PipeChat Digest #4191 - Friday, January 2, 2004
 
Re: Young church musicians (was RCs and Anglicans)
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
typos
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
Re: Young church musicians (was RCs and Anglicans)
  by "chemphill" <chemphill@wi.rr.com>
Hinners (was typos)
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Re: organists' pay
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Hinners (was typos)
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Organists and Compensation
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Bulletins
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Organists and Compensation
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Organists Shoes
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Musical Training for the Clergy in Seminary
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Playing the organ
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Young church musicians (was RCs and Anglicans) From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 2 Jan 2004 03:34:57 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Monty Bennett asked why music should suffer when one takes on non-musical work.   In my case, I moved into financial/legal work in the City of London, which consumed an awesome 70 hours a week of my time........mega money, mega pressure and no time to spend it.   I actually have SYMPATHY with those bright young things who screech out of the office at a thousand miles per hour, dash to the pub before closing time, go home, snort cocaine and crash out for a few hours.   Like any financial centre such as NY or London, the money business is a complete madhouse.   I don't think I take things any easier even now, but at least I have some choice over how and where I work, so I am in control of my life.   What a strange life I lead....go to an office, go to a funeral, go drive a big 18-wheel truck (that's fun!), back to an office, another truck, a wedding, church on Sundays....continue writing the novel, babble away on pipechat and stroke the cat.   Variety, as they say, is the spice of life!!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- RMB10@aol.com wrote: > Colin Mitchell wrote: > > <snip> > >I abandoned professional music in favour of a > career > >in the world of commerce/finance, and I know of one > >cathedral assistant who ended up in insurance in > the > >City of London. > > > >I am always very grateful that a very broad > education > >beyond music, enabled me to make the switch > >successfully. > > > >Of course, finding an alternative means of > employment > >does mean that music suffers. However, it does mean > >that whatever time is left for music tends to be > >quality time, and hugely enjoyable. I have > personally > >never regretted the switch, once I gained the > >repertoire of the legal/financial world and carved > out > >a good career. > > <snip> > > I, for one, chose to leave full time church work, > for a variety of > reasons--many of you on the list here know the > story--and go back to school to become a > funeral director. For several years, I chose not to > hold down a "permanent" > church position, rather just doing substitute or > interim work, so I wasn't > confined to a bench. I got multiple calls each week > from different churches to > play--I could have played at 3 or 4 churches on any > given Sunday, if it was > possible for me to be in several places at the same > time. After about a year, I > had recovered from burn-out enough to consider > taking a regular position, but I > liked the flexibility that substitute positions gave > me, plus, I didn't have > to deal with church politics--I walked in, I played, > I walked out with a > check. I had all the enjoyment of playing, all the > benefits of playing, and none > of the headaches. > I finally was worn down by a church to take a > permanent position about a year > and a half ago, and unfortunately, a lot of the > things I was promised there, > were not lived up to on the church's end, so at the > end of my 6 month "trial" > period, I chose to leave on friendly terms. I > accepted the permanent position > where I had been the interim for about 2 1/2 years, > and am much happier. The > great thing about having a "real" job and a church > job is that I have a > steady salary and a great side income. My "full > time" job, while it pays a full > time salary, takes about 25-30 hours a week, so when > coupled with my church > position, still only puts me at working 40 or so > hours a week. The down side is > that I really only have one true day off a week, so > if friends want to go out > of town or if want to do anything, I have to go on a > Friday and Saturday, so I > can be back for Sunday morning. > > My question to Colin, however, is why does the music > suffer if a person has a > non-music job and a church position? I still > practice. I play for a local > community choir. I play for weddings, funerals and > other special services at > many local area churches, in addition to doing > concerts around the country and > playing for some organ companies and a carillon > bellfoundry. I probably do > more music now than I did when I was in full-time > music, because my schedule > allows me to play more. If anything, my music has > gotten better because I'm > forced to keep an steady practice schedule, whereas > before, I would waltz in and > just pop off some organ piece that I had been > playing since college. I now > work to keep them up, but the benefit is accuracy > and musicianship. At least in > my case, the music hasn't suffered because I'm not > working in full time music. > > I enjoy my music so much more these days. I chose > to do it now, I don't have > to do it. When music became a chore, I knew I was > getting burned out. > Having the huge instrument at Calvary to play wasn't > even fun, it was just a job. > It got to the point where I dreaded having to go > play the noontime recitals. > Church services were dreadful. The church politics > totally ruined what could > have been a great experience, but I know I'm better > off for leaving and going > to mortuary school. I'm happier, my stress level is > down, I've got a great > job at a funeral home, my boss is flexible with my > church schedule, and I've got > a fantastic church job where I'm happy and the organ > is appreciated. What > more could I ask for? > > Monty Bennett >     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? New Yahoo! Photos - easier uploading and sharing. http://photos.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: typos From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2004 05:48:16 -0600   Gary Black wrote: > Coming from Illinios (SIC), home of Hinners pipe organ company in Pekin = at one > time, I attended a recital and the name of the organ company, Hinners = was > printed in the program. Due to the Gothic type that Hinners used for = their > name plates, the name was printed. Himmers organ company.   True Confessions time! I did worse than that in my mis-interpretation! VERY early on in my organbuilding career, I was placing an ad in a Trade Magazine for a Hinners organ for a reason that I have long since forgotten about. When I sent in the ad copy, I mistakenly mis-interpreted the Builder's Plate as saying "Kinners, instead of Hinners!"   I just didn't know any better, but at least, I had an excuse! I had grown up in west Michigan and had never had any exposure to Hinners Organs until some time after I had moved here to central Illinois. And boy-howdy, do I know about Hinners organs NOW!!!).   Thankfully, the Trade Magazine Editor knew much more about Hinners organs than I did at the time and saved me from potential embarrassment by correcting the copy of the ad accordingly and then sent me a short but kindly note to that effect. Live and learn!   But Gary's right that the Hinners Builder's Plates were most difficult to decipher and all kinds of mis-interpretations are possible!   Faithfully,   G.A. -- Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO <>< Schneider Pipe Organs, Inc. 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (877) 944-2454 TOLL-FREE (217) 944-2527 FAX arpschneider@starband.net Home Office EMAIL arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com URL ADDRESS  
(back) Subject: Re: Young church musicians (was RCs and Anglicans) From: "chemphill" <chemphill@wi.rr.com> Date: Fri, 2 Jan 2004 06:03:50 -0600   Not to go off topic, but.. And not to get so serious, but your comments reminded of the awful time I had giving CPR instructions over the phone to a distraught family as they desperately tried to save their family member of 42 years of age. The next day I discovered that they belonged to the church where I played at and guess who was going to play for the funeral, me! I never could tell them = who I was. The music was arranged by the pastoral associate and I never spoke = to them. It was just awful.   But my best friends and work associates knew how to get to laugh about it. They accused me of double dipping. These were the same to guys who taped = me into my chair on a different occasion while I was giving CPR instructions, knowing that I couldn't protest.   Tina in Wisconsin with a cat that thinks she is a prairie dog.   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, January 02, 2004 5:34 AM Subject: Re: Young church musicians (was RCs and Anglicans)     > Hello, > > Monty Bennett asked why music should suffer when one > takes on non-musical work. > > In my case, I moved into financial/legal work in the > City of London, which consumed an awesome 70 hours a > week of my time........mega money, mega pressure and > no time to spend it. > > I actually have SYMPATHY with those bright young > things who screech out of the office at a thousand > miles per hour, dash to the pub before closing time, > go home, snort cocaine and crash out for a few hours. > > Like any financial centre such as NY or London, the > money business is a complete madhouse. > > I don't think I take things any easier even now, but > at least I have some choice over how and where I work, > so I am in control of my life. > > What a strange life I lead....go to an office, go to a > funeral, go drive a big 18-wheel truck (that's fun!), > back to an office, another truck, a wedding, church on > Sundays....continue writing the novel, babble away on > pipechat and stroke the cat. > > Variety, as they say, is the spice of life!! > > Regards, > > Colin Mitchell UK > > > --- RMB10@aol.com wrote: > > Colin Mitchell wrote: > > > > <snip> > > >I abandoned professional music in favour of a > > career > > >in the world of commerce/finance, and I know of one > > >cathedral assistant who ended up in insurance in > > the > > >City of London. > > > > > >I am always very grateful that a very broad > > education > > >beyond music, enabled me to make the switch > > >successfully. > > > > > >Of course, finding an alternative means of > > employment > > >does mean that music suffers. However, it does mean > > >that whatever time is left for music tends to be > > >quality time, and hugely enjoyable. I have > > personally > > >never regretted the switch, once I gained the > > >repertoire of the legal/financial world