PipeChat Digest #4198 - Monday, January 5, 2004
 
RE: hymn tune
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
Re: J. S. Bach Edition
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Dupre Ed. 8 Little Preludes & Fugues
  by "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com>
Re: trains (was HAPPY CHRISTMAS!)
  by "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net>
Re: bulletin typos
  by "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net>
Re: trains (was HAPPY CHRISTMAS!)
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: bulletin typos
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Is the Church and the organ in a bad way?
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Banjo/organ? + accordian
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Re: Is the Church in a bad way?
  by <reedstop@charter.net>
Re: J. S. Bach Edition
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Re: J. S. Bach Edition
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
RE: J. S. Bach Edition
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Re: Gregorian Chant accompaniments
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: J. S. Bach Edition (Dupre Editions)
  by <OrgelspielerKMD@aol.com>
Re: PipeChat Digest #4197 - 01/05/04
  by <hydrant@baskerbeagles.com>
taking the time to learn how your OWN fingers work
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
The Eight Little
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
 

(back) Subject: RE: hymn tune From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 10:32:28 -0000   It is just called "Jerusalem" and has long been connected with the = Womens Institute - the stereotype calls for women selling jam (jelly) and = singing it. It also features as a regular part of "The Last Night of the Proms" = from the Royal Albert Hall - though many over here dislike it, along with = "Land of Hope and Glory" for being to jingoistic.   Will Light Coventry UK     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of black Sent: 05 January 2004 05:57 To: PipeChat Subject: hymn tune   HI list, I went to the movies and saw Calendar Girls the other night. = In the movie was a hymn entitled, New Jerusalem? I have never heard it = before and fell for this in a big way; what a beautiful and powerful hymn! If = any of you sing this at church or can tell me more about it; I would be most appreciative. We sure don't sing it in the UMC. (oh, don't get me = started) lol Thanks, Gary     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Re: J. S. Bach Edition From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 05:37:59 EST   In a message dated 1/4/2004 10:36:21 PM Central Standard Time, = dcase@puc.edu writes: I learned from and taught from this edition for many years. How I regret the fingering contortions it required. Using more appropriate fingerings and pedaling will make them much easier to play. Not only will it make them much easier to play, it will automatically give = a much better articulation.   Gregory Ceurvorst M.M. Organ Performance Student Northwestern University Director of Music and Organist St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL 847.332.2788 home 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Dupre Ed. 8 Little Preludes & Fugues From: "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com> Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 06:56:30 -0500   >Subject: Re: J. S. Bach Edition >From: <quilisma@cox.net> >Date: Sun, 04 Jan 2004 18:41:07 -0800   >George Butterfield at Organ Stop in San Diego pointed out to me that >it's still in print, and can be ordered from Presser, at a cost of about >$50 per volume. THAT part of the info may be out of date ... I thought >Presser lost all the French imports to somebody else recently.   Various of the Dupre volumes appear on Ebay regularly. A while back I = bought three for about $36. They're not in new condition--in fact, I had to tape one cover back on--but that's still a lot more affordable than new.    
