PipeChat Digest #4199 - Monday, January 5, 2004
 
does any of this sound familiar?
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: The Eight Little
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: does any of this sound familiar?
  by "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org>
Re: taking the time to learn how your OWN fingers work
  by <OrgelspielerKMD@aol.com>
Incurable Romantics
  by "Charlie Lester" <crlester@137.com>
RE: J. S. Bach Edition
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
Re: The Eight Little
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Re: The Eight Little
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
Mitsubishi advert [off-topic]
  by "Charlie Lester" <crlester@137.com>
Re: Gregorian Chant accompaniments
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: The Eight Little
  by "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org>
RE: hymn tune "New Jerusalem"
  by "Cole" <rcolev@woh.rr.com>
Re: The Eight Little
  by "Shelley Culver" <culverse@westminster.edu>
Re: Is the Church and the organ in a bad way?
  by "Cole" <rcolev@woh.rr.com>
Re: hymn tune "New Jerusalem"
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
RE: Incurable Romantics
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
RE: The Eight Little
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
 

(back) Subject: does any of this sound familiar? From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 09:37:08 -0800   The letter below will serve as a good warning of the hazards of becoming a musician:   Dear Band Leader:   We look forward to your performance at our daughter's wedding. If you don't mind, we would like to request a few of our favorite songs. Please play these during the reception:   A Keith Jarrett composition from his solo series. Please arrange it for full ensemble in the key of B but nothing in 4/4 please.   Mahavishnu Orchestra, "Dance of the Maya" and please have the guitarist play John McLaughlin's solo from the live performance Nov. 16, 1972 at Chrysler Arena. My wife and I were at that show and we liked his use of polyrhythms.   One of John Coltrane's duets with Pharaoh Sanders. Our guests love high register tenor saxes.   We thought a little Stravinsky right after the toast would be nice. So please play "The Rite of Spring." We like a tempo of about 1/4 note =3D 93 and transpose it down 3 half-steps - it will be so much more appropriate for this occasion in the slightly lower register.   Then for the candle lighting ceremony, please play Frank Zappa's "The Grand Wazoo." The original key of B flat, would be fine but my cousin Jeannie would like to sing the baritone sax solo in the key of D - she has kind of a high voice.   When my new son-in-law takes off the garter, please just a little of Varese's "Ionization." It's such a funny piece, we think it would go over real well. Much better than "The Stripper."   And for the bride & groom's first dance, please slow things down a bit by doing Barber's "Adagio For Strings." It's so much better than "We've Only Just Begun" or the "Anniversary Waltz."   When my wife and I join in the first dance, could you segue to Thelonius Monk's "Ruby, My Dear" - it's in honor of my wife's grandmother whose name was Ruby. It would mean so much to the family.   Thanks for all your help. Depending on the outcome we'll certainly be happy to recommend your band to our friends.   We'll have your check for the fee of $250 (minus our expenses in = contacting you of $12.50) by the end of next month: we're a little short as the young lady doing the balloon arch wanted her $1,850 in advance and the DJ had to be paid up front his $2,500 as normal. Our daughter assured us that = your love of music was greater than your need for money, and that you would welcome the exposure you would get from playing this wedding.   Before you leave, please feel free to ask the caterer for a snack sandwich and a soda (the bottles are returnable or you can pay the deposit to the butler). Please use the back entrance to avoid disturbing the guests."        
