PipeChat Digest #4188 - Thursday, January 1, 2004
 
Re: Organists Shoes
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Baldwin Lose 16-foot Pedal
  by "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: Organists Shoes
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re:March and pets
  by "Dr. Amy Fleming" <docamy@alltel.net>
Re: Young church musicians (was RCs and Anglicans)
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Re: Organists Shoes
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Bits and Pieces...  Now music notation
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
Re: Organists Shoes
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Candlemas & Ash Wednesday music (OFF-TOPIC for Pipechat, sorta)
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Organists Shoes
  by "chemphill" <chemphill@wi.rr.com>
Re: Organists Shoes
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Organists Shoes
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: Organists Shoes
  by "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org>
Re: Organists Shoes ... NEXT! (grin)
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Organists Shoes
  by "Andrew Barss" <andrew.barss@ns.sympatico.ca>
Re: Organists Shoes ... NEXT! (grin)
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Organists Shoes
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Organists Shoes
  by <FastToccata@aol.com>
Re: Young church musicians (was RCs and Anglicans)
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Young church musicians
  by "Stephen Barker" <steve@sbarker.net>
Re: Young church musicians
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Organists Shoes From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Thu, 1 Jan 2004 05:10:31 EST   http://www.organmastershoes.com/   the best, most accurate, long-lasting organ shoes. happy new year- gfc   Gregory Ceurvorst M.M. Organ Performance Student Northwestern University Director of Music and Organist St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL 847.332.2788 home 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Baldwin Lose 16-foot Pedal From: "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Thu, 1 Jan 2004 05:10:41 -0600   Hello, Alicia: > Does anyone have any idea as to why the Baldwin > at my church would suddenly loose its 16' in the > pedal?... Some possible reasons: 1. Wire to pedal speaker disconnected. 2. Pedal speaker voice coil opened. 3. Amplifier sending signal to pedal speaker died. 4. Stop switch that activates that pedal stop is open. In the small details, you have several interactive possibilites that may need a service person. If the reason is (as listed above) number 1, you might find that yourself. Reconnect the pedal speaker wire. If you "don't know much about electronic anything," call a service person and let them have the headache of finding the source of the problem. F. Richard Burt ..  
(back) Subject: Re: Organists Shoes From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Thu, 1 Jan 2004 08:14:47 EST   In a message dated 1/1/2004 2:31:12 AM Eastern Standard Time, mailman_63127@yahoo.com writes:   > Where can one get a pair of organists shoes?   I prefer Capezio tap shoes.....   dale in Florida    
(back) Subject: Re:March and pets From: "Dr. Amy Fleming" <docamy@alltel.net> Date: Thu, 1 Jan 2004 08:25:01 -0600   Mr.Runyon ~ yes that's it. Maybe we can use it next year also. Thanks.   Regarding cats and their time clock. We have one that likes to get my dh = up at 5 to stroll around the deck until 6. He gets very upset if it snows! = We have a guinea pig the shreiks at us when we come in from outside wanting spinach leaves from the garden. Makes life interesting. For sheer = numbers of cats I have y'all beat if you count the ones at work that are waiting = for adoption but permenant residents I have 5. Amy Fleming Ozark Veterinary Hospital Harrison, Arkansas   P.S. to Bruce and the Baskerbeagles - I'm going to be going through the swamp in three weeks! Can hardly wait to see it again. My brother lives = in High Springs and I am going to a conference in Orlando this year for CEs.    