(back) Subject: Re: trains (was HAPPY CHRISTMAS!) From: "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 07:10:49 -0600   Never thought about clocks - but I do have them in every room - wall clocks, desk clocks, chiming clocks, cuckoo clock, etc - and they are almost all old with real moving parts. I think the clock thing is probably just that issue. I often use clocks as an example in trying to explain to people the difference between having a pipe organ and having a digital organ, particularly when they can't discern a noticible difference in sound. Both clocks with movement and electronic/electric/quartz/what-have-you clocks tell time and serve their purpose. In fact, the newer ones may be more accurate. But the newer clocks represent technology - just as a good digital organ represents fine technology. But a clock with movement, just as a pipe organ designed and made with human hands, is craftsmanship, passed down through the ages - a work of art in the making, not just the using.   Oh - and I like trains, too.   Margo   PS - have any of you seen the jewelry that is made with old stamps of musical instruments combined with watch parts. I got a pin at TMEA one year that is a stamp of a pipe organ combined with the face and internal parts of a watch.   black wrote: > I love clocks, I have several myself. Gary > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: Gfc234@aol.com <mailto:Gfc234@aol.com> > To: pipechat@pipechat.org <mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Tuesday, December 30, 2003 8:49 AM > Subject: Re: trains (was HAPPY CHRISTMAS!) > > In a message dated 12/30/2003 8:48:59 AM Central Standard Time, > gblack@ocslink.com <mailto:gblack@ocslink.com> writes: > > I have also found a commonality too and that is a liking for > antique clocks. > Anyone else found that to be true too? Gary > > Our fellow listmember Devon Hollingsworth has quite a collection of > clocks! > > Gregory Ceurvorst > M.M. Organ Performance Student > Northwestern University > Director of Music and Organist > St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL > 847.332.2788 home > 708.243.2549 mobile > gfc234@aol.com <http://gfc234@aol.com/> >      
(back) Subject: Re: bulletin typos From: "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 07:20:21 -0600   My favorite is one that appeared quite a few years ago at my present church, but is still famous. In the days when we called Pentecost Sunday "Whitsunday" - the secretary put the name in big capitals at the top of the bulletin. And, you guessed it, she missed the w key and hit an s - and no one noticed when they proofed the bulletin - but on Sunday morning - everyone noticed, as a wave of giggles spread through the church at the beginning of the service.   Margo    
(back) Subject: Re: trains (was HAPPY CHRISTMAS!) From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 05:48:46 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   I happen to believe that modern micro-circuits are also works of art!   I am personally fascinated by the progress of digital organs, pianos and all the other simulators on the market.....who would have thought thirty years ago, that they could be considered rivals, let alone MUSICAL instruments?   Will music technology grind to a halt once a certain "satisfaction level" has been achieved?   If the money continues to flow, as it well may, then I shudder to think what COULD be achieved in the NEXT thirty years.   I prefer not to speculate the relative fate of craftsmen.....perhaps I don't have the stomach for it. Tradition dies hard, but of course, there will always be great craftsmen around.   The deciding factor will be financial contstraints, for in the pursuit of digital perfection, it may well turn out that the development costs would be prohibitive.   After all, we don't want to "invest" our money in an instrument with a working life of perhaps thirty years, when we could properly invest our money in something only slightly more expensive, which would last perhaps a hundred years.   After all, you don't feel the need to stamp on a classic Rolex or wrench the cuckoo clock from the wall, when they go wrong........   It's all about style, isn't it?   There is a tradition in Scotland, where people fling open the train windows and throw money into the River Forth as they cross the old steel cantilever railway bridge. (I'm quite into bridges)   They don't do the same on the buses crossing the new suspension bridge!   It's all about "style" isn't it?   Regards,     Colin Mitchell UK     --- Margo Dillard <dillardm@airmail.net> wrote:   > Never thought about clocks - but I do have them in > every room - wall > clocks, desk clocks, chiming clocks, cuckoo clock, > etc - and they are > almost all old with real moving parts.   >...the newer clocks represent technology -> ...   >...a clock with movement, just as a pipe > organ designed and made with human hands, is > craftsmanship         __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? New Yahoo! Photos - easier uploading and sharing. http://photos.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: bulletin typos From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 05:52:36 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Hee hee!   I just remembered the one which referred to "Educasion Sunday."   