(back) Subject: Re: The Eight Little From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 12:33:18 -0500   on 1/5/04 12:34 PM, quilisma@cox.net at quilisma@cox.net wrote:     > > I think most scholars now believe that Krebs wrote them. > >   I've been playing a lot of Krebs recently--all his chorale preludes, = trios, preludes, fugues--and while he is quite good, he isn't _that_ good. The 8 are not in his style (or styles, as he flits from Bach-ish baroque to galant). Krebs never wrote anything as profound as the E Minor Little Prelude.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: does any of this sound familiar? From: "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 11:32:49 -0600   I hope they obliged by providing John Cage's study on ambient room sound.   jch     At 11:37 AM 1/5/04, you wrote:   >The letter below will serve as a good warning of the hazards of becoming = a >musician: > >Dear Band Leader: > >We look forward to your performance at our daughter's wedding. If you >don't mind, we would like to request a few of our favorite songs. Please = play >these during the reception: > >A Keith Jarrett composition from his solo series. Please arrange it for >full ensemble in the key of B but nothing in 4/4 please. > >Mahavishnu Orchestra, "Dance of the Maya" and please have the guitarist >play John McLaughlin's solo from the live performance Nov. 16, 1972 at >Chrysler Arena. My wife and I were at that show and we liked his use of >polyrhythms. > >One of John Coltrane's duets with Pharaoh Sanders. Our guests love high >register tenor saxes. > >We thought a little Stravinsky right after the toast would be nice. So >please play "The Rite of Spring." We like a tempo of about 1/4 note =3D = 93 >and transpose it down 3 half-steps - it will be so much more appropriate >for this occasion in the slightly lower register. > >Then for the candle lighting ceremony, please play Frank Zappa's "The >Grand Wazoo." The original key of B flat, would be fine but my cousin = Jeannie >would like to sing the baritone sax solo in the key of D - she has kind >of a high voice. > >When my new son-in-law takes off the garter, please just a little of >Varese's "Ionization." It's such a funny piece, we think it would go >over real well. Much better than "The Stripper." > >And for the bride & groom's first dance, please slow things down a bit >by doing Barber's "Adagio For Strings." It's so much better than "We've >Only Just Begun" or the "Anniversary Waltz." > >When my wife and I join in the first dance, could you segue to Thelonius >Monk's "Ruby, My Dear" - it's in honor of my wife's grandmother whose >name was Ruby. It would mean so much to the family. > >Thanks for all your help. Depending on the outcome we'll certainly be >happy to recommend your band to our friends. > >We'll have your check for the fee of $250 (minus our expenses in = contacting >you of $12.50) by the end of next month: we're a little short as the = young >lady doing the balloon arch wanted her $1,850 in advance and the DJ had >to be paid up front his $2,500 as normal. Our daughter assured us that = your >love of music was greater than your need for money, and that you would >welcome the exposure you would get from playing this wedding. > >Before you leave, please feel free to ask the caterer for a snack = sandwich >and a soda (the bottles are returnable or you can pay the deposit to the >butler). Please use the back entrance to avoid disturbing the guests." > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: taking the time to learn how your OWN fingers work From: <OrgelspielerKMD@aol.com> Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 12:57:23 EST   Dear List,   My dear friend Greg has some good points. I wish I would have been a bit more clear. Indeed everyone's fingers are different. Therefore, all = people should use their own judgment when it comes to fingering. Though, Dupre = has some wonderful fingerings for those of us who have hands that are big enough to =   comfortably reach a tenth. Which, both my and my teacher's hands fit that =   description, which is quite convenient. So, Dupre's fingerings are bias = in that sense. His fingerings are a great starting point for those who's hands = are not that big. If something does not feel right or is very uncomfortable, then = one should change it to suit their own hands, and try to make this fingering employ a good legato as well. So why bother, as it has been mentioned. = Well, by doing this, one will then automatically reject any fingering that doesn't employ the legato and preparation for other works not found in a Dupre = Edition. Therefore, it is a wonderful starting point to learning a very sensible = way of fingering. My advice is don't waste money buying the edition, if you can = find it in a library or borrow it from someone. I am currently learning the Prelude and Fugue in C Minor BWV 537. The fingerings in the Dupre Edition = are so very helpful and work wonders. I will also note that Dupre did not use = the Bach Neue Ausgabe. He used the GSA, I believe it's called. I am not sure on = the latter, it could be called something totally different, though it was more =   popular years and years ago. I personally believe that the "GSA" is more = musical than that of the Bach Neue Ausgabe, even though the latter is more widely accepted. I use the Baerenreiter, which employs the Bach Neue Ausgabe = because using the other in competitions would probably not go over well with the = judges. I brought that up because in one section of the fugue there was a discrepancy between the Dupre and the Baerenreiter Editions. I am = referring to measure 64 in the Baerenreiter Edition. BTW, whenever I refereed to Baerenreiter Edition, I was referring to the Urtext Edition.   