(back) Subject: Re: Young church musicians (was RCs and Anglicans) From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Thu, 1 Jan 2004 23:13:08 +0800   From the responses to my post that I have seen I don't really think the points I was making got through.Let me clarify:   1. The Vatican II and the Anglican Hierarchy have nothing at all to do with my denomination which is a union of Methodist, Presbyterian and Congregational. 2. With the exception of the RC and the Baptist Churches most of our congregations would be in the order of 100 or so except in the suburbs of the capital city where larger congregations exist. The Baptists are a success story; the Baptist Church in my small city (popn 30 000) have a building that seats about 800 people and three ministers. They have an ancient electronic organ and a grand piano and use the usual praise band. The RC Church has a larger congregation, a Johannus organ and large congregations with a lot of ethnic members. Their music is woeful. 3. I don't think there is the division between the denominations here that you seem to also play for Saturday night Mass in the RC, and occasionally for choral evensong in the main Anglican Church. The RC church is very klow church - no statues, no bells in communion. 4. My church budget is $120 000 per annum of which about $95 000 goes to pay for ministry. Maintenance costs are high for buildings more than a hundred years old. What money is available to pay an organist? None. We do get wedding and funeral fees. We are one of the viable churches in the city. 5. IN 99% of the churches there is not the work for an organist full time or even half time. In my case there is a small choir and I play fortnightly and traing the choir on Friday night. Most churches do not have a choir. One of those replying remarked that in playing without pay I would be depriving my successor of a paid job. Read my lips - there is no money for pay for any successor and there is not likely to be and in any case there is not enough work to even half occupy a successor..   Applying conditions in the USA across the board is generalisation to a high degree. The USA is not the world, and conditions vary greatly from one country to another. The big divide with Australia is in population. What is that of the USA? IN excess of 200 million? We have 20 million in total ina country the size of the USA and nearly 10 million of that live in Sydney and Melbourne. My state is over one million square miles in area (who said Texas was big? We have one cattle station the size of Texas!!!) but the total population is less than 2 million and of that 1.2 million live in the capital city. My city is the second in population and has 30 000 people.   I am sorry this is so long but I feel that the points I was making did not get through. There is no way an organist in Western Australia can expect a salary that he could live on with the possible exception of a couple of the cathedrals. I think even there the organist also may also teach to supplement income. Occasionally of course an organist is an ordained priest or brother or nun and draw no salary for his/her work in music. Bob Elms.   ---- Original Message ---- From: quilisma@cox.net To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Young church musicians (was RCs and Anglicans) Date: Wed, 31 Dec 2003 08:46:19 -0800   > >Three things happened: Vietnam, Vatican II, and the rise of the >mega-churches and "Contemporary Christian Music." > >In the first instance, a legitimate distrust of the government >turned >into wholesale iconoclasm on every front. There is a definite >dividing >line in the clergy: priests who went to seminary BEFORE 1960, and >priests who went to seminary AFTER 1960, both Roman and Anglican. > >Vatican II might have been Roman, but it spilled over into other >churches, particularly the high church Episcopal "anglo-papists" who >were inclined to say "God bless you" every time the pope sneezed ><G>. >It was used as an excuse to demolish architecture, liturgy and >music. I >have read the conciliar documents in the original Latin. Nothing of >the >sort is to be found in them. As much as I dislike current Roman >conservatism on social issues, they're spot-on in trying to curb the >liturgical and musical lawlessness in their churches. > >The brutal way the new US Episcopal Book of Common Prayer was >imposed >from on high represented a startling departure from the "live and >let >live" historical position of American Anglicanism, which tolerated >everything from Solemn High Morning Prayer to Solemn High Mass out >of >the Anglican Missal. General Convention would have been FAR better >off >to do what was done elsewhere in Anglicanism, notably in the Church >of >England: the old Prayer Book remains normative; anything else is >provisional and optional. > >A    