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       --- Margo Dillard <dillardm@airmail.net> wrote: > > In the days when we > called Pentecost > Sunday "Whitsunday" - the secretary put the name in > big capitals at the > top of the bulletin. And, you guessed it, she > missed the w key and hit > an s   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? New Yahoo! Photos - easier uploading and sharing. http://photos.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Is the Church and the organ in a bad way? From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 06:05:18 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   I shall not say another word after this.....I promise.   I hasten to add that ministers insisting on "truth", are really preaching about "faith."   It's the same process as the old organist playing Bach who, on reaching a mind boggling crescendo on a four manual Harrison & Harrison built in 1927, had the gall to announce, "If only Bach could have had an organ like this to play!"   I thank God that Jesus and Bach weren't incurable romantics!!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK           --- ProOrgo53@aol.com wrote:   > I hasten to > insist that ministers preaching Genesis, the Virgin > Birth, Miracles (both > Biblical and miracles today), Resurrection, etc., > are ministers preaching truth, > believable truth.     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? New Yahoo! Photos - easier uploading and sharing. http://photos.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Banjo/organ? + accordian From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 06:10:02 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Indeed he did, with both feet at the same time. Wasn't the source Mattheson?   Of course, the easy way is to improvise the effect, by playing in the style of Biber with a pretend violin, and sitting on a large Tom Cat whilst playing the pedals.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       --- Randolph Runyon <runyonr@muohio.edu> wrote: > You were carrying on a grand old tradition. > Nicolaus Bruhns was said to > have played the violin while accompanying himself on > the pedals.     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? New Yahoo! Photos - easier uploading and sharing. http://photos.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Re: Is the Church in a bad way? From: <reedstop@charter.net> Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 9:44:58 -0500   What a sad testimony to the times in which we live, but...I can agree that = we could get back on topic.   Jeff > From: "Octaaf" <octaaf@charter.net> > Date: 2004/01/05 Mon AM 04:55:35 EST > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Subject: Re: Is the Church in a bad way? > > WHATEVER!!! Now, let's get back on TOPIC and leave religion out of it.      
(back) Subject: Re: J. S. Bach Edition From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 23:00:14 +0800   No I didn't know Del. Prove it! Bob Elms.   >(As you probably know, Bach was not the composer of these works.) >Del W. Case >Pacific Union College >Angwin, CA >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related >topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >    
(back) Subject: Re: J. S. Bach Edition From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 09:23:23 -0600   I was at a lecture where Christof Wolff spent quite a lot of time showing why he believed the famous Tocatta and Fugue in d minor were authentic. (Most of the listeners found it necessary to slip away for coffee or practice during the lecture, but we all got the gist of it.) Does anyone know if he has done any research on the little pieces in question? Alicia Zeilenga Sub-Dean AGO@UI "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis"     -----Original Message----- From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> To: dcase@puc.edu, pipechat@pipechat.org Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 23:00:14 +0800 Subject: Re: J. S. Bach Edition   > No I didn't know Del. Prove it! > Bob Elms. > > >(As you probably know, Bach was not the composer of these works.) > >Del W. Case > >Pacific Union College > >Angwin, CA > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related > >topics > >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: RE: J. S. Bach Edition From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 09:25:45 -0600   While they were out getting coffee or practicing they must have missed the spelling tutorial. :-)   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Alicia Zeilenga Sent: Monday, January 05, 2004 9:23 AM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: J. S. Bach Edition   I was at a lecture where Christof Wolff spent quite a lot of time=20 showing why he believed the famous Tocatta and Fugue in d minor were=20 authentic. (Most of the listeners found it necessary to slip away for=20 coffee or practice during the lecture, but we all got the gist of it.) =20 Does anyone know if he has done any research on the little pieces in=20 question? Alicia Zeilenga Sub-Dean AGO@UI=20 "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis"     -----Original Message----- From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> To: dcase@puc.edu, pipechat@pipechat.org Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 23:00:14 +0800 Subject: Re: J. S. Bach Edition   > No I didn't know Del. Prove it! > Bob Elms. >=20 > >(As you probably know, Bach was not the composer of these works.) > >Del W. Case > >Pacific Union College > >Angwin, CA > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related=20 > >topics > >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > > > >=20 > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >=20     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org      
