = more recent topic of the closing of some venerable US organ and sacred = music programs.=20 >=20 > This may spark controversy, but why not hire Brits? As an American I = consider the National Cathedral a national treasure. As an Anglican, I'm = proud that what we call our "National" Cathedral is associated with the = Episcopal church. However, the Episcopal church is associated with the = Anglican Communion, which includes (in fact, was created by) the Church = of England. Why shouldn't a qualified English sacred musician be = employed at an Episcopal/Anglican cathedral in Washington--or in Sydney, = or Durban, or anywhere else? If British churches paid the kind of wages = common in the United States, I know for a fact that there are some = Anglican musicians in the US who would consider working in the = UK--although they would have to give up the luxury of having = congregations present on Sunday mornings. >=20 > I suspect that the willingness of British organists to work in the US = says more good than bad about American Anglicanism and American = candidates for certain key Anglican organ jobs. For all the university = organ department closings and the continued 19th century trend in the US = that results in tasteless and charismatic Benny Hinn Christianity, we're = still producing outstanding musicians at an unprecedented rate. While = some departments are closing, today's American Sacred Musicians are well = schooled in the art of musicianship. What's missing is jobs. Not because = we're hiring Brits for "important" jobs, but because we have allowed = church to be defined by bad taste and that supremely American (meaning = US) misunderstanding of republican democracy as a license for mob rule = and anti-intellectualism.=20 >=20 > Some food for thought and comment, > Bill H. > St. John's Bowdoin St., Boston. >=20 >=20 >=20 >=20  
(back) Subject: RE: [VERY LONG] A series of near-Holy Land Experiences, finale From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2004 16:13:14 -0600   Thank you, Alan, for your kind remarks.   And A. G., after a meeting this morning where I was identified as a "hostile attendee" I came home sick. Rick frisked me thoroughly, removed all sharp objects from my possession and reach, and injected me with cotton balls to soak up the excess bitchiness which I have exhibited the last couple days. We are waiting to see if it is a complete cure - I feel awfully bloated and I talk funny.   Seriously, I offended myself in my remarks, and humbly ask your forgiveness. I would have sent this as a personal e-mail to you, but since the original remarks were posted to the list, the retraction and apology should also be to the entire list.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Re: One If By Land, And Two If By Sea (grin) From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2004 20:25:13 EST   Bud, I was suggesting the the Anglican Communion was an outgrowth of the CofE, = not the ECUSA. I used some bad phrasing, obviously.   Bill H.