and carved > > out > > >a good career. > > > > <snip> > > > > I, for one, chose to leave full time church work, > > for a variety of > > reasons--many of you on the list here know the > > story--and go back to school to become a > > funeral director. For several years, I chose not to > > hold down a "permanent" > > church position, rather just doing substitute or > > interim work, so I wasn't > > confined to a bench. I got multiple calls each week > > from different churches to > > play--I could have played at 3 or 4 churches on any > > given Sunday, if it was > > possible for me to be in several places at the same > > time. After about a year, I > > had recovered from burn-out enough to consider > > taking a regular position, but I > > liked the flexibility that substitute positions gave > > me, plus, I didn't have > > to deal with church politics--I walked in, I played, > > I walked out with a > > check. I had all the enjoyment of playing, all the > > benefits of playing, and none > > of the headaches. > > I finally was worn down by a church to take a > > permanent position about a year > > and a half ago, and unfortunately, a lot of the > > things I was promised there, > > were not lived up to on the church's end, so at the > > end of my 6 month "trial" > > period, I chose to leave on friendly terms. I > > accepted the permanent position > > where I had been the interim for about 2 1/2 years, > > and am much happier. The > > great thing about having a "real" job and a church > > job is that I have a > > steady salary and a great side income. My "full > > time" job, while it pays a full > > time salary, takes about 25-30 hours a week, so when > > coupled with my church > > position, still only puts me at working 40 or so > > hours a week. The down side is > > that I really only have one true day off a week, so > > if friends want to go out > > of town or if want to do anything, I have to go on a > > Friday and Saturday, so I > > can be back for Sunday morning. > > > > My question to Colin, however, is why does the music > > suffer if a person has a > > non-music job and a church position? I still > > practice. I play for a local > > community choir. I play for weddings, funerals and > > other special services at > > many local area churches, in addition to doing > > concerts around the country and > > playing for some organ companies and a carillon > > bellfoundry. I probably do > > more music now than I did when I was in full-time > > music, because my schedule > > allows me to play more. If anything, my music has > > gotten better because I'm > > forced to keep an steady practice schedule, whereas > > before, I would waltz in and > > just pop off some organ piece that I had been > > playing since college. I now > > work to keep them up, but the benefit is accuracy > > and musicianship. At least in > > my case, the music hasn't suffered because I'm not > > working in full time music. > > > > I enjoy my music so much more these days. I chose > > to do it now, I don't have > > to do it. When music became a chore, I knew I was > > getting burned out. > > Having the huge instrument at Calvary to play wasn't > > even fun, it was just a job. > > It got to the point where I dreaded having to go > > play the noontime recitals. > > Church services were dreadful. The church politics > > totally ruined what could > > have been a great experience, but I know I'm better > > off for leaving and going > > to mortuary school. I'm happier, my stress level is > > down, I've got a great > > job at a funeral home, my boss is flexible with my > > church schedule, and I've got > > a fantastic church job where I'm happy and the organ > > is appreciated. What > > more could I ask for? > > > > Monty Bennett > > > > > __________________________________ > Do you Yahoo!? > New Yahoo! Photos - easier uploading and sharing. > http://photos.yahoo.com/ > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Hinners (was typos) From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2004 08:38:47 -0600   What about trying to read the stop knobs? Before I started taking lessons, all I could do on the Hinners was draw a stop and see how it sounded. I don't see how anyone could figure them out unless they were very familiar with the names. Alicia Zeilenga Sub-Dean AGO@UI "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis"     -----Original Message----- From: Richard Schneider <arpschneider@starband.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2004 05:48:16 -0600 Subject: typos   > Gary Black wrote: > > > Coming from Illinios (SIC), home of Hinners pipe organ company in > Pekin at one > > time, I attended a recital and the name of the organ company, Hinners > was > > printed in the program. Due to the Gothic type that Hinners used for > their > > name plates, the name was printed. Himmers organ company. > > True Confessions time! I did worse than that in my mis-interpretation! > VERY early on in my organbuilding career, I was placing an ad in a > Trade > Magazine for a Hinners organ for a reason that I have long since > forgotten > about. When I sent in the ad copy, I mistakenly mis-interpreted the > Builder's Plate as saying "Kinners, instead of Hinners!" > > I just didn't know any better, but at least, I had an excuse! I had > grown > up in west Michigan and had never had any exposure to Hinners Organs > until > some time after I had moved here to central Illinois. And boy-howdy, > do I > know about Hinners organs NOW!!!). > > Thankfully, the Trade Magazine Editor knew much more about Hinners > organs > than I did at the time and saved me from potential embarrassment by > correcting