(back) Subject: Re: Gregorian Chant accompaniments From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 08:00:01 -0800   That wasn't the question.   Old St. Mary's in Cincinnati, where I served in the 1970s, had 3 1/2 - 4 seconds reverb when the church was FULL. There was a professional schola of men in the chancel, and a professional mixed choir in the gallery. The chant required no accompaniment; we routinely silenced the organ completely during Advent and Lent, leaving the gallery choir to sing a cappella as well.   That was an exceptional situation.   It is counter-productive to insist upon unaccompanied chant in all situations, just as it is counter-productive to insist that the singers sing from Gregorian notation in all situations.   SOLESMES issued a modern-notation edition of the Liber Usualis, and pointed out in the preface that it had made it possible for the Chant to penetrate to quarters where it never would have been sung otherwise.   Likewise, SOLESMES has issued new editions of ORGAN ACCOMPANIMENT BOOKS for the Graduale and at least some of the new Office books. As I am currently transcribing the Graduale into English in modern notation for the use of the Anglican Church, those books aren't of any direct, practical use to me.   Yes, the Chant is sufficient as it stands ... pure melody ... but try telling that to a volunteer choir of twelve that has to sing it in an acoustically dead room Sunday by Sunday.   That's why I also look askance at the complex rhythmic theories of "New Solesmes" ... ritards and accelerandos may well be found in the notation of some Carolingian manuscripts, but I can't for the LIFE of me figure out how one would teach the AVERAGE church choir to observe them, without spending ALL of one's rehearsal time on the Chant, to the exclusion of all else. OLD Solesmnes, on the other hand, allows any competent singer to pick up a modern-notation chant book and SIGHT-READ, with a minimum of explanation beyond what to do with the episemas.   Old Solesmes may not be authentic, but it works in practice.   The QUESTION was: is it legitimate to introduce parallel fifths and octaves into Gregorian Chant accompaniment in an other wise Common Practice style?   Cheers,   Bud MusicMan wrote: > And then, there are many, the first to mind is my neighbouring parish, = who > would attest that Gregorian Chant requires 'NO' accompaniment - of any > sort - even in parallels. > > I suppose it's a bit like Bacon & Eggs, Fish and Chips, Gin & Tonic - it = is > sufficient like it is. > <Don't Mess> > > or like that marvellous ditty to the Mitsubishi advert, > "You don't tug on Superman's cape, > You don't spit into the wind; > You don't pull the mask off the ol' Lone Ranger, > An' you don't mess-around with him!" > > Ahh...... 'The Ol' Lone Ranger' ..... now THAT brings back memories > .......... > > Harry [musicman] Grove > > -----Original Message----- > From: Alicia Zeilenga <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> > To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Date: 05 January 2004 04:50 > Subject: Re: Gregorian Chant accompaniments (X-posted) > > > >>Gregorian chant was often harmonized with parallels. < > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >      
(back) Subject: Re: J. S. Bach Edition (Dupre Editions) From: <OrgelspielerKMD@aol.com> Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 11:10:43 EST   Dear List,   This particular posting has created a lot of reply postings. So I will address them all in order by topic. First I would like to say that the = Dupre Editions are superb for fingerings/pedalings. They allow for a complete = legato, which means that everything is prepared for. HOWEVER, one must NEVER play = Bach legato, so do NOT think that I endorse this. After the fingering/pedalings/notes are learned very well, then one must put the = proper articulation into practice. I must say that one should NEVER play from a Dupre edition, as = many things were changed from the original manuscripts and were not made note = of. Therefore, one should only use them for the ingenious fingering/pedaling. = There was a whole thing on heels and toes in Bach on this list and pipeorg-l = before (as the Dupre pedalings indicate the use of heels), and that score was settled. The fact is we have no idea how Bach pedaled, though I am fully = aware that it is completely comfortable to use heels on the pedal boards of Bach's = time. There are some specific places where it would not feel comfortable, = however. I will not go into great detail, though. We even have fingerings that = Bach wrote himself for a piece for manuals only (probably clavichord) for his = son C. P. E. Bach. These employed crossings of fingers, BTW. Concerning who composed them, well we simply do not know, as it has been mentioned. = Though, my personal feelings are that they [The Eight Little Preludes and Fugues] = were written by an Italian composer of some sort.   Sincerely, Christopher J. Howerter, SPC Director of Music St. Paul's Lutheran Church Bethlehem, PA Cell: (610) 462-8017       In a message dated 1/5/04 12:56:46 AM Eastern Standard Time, pipechat@pipechat.org writes: Subject: J. S. Bach Edition From: "r" <basset3@hvc.rr.com> Date: Sun, 4 Jan 2004 16:07:06 -0500   Is there a Dupre edition of the Bach LIttle Preludes and Fugues? If so, who carries them? Thanks, Robert Clooney basset3@hvc.rr.com    