(back) Subject: Re: Organists Shoes From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Thu, 1 Jan 2004 10:47:00 EST   tap shoes work just fine too, but they don't give me the extra little bit = of traction needed for mobility that organmasters do.         Gregory Ceurvorst M.M. Organ Performance Student Northwestern University Director of Music and Organist St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL 847.332.2788 home 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Bits and Pieces... Now music notation From: <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Thu, 1 Jan 2004 10:56:42 EST   Hello crlester@137.com,   In reference to your comment:   =E8 I'm a bit embarrassed to say that, as computer literate =E8 (indeed, computer-dependent) as I am in just about =E8 every other area of my life, I have never mastered any =E8 of the computer music engraving programs. They're =E8 just too darn hard to use!   Have you tried Noteworthy Composer? NoteWorthy Software - Home of=20 NoteWorthy Composer Music Software=20   This is a simple program, and there's a free demo to download.   Another suggestion would be to use a program such as Cakewalk, and hook a=20 MIDI-compatible keyboard up to your computer. Then, simply play your music,= the=20 program will score it, and you can hear and edit what's written out. This i= s=20 what I will do, now that I've moved into my house and have room to set up a=20 keyboard in my office. <big grin>   Victoria    
(back) Subject: Re: Organists Shoes From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 1 Jan 2004 11:58:25 -0500   Having bought Capezios in Princeton years ago, where Westminster = students were always looking for shoes, I found that even for one who = practices once a year for an hour, they wore out very quickly. The = separation of the sole from the body of the shoe usually comes at the = wrong time, which can be quite dramatic! Not, of course, as dramatic as = when the soul separates from the body! Organmasters are really tough, = and I am happy to support a company that has our needs in mind. They are = very good to deal with.   New Year's Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com     ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Gfc234@aol.com=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Thursday, January 01, 2004 10:47 AM Subject: Re: Organists Shoes     tap shoes work just fine too, but they don't give me the extra little = bit of traction needed for mobility that organmasters do.         Gregory Ceurvorst M.M. Organ Performance Student Northwestern University Director of Music and Organist St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL 847.332.2788 home 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com  
(back) Subject: Candlemas & Ash Wednesday music (OFF-TOPIC for Pipechat, sorta) From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Thu, 01 Jan 2004 09:59:44 -0800   I sent these out last year, but people may have joined the list since = then.   I have the following (all simple modal SATB or fauxbourdon settings and English texts, unless otherwise noted)       BLESSING AND DISTRIBUTION OF CANDLES       Adorna thalamum   Asperges me - we sang it, rather than the priest reciting it ... pretty little setting, for those of you who sing Asperges on Sunday   Lumen ad revelationem   Responsum   Exsurge, Domine   Ye Who Own the Faith of Jesus (Daily, Daily) with all seven verses underlaid (grin)   Obtulerunt       AT THE MASS       Introit - Suscepimus   Gradual - Suscepimus   Alleluia - Senex puerum   Offertory (1) - Diffusa est   Offertory (2) - Ave Maria - SAB - Fr. Rossini   Communion - Responsum, with Psalm 111 (fauxbourdon)   Hail, Queen of Heaven Enthroned (Ave Regina caelorum) - SAB - Fr. Rossini       ERRRRRRRRRRRRRGH! Candlemas falls on MONDAY this year ... I suppose that means that at least some places will do the Blessing and Procession at First Evensong on Sunday ... we did it that way in past years, as I recall, so I should have the Psalms somewhere, set to fauxbourdons (1928 text).       ASH WEDNESDAY       Blessing and Imposition of Ashes:       Psalm 51 (fauxbourdon) - old OR new text   Exaudi nos   Immutemur   Juxta vestibulum   Emendemus       At the Mass:       Introit - (1) Misereris omnium - Gregorian   Introit - (2) Misereris omnium - SATB   Gradual and Tract - (1) Miserere - Gregorian   Gradual and Tract - (2) Miserere - SATB   Offertory - (1) Exaltabo - Gregorian   Offertory - (2) Exaltabo - SATB   Offertory - (3) Exaltabo - Fr. Rossini - unison, SA, or SAB versions available   Communion - (1) Qui meditabor - Gregorian       The ones marked "Gregorian" are the full, authentic melodies in modern notation ... sorry, no organ accompaniments ... I'm lazy (grin).   Hmmm ... don't seem to have written an Attende, Domine, or fauxbourdons for the Office Hymn(s) ... guess I have to do that (grin).   Cheers,   Bud                            