the copy of the ad accordingly and then sent me a short but > kindly note to that effect. Live and learn! > > But Gary's right that the Hinners Builder's Plates were most difficult > to > decipher and all kinds of mis-interpretations are possible! > > Faithfully, > > G.A. > -- > Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO <>< > Schneider Pipe Organs, Inc. > 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 > Kenney, IL 61749-0137 > (217) 944-2454 VOX > (877) 944-2454 TOLL-FREE > (217) 944-2527 FAX > arpschneider@starband.net Home Office EMAIL > arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL > http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com URL ADDRESS > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Re: organists' pay From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2004 07:07:37 -0800       terry hicks wrote:   > There are three crucial issues in organists receiving fair payment. > > 1) Parishioners not tithing. This has been touched on by Bud. People > need to be instilled from childhood with the fact that the church can > not fulfill it's Christian mission/ministry without adequate finances. > This means more than just keeping the doors open for weekends, funerals, > and weddings. There are plenty of so-called "poor" churches whose > members have nice homes & cars, plus creature comforts galore. The > church simply gets whats left after the cigarettes are bought, the > expensive sneakers are purchased, there's a second TV, etc.   Yepyepyep. > > 2) The ludicrous notion of small towns, villages, even cities having > several church buildings instead of sharing or even combining churches. > I grew up in a rural area, so I know what goes on. Several churches of > the same denomination exist because of divisive "pride" or un-Christian > attitudes. Hence, there are small churches unnecessarily struggling to > pay for clergy, maintenance, etc., and having wretched music because of > ill-equipped volunteer or low paid musicians.   "Union" churches used to be common in the rural Midwest ...mostly Lutheran and Evangelische Kirchen. With the Concordat, it's now possible for ELCA and ECUSA congregations to share facilities (and musicians), and indeed Buzard just installed a fine organ in one such church.   But don't tell that to the Southern Baptists (chuckle) ... in the Deep South, there's a Southern Baptist church on every street corner, no matter HOW small the town (grin).   I have to say that the Mormons have the right idea ... their stake-houses essentially function as cathedrals or regional centers, with several wards (parishes) sharing the same building.   In Europe, rather than closing historic churches that are geographically close together, they keep them open, combine the parishes, and have services in each of the churches in rotation, Sunday by Sunday. That's a little hard to keep track of ... I chased Sunday Mass RIGHT round Innsbruck one summer (grin) ... but it seems to work.   > 3) Music is a ministry the same as what the clergy do is a ministry. > The life-blood of any church is it's worship. It is there that people > are nourished and also challenged to do the mission of the church. When > will people/clergy get that?   What *I* don't understand is that LITURGICAL churches don't get it. Preaching churches rise or fall on the skill of the preacher; liturgical churches rise or fall on the beauty of the liturgy and music.   > It's no wonder that praise bands have taken over. Why would people want > to be lead by an untrained organist/pianist playing on some insipid > instrument? It takes a well-trained keyboardist to make even a piece of > junk sound good. It's easier to find guitarists and drum players who > play better than some "organists" I've > heard. > > Bless any trained musician who plays for free out of love.   But a lot of our colleagues can't seem to grasp that that DEVALUES music in the eyes of the congregation and governing body. "You get what you pay for." Nobody expects a plumber to fix to pipes for nothing; nobody expects the roofer to mend the roof for nothing.   I am just > very skeptical of churches that claim poverty, no matter what the size > of membership. >   In the United States, yes; in other countries, yes and no ... in England particularly, they are forced to keep historic churches open that have 10 members, because of ancient charters, etc. AND the fact that the congregations simply REFUSE to combine with other small parishes.   But it still comes back to tithing, basically. The rector of Newport Beach preached a good sermon on stewardship Sunday about that ... "as long as haven't surrendered the primary control of your MONEY to God, you still haven't surrendered your LIFE to him."   The text was "lay not up for yourselves treasures upon earth, where moth and rust doth corrupt."   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: Hinners (was typos) From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2004 09:00:57 -0600       Alicia Zeilenga wrote:   >What about trying to read the stop knobs? > To some extent one reads what one expects to read, and it took me a very long time to notice, for example, that on Father Willis organs SALICIONAL is generally spelt SALCIONAL. Sometimes there are misprints on drawknobs. One famous one was on the Dutch organ in Eton College, which has a stop which should have been named BAARPIJP; for several decades the knob actually read BAARPUP. I think the same organ also had a stop named TREMOLO 1.1/3', so I think the engraver must have been having a bad hair day.   John Speller      