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #4197 - 01/05/04 From: <hydrant@baskerbeagles.com> Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 11:25:54 -0500   >Subject: Re: J. S. Bach Edition >From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> >Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 00:55:44 EST   >Until someone comes up with a difinitive name of the composer, and can prove it beyond a shadow of a doubt, I'd still give old JSB the benefit of the doubt.>   I read recently (don't remember where, of course) that a "recent study" determined the 8 Widdle to be the work of JS Bach for his son CPE Bach. Shows a caring daddy taking time out from the "big stuff" to do something for the kids. The study also indicated that the 8 were written during Bach's mature period when he was really turning out elegant P&Fs.   Wish I could remember by whom the study was done... but what the heck, I'M OLD (and nobody listens to me anyway!! ;-) ).   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D   >Subject: Re: Gregorian Chant accompaniments (X-posted) >From: "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk>   >I suppose it's a bit like Bacon & Eggs, Fish and Chips, Gin & Tonic - it is sufficient like it is.   But Henry.... all of your examples are in TWO parts!! ;-) heeheehee   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Scritchies and Haruffaroo-bahawow...   Bruce and the Baskerbeagles http://baskerbeagles.com a great way to shop http://www.smartmall.biz?717886 HELP FEED ANIMALS FOR FREE http://tinyurl.com/2j5i and = http://pets.care2.com  
(back) Subject: taking the time to learn how your OWN fingers work From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 11:39:24 EST   In a message dated 1/5/2004 10:11:25 AM Central Standard Time, OrgelspielerKMD@aol.com writes: HOWEVER, one must NEVER play Bach legato, so do NOT think that I endorse this. After the fingering/pedalings/notes are learned very well, then one = must put the proper articulation into practice. I must say that one should = NEVER play from a Dupre edition, as many things were changed from the original manuscripts and were not made note of. Therefore, one should only use = them for the ingenious fingering/pedaling. There was a whole thing on heels and toes = in Bach on this list and pipeorg-l before (as the Dupre pedalings indicate the use = of heels), and that score was settled. What's the point then? To waste time learning a 4 voice fugue with legato =   fingerings is silly-if you just "pick up your hand and go!" as my first = teacher said, the immediate result will be a clean articulation. Do you propose = that people copy the fingerings and put them in new editions? In doing this, = one never learns what is "right" for one's own hands, and wastes practice time =   being a copyist rather than an innovator. Those fingerings make = challenging music even more challenging, and for NO good reason-its not 1920 anymore. Sorry Chris-couldn't resist :) gfc     Gregory Ceurvorst M.M. Organ Performance Student Northwestern University Director of Music and Organist St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL 847.332.2788 home 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com    
(back) Subject: The Eight Little From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 09:34:27 -0800       OrgelspielerKMD@aol.com wrote: > Dear List, > > (big ol' snip)   Though, my personal feelings are > that they [The Eight Little Preludes and Fugues] were written by an > Italian composer of some sort. > > Sincerely, > Christopher J. Howerter, SPC > Director of Music > St. Paul's Lutheran Church > Bethlehem, PA > Cell: (610) 462-8017 > > >   I think most scholars now believe that Krebs wrote them.   I would question that an Italian composer wrote them, unless he had emigrated to Protestant North Germany ... not too likely in those times of almost constant religious strife.   And Catholic South Germany's pedal organs weren't a WHOLE lot better than the Italians (grin), until a generation later.   Italian pedal-boards WELL into the 19th century consisted of a few large Bourdon pipes for pedal-points in the "good" keys of unequal temperament, which were activated by pedals that were in some cases no more than wooden "mushroom" buttons, similar to Iberian organs of the = time.   Indeed the Serassi family continued that conservative tradition of Italian organ-building ... no reeds, single rank breaking upper octaves and mutations on individual sliders, limited pedal ... right into the 20th century, if I'm not mistaken. I think the last Serassi died around 1930.   So there would have been no point in composing pieces that couldn't be PLAYED on Italian organs.   Cheers,   Bud