(back) Subject: Re: Organists Shoes From: "chemphill" <chemphill@wi.rr.com> Date: Thu, 1 Jan 2004 12:14:12 -0600   uh, I am suppose to wear shoes?=20 Tina ----- Original Message -----=20 From: jfc=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Thursday, January 01, 2004 1:29 AM Subject: Organists Shoes     Happy New Year:   Where can one get a pair of organists shoes? Are these custom made?   Thanks.   JC     "The love of great music is a joy that never fades"     -------------------------------------------------------------------------= ----- Do you Yahoo!? Find out what made the Top Yahoo! Searches of 2003  
(back) Subject: Re: Organists Shoes From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 01 Jan 2004 13:57:32 -0500   On 1/1/04 1:14 PM, "chemphill" <chemphill@wi.rr.com> wrote:   > uh, I am supposed to wear shoes? > Tina >=20 Well, they=B9re not really necessary if you=B9re playing something for manuals-only.   But otherwise . . . .   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Organists Shoes From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Thu, 1 Jan 2004 13:58:34 EST   In a message dated 1/1/2004 11:59:02 AM Eastern Standard Time, manderusa@earthlink.net writes: Having bought Capezios in Princeton years ago, where Westminster students were always looking for shoes, I found that even for one who practices = once a year for an hour, they wore out very quickly. The separation of the sole = from the body of the shoe usually comes at the wrong time, which can be quite dramatic! Not, of course, as dramatic as when the soul separates from the = body! Organmasters are really tough, and I am happy to support a company that = has our needs in mind. They are very good to deal with.   still on my second pair----no separation nothing in 15 years!!!!!!!   i stand by em anyway.   dale in florida    
(back) Subject: Re: Organists Shoes From: "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org> Date: Thu, 1 Jan 2004 14:20:14 -0500   > Where can one get a pair of organists shoes? Are these custom made? > > Thanks. >   In addition to Organ Master and Capezio, you might look at Tic Tac Toes. While they make mostly dance shoes, they also provide shoes for organists. = They can also provide a slightly higher heel which some folks find useful = for pedal work. Nice folks to deal with and I'm finding that they fit more comfortably than my OM pair does.   http://www.tictactoes.com/xcart/customer/organist_choose.htm   Cheers, TommyLee    
(back) Subject: Re: Organists Shoes ... NEXT! (grin) From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Thu, 01 Jan 2004 11:29:51 -0800   PLEASE, folks! We just did this to death before Christmas. I'm SURE all the information's still in the Archives.   I'll add my two cents' worth, though, since I'm here (grin) ... I had a pair of Capezio tap shoes that lasted from 1962 till 2003 (!), at which point I tossed them in the trash and retired (chuckle), and I played EVERY DAY for most of those forty-one years.   Bud   Keys4bach@aol.com wrote:   > In a message dated 1/1/2004 11:59:02 AM Eastern Standard Time, > manderusa@earthlink.net writes: > > Having bought Capezios in Princeton years ago, where Westminster > students were always looking for shoes, I found that even for one > who practices once a year for an hour, they wore out very quickly. > The separation of the sole from the body of the shoe usually comes > at the wrong time, which can be quite dramatic! Not, of course, as > dramatic as when the soul separates from the body! Organmasters are > really tough, and I am happy to support a company that has our needs > in mind. They are very good to deal with. > > > still on my second pair----no separation nothing in 15 years!!!!!!! > > i stand by em anyway. > > dale in florida      
(back) Subject: Re: Organists Shoes From: "Andrew Barss" <andrew.barss@ns.sympatico.ca> Date: Thu, 1 Jan 2004 15:53:07 -0400   Hi Tina,   There are some organists -- even (so I was once told) concert=20 organists! -- who would prefer playing in stocking feet to wearing=20 shoes.   Personally, I bought a pair of organ-master shoes in the early 80s and=20=   can't imagine playing the pedals without them. Organ shoes provide=20 great support, and control over the pedals. It's probably realistic to=20=   say that the vast majority of organists prefer playing with appropriate=20=   footwear.   Regards, Andrew Barss Halifax, Nova Scotia   On Thursday, January 1, 2004, at 02:14 PM, chemphill wrote:   > uh, I am suppose to wear shoes? > Tina > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: jfc > To: pipechat@pipechat.org > Sent: Thursday, January 01, 2004 1:29 AM > Subject: Organists Shoes > > Happy New Year: > =A0 > Where can one get a pair of organists shoes?=A0 Are these custom made? > =A0 > Thanks. > =A0 > JC > > > "The love of great music is a joy that never fades" > > > <image.tiff> > > Do you Yahoo!? > Find out what made the Top Yahoo! Searches of 2003 >    