(back) Subject: Re: Organists and Compensation From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2004 10:22:02 -0500   On 1/1/04 6:42 PM, "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> wrote:   > Statistically, the average congregation in the US has an attendance of = well > UNDER 100 on a Sunday morning.   Dennis, I've thought that to be the case (and still do). I'd like to = "back up" my thoughts (and yours) with statistics. Can you help me with a = source? (Meanwhile, I'll look for same myself--but it'll be a few days.) > > Who is Pastor of a church of 400 members, and the ONLY organist of any = sort > in the whole church, except for one lady confined to a nursing home. > By "the whole church" are you meaning "congregation" or "denomination"?   Does your denomination have colleges? With music departments? Is there pressure on those departments (if they exist) to PRODUCE at least mildly competent musicians? Is that a way to go? (I think it's made a HUGE difference for Lutherans.)   Alan      
(back) Subject: Re: Bulletins From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2004 10:30:00 -0500   On 1/1/04 7:52 PM, "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net> wrote:   > It's a "breather", methinks.....   Oh, that's great. You can use it. And The Church can certainly enjoy you upon your return, in whatever capacity.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Organists and Compensation From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2004 10:44:54 -0500   Bud's account (only a sample snipped below) is stunningly unusual and an object of my huge admiration. But there are many scores of similar = accounts only five or ten percent as wonderful. His mention of teaching the next generation(s) is KEY. If his central Florida could do what they've done, then anyplace can do better than it is (and has been) doing.   Alan   On 1/1/04 8:19 PM, "quilisma@cox.net" <quilisma@cox.net> wrote:   > They all worked; the churches maintained them; the "organ man" came > around twice a year, before Christmas and before Easter; there were > people to play them, mostly women, mostly piano teachers. They weren't > great organs or great organists, but Miss Pet Harper at Holy Episcopal > Church could find her way through Solemn Mass; so could Mrs. Greenawalt > over at St. Thomas RC Church; Mrs. Addie Wood could get through Messiah, > the Seven Last Words, and The Crucifixion over at Mulberry Methodist; > Miss Margaret Clark (my distant cousin and the high school choral > director) could get through Schubert's Great is Jehovah the Lord and his > 23rd Psalm at the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church; First Southern > Baptist had a THREE-manual Moller, and a FULL-TIME minister of music as > early as 1950 ... and this was in a town of 12,000 souls.    
(back) Subject: Re: Organists Shoes From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2004 10:46:59 -0500   On 1/1/04 8:25 PM, "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> wrote:   > I know of one case where a pedalboard was completely wrecked by a small = boy > throwing up on it.   He grew up to be a music critic?   Alan    
(back) Subject: Musical Training for the Clergy in Seminary From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 2 Jan 2004 10:49:12 -0500   Dear Listpersons,   As I like to call him, "Alan, Freed from all restraint" writes the = following eminently sensible thing:   > Does your denomination have colleges? With music departments? Is there > pressure on those departments (if they exist) to PRODUCE at least mildly > competent musicians? Is that a way to go? (I think it's made a HUGE > difference for Lutherans.)   When I was a student at The Juilliard in the early 60s, my partner and I maintained the old Roosevelt Organ at General Seminary, and got to know = and like the place. We often attended the Evensong that ended every Sunday there, done wonderfully well by the students, singing with great intelligence and enthusiasm. Ray Brown was the formidable musician in = charge in those days. Every incoming seminarian had a voice and music reading = test, and if he (no she in those days, sadly) failed, was required to attend = group and private lessons for how long, I do not know. The results were plain to hear at any service in that lovely chapel, and I suspect that the results also resonated throughout the country in the churches to which the seminarians were appointed after graduation. The wonderful David Hurd is, = I believe, in the seminary post now, and I hope he is given the same mandate as was Ray Brown some 45 years ago.   Cheers,   Malcolm - who awakened to an inch of fresh snow this morning, soon to melt (the snow, not me!).          
(back) Subject: Playing the organ From: "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Fri, 2 Jan 2004 09:58:57 -0600   Randy asks: "Dennis, I've been meaning to ask: do you indeed play the organ at the church where you are pastor? That would be way cool!"   Yes, I do, but only one Sunday a month. The rest of the time we have a Clavinova or a piano, alas. People enjoy the organ, but it's a bit much to do it all the time, but at least this way, they don't forget they have an organ and they do look forward to it.   Well, most people do. One lady told me I "couldn't possibly lead a service AND play the organ," and another lady sniffed, "If you want to be the organist, then resign as the pastor and be the organist."   The organ, alas, is an eminently forgettable Yamaha Electone.     Dennis Steckley   Every gun that is made and every warship that is launched, signifies in the final sense a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed--Dwight Eisenhower