(back) Subject: Re: Organists Shoes ... NEXT! (grin) From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Thu, 01 Jan 2004 14:04:31 -0600   I've never worn Capezios to play the organ (although my Capezio pointe shoes used to make conversation in studio class when I tied them on my backpack after ballet class). One thing I have noticed with Leo character shoes -I have some at home and I use them when I forget my OMs- is that the heel is small enough that it gets stuck between the pedals. Alicia Zeilenga Sub-Dean AGO@UI "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis"     -----Original Message----- From: quilisma@cox.net       > I'll add my two cents' worth, though, since I'm here (grin) ... I had a > pair of Capezio tap shoes that lasted from 1962 till 2003 (!), at which > point I tossed them in the trash and retired (chuckle), and I played > EVERY DAY for most of those forty-one years. > > Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: Organists Shoes From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Thu, 01 Jan 2004 14:16:19 -0600         > On 1/1/04 1:14 PM, "chemphill" <chemphill@wi.rr.com> wrote: > > uh, I am supposed to wear shoes? > Tina > Well, you don't have to, but if you are playing an Austin organ it tends to be desirable to do so, since because of the way the toe studs are grounded you tend to get electric shocks when you use them if you play the organ barefoot.   John Speller      
(back) Subject: Re: Organists Shoes From: <FastToccata@aol.com> Date: Thu, 1 Jan 2004 15:22:23 EST   I had a pair of Tic Tac Toe shoes and found that their heel is a little = more narrow than Organmaster's organ shoes and seemed to get in-between the = pedals easier. I also had problems with the heels getting marked up and then = they started looking awful. I do a lot of pedal work with my pieces.    
(back) Subject: Re: Young church musicians (was RCs and Anglicans) From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Thu, 1 Jan 2004 13:27:29 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   This is not a problem confined to the US of course.   I abandoned professional music in favour of a career in the world of commerce/finance, and I know of one cathedral assistant who ended up in insurance in the City of London.   I am always very grateful that a very broad education beyond music, enabled me to make the switch successfully.   Of course, finding an alternative means of employment does mean that music suffers. However, it does mean that whatever time is left for music tends to be quality time, and hugely enjoyable. I have personally never regretted the switch, once I gained the repertoire of the legal/financial world and carved out a good career.   Of course, the other advantage is independence. When I see churches self-destructing or having nothing to say, I can move sideways without penalty, as I have done in the past.   I think it would be fair to state that, other than at cathedral level in the UK, the vast majority of church appointees either teach or "do something else." I even know of one FRCO who is a bus conductor!! (OK...he likes buses)   At least one organist was a highly respected astronomer, in the form of Sir Bernard Lovell, who was responsible for the hugely powerful Joderel Bank radio telescope. He followed the example of William Herschel, who was Astronomer Royal and discovered the planet Uranus; one time the organist and choirmaster of Halifax Parish Church here in the UK.   It's vital to remain optimistic, and to face the challenges of life. Many who swop careers do really well, and do not regret the change. The worst thing is to be single-minded and inflexible.   As for MacDonalds, well they could do with a bit of talent and innovation right now!!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- Gfc234@aol.com wrote: > What do you > propose that people who have spent lots of money, > several years in school > studying, practicing, learning the trade etc.. do > for a living? Work at McDonalds > or some other low skill level job?   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? New Yahoo! Photos - easier uploading and sharing. http://photos.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Young church musicians From: "Stephen Barker" <steve@sbarker.net> Date: Thu, 01 Jan 2004 21:52:41 +0000   I'm one of those who would very much like to work in church music in a more full-time capacity - and I'm young (ish... is 26 still young?! I still FEEL young!) but I know in reality here in the UK its not going to happen. I wouldn't get into the Cathedral circuit as I haven't gone through the right way - Didn't go to Oxford or Cambridge and therefore wasn't an organ scholar there! My main job is to teach music full time which I also really enjoy, but I can understand why some people might give up church work when they have a family as there are times when it really takes over my life and I'm working 7 days a week well into each evening with marking, meetings, 2 rehearsals, 3 services, weddings etc etc... but then would I have it any other way?? no, probably not ;o)   So there are SOME young people willing to do it!   Steve Canterbury UK   Colin Mitchell wrote:   >Hello, > >This is not a problem confined to the US of course. > >I abandoned professional music in favour of a career >in the world of commerce/finance, and I know of one >cathedral assistant who ended up in insurance in the >City of London. > >I am always very grateful that a very broad education >beyond music, enabled me to make the switch >successfully. > >Of course, finding an alternative means of employment >does mean that music suffers. However, it does mean >that whatever time is left for music tends to be >quality time, and hugely enjoyable. I have personally >never regretted the switch, once I gained the >repertoire of the legal/financial world and carved out >a good career. > >Of course, the other advantage is independence. When I >see churches self-destructing or having nothing to >say, I can move sideways without penalty, as I have >done in the past. > >I think it would be fair to state that, other than at >cathedral level in the UK, the vast majority of church >appointees either teach or "do something else." I even >know of one FRCO who is a bus conductor!! (OK...he >likes buses) > >At least one organist was a highly respected >astronomer, in the form of Sir Bernard Lovell, who was >responsible for the hugely powerful Joderel Bank radio >telescope. He followed the example of William >Herschel, who was Astronomer Royal and discovered the >planet Uranus; one time the organist and choirmaster >of Halifax Parish Church here in the UK. > >It's vital to remain optimistic, and to face the >challenges of life. Many who swop careers do really >well, and do not regret the change. The worst thing is >to be single-minded and inflexible. > >As for MacDonalds, well they could do with a bit of >talent and innovation right now!! > >Regards, > >Colin Mitchell UK > >--- Gfc234@aol.com wrote: > > >>What do you >>propose that people who have spent lots of money, >>several years in school >>studying, practicing, learning the trade etc.. do >>for a living? Work at McDonalds >>or some other low skill level job? >> >> > >__________________________________ >Do you Yahoo!? >New Yahoo! Photos - easier uploading and sharing. >http://photos.yahoo.com/ >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Young church musicians From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Thu, 1 Jan 2004 14:39:38 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Stephen Barker misses a vital point!   Oxbridge qualification may well be a handicap in the modern age, because it is too traditional.   Not all cathedral/collegiate organists or their assistants are Oxbridge by any means; especially in the less traditional places. (Durham has always been a good alternative, by the way)   Many, many professional church musicians now work in more modern musical environments. Sometimes, there are openings for professional Music Directors, and for anyone who can move out of the "Psalms of the day and a setting of the canticles" frame of mind, there are possibilities.   Nowadays, the best jobs are in broadcasting, which require a far wider repertoire.   I personally regret not having greater and earlier exposure to Jazz and light music, not to mention things like Gospel Singing/Orchestral playing etc.......I was brought up in a very traditional way.   My switch away from church music was really the self knowledge that I was ill-fitted to change, but saw the old ways dying on their feet. Having got away from church music as a daily thing, I actually re-discovered the joy of music, by deliberately exposing myself to jazz and light music.   Did it do me any good?   I'll tell you all something for free.....IT MADE ME A FAR BETTER CLASSICAL MUSICIAN!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Stephen Barker <steve@sbarker.net> wrote: > I'm one of those who would very much like to work in > church music in a > more full-time capacity - and I'm young (ish... is > 26 still young?! I > still FEEL young!) but I know in reality here in > the UK its not going > to happen. I wouldn't get into the Cathedral > circuit as I haven't gone > through the right way - Didn't go to Oxford or > Cambridge and therefore > wasn't an organ scholar there!   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? New Yahoo! Photos - easier uploading and sharing. http://photos.yahoo.com/