Sincerely, Christopher J. Howerter, SPC Director of Music St. Paul's Lutheran Church Bethlehem, PA Cell: (610) 462-8017     In a message dated 1/5/04 12:30:44 PM Eastern Standard Time, pipechat@pipechat.org writes: Subject: taking the time to learn how your OWN fingers work From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 11:39:24 EST   In a message dated 1/5/2004 10:11:25 AM Central Standard Time, OrgelspielerKMD@aol.com writes: HOWEVER, one must NEVER play Bach legato, so do NOT think that I endorse this. After the fingering/pedalings/notes are learned very well, then one =   must put the proper articulation into practice. I must say that one should = NEVER play from a Dupre edition, as many things were changed from the original manuscripts and were not made note of. Therefore, one should only use = them for the ingenious fingering/pedaling. There was a whole thing on heels and toes = in Bach on this list and pipeorg-l before (as the Dupre pedalings indicate the use = of heels), and that score was settled. ---------------- greg wrote:   What's the point then? To waste time learning a 4 voice fugue with legato =   fingerings is silly-if you just "pick up your hand and go!" as my first teacher said, the immediate result will be a clean articulation. Do you propose = that people copy the fingerings and put them in new editions? In doing this, = one never learns what is "right" for one's own hands, and wastes practice time =   being a copyist rather than an innovator. Those fingerings make = challenging music even more challenging, and for NO good reason-its not 1920 anymore. Sorry Chris-couldn't resist :) gfc     Gregory Ceurvorst M.M. Organ Performance Student Northwestern University Director of Music and Organist St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL 847.332.2788 home 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com    
(back) Subject: Incurable Romantics From: "Charlie Lester" <crlester@137.com> Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 10:09:30 -0800   Colin Mitchell said,   =3D-> It's the same process as the old organist playing Bach who, on reaching a mind boggling crescendo on a four manual Harrison & Harrison built in 1927, had the gall to announce, "If only Bach could have had an organ like this to play!" <-=3D   Indeed.   Particularly since the instruments that he -did- have to play were -tonally- more related to the H&H than they were to most of the counterfeited, pseudo-Baroque squawk-boxes made during the full heat of the "Baroque Revival."   As for the actions, granted, that's a different matter. But there are those who maintain that Bach -- a controversial and innovative musician in his day, rather than being cursed with the Luddite mentality -- would surely have appreciated the luxury and convenience of modern electric action.   Somehow, all things considered, one rather doubts that he spent a lot of time squatting pensively on the organ bench drawing stops and listening for the different amounts of chiff depending on how fast he pressed down on the keys.       =3D-> I thank God that Jesus and Bach weren't incurable romantics!! <-=3D   Who's to say they are not?!     ~ C    
(back) Subject: RE: J. S. Bach Edition From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 14:55:05 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   It's in vol 5.- Dupre's Edition is (or was?) edited by: S. Bornemann = Paris; United Music Publishers LTD London; The W. Gray Company NY. No idea if out of print in these days; Dupre's ideas about Bach playing are not "in" anymore.   Andres Wading thru 200+ mails with most interesting topics after four most hectic days :)- Some comments soon. =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.     ----- Original Message ----- From: r To: PipeChat Sent: Sunday, January 04, 2004 5:07 PM Subject: J. S. Bach Edition     Is there a Dupre edition of the Bach LIttle Preludes and Fugues? If so, who carries them? Thanks, Robert Clooney basset3@hvc.rr.com        
(back) Subject: Re: The Eight Little From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 12:12:58 -0600   I was thinking that too. You have to have a pretty decent pedal division to play them. Alicia Zeilenga Sub-Dean AGO@UI "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis"     -----Original Message----- From: quilisma@cox.net     > I think most scholars now believe that Krebs wrote them. > > I would question that an Italian composer wrote them, unless he had > emigrated to Protestant North Germany ... not too likely in those times > of almost constant religious strife. > > And Catholic South Germany's pedal organs weren't a WHOLE lot better > than the Italians (grin), until a generation later. > > Italian pedal-boards WELL into the 19th century consisted of a few > large > Bourdon pipes for pedal-points in the "good" keys of unequal > temperament, which were activated by pedals that were in some cases no > more than wooden "mushroom" buttons, similar to Iberian organs of the > time.     > So there would have been no point in composing pieces that couldn't be > PLAYED on Italian organs. > > Cheers, > > Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: The Eight Little From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 13:16:40 EST   Whether Bach wrote them is still debatable...   For me, there is no question that they are delightful pieces.   Neil Brown    
(back) Subject: Mitsubishi advert [off-topic] From: "Charlie Lester" <crlester@137.com> Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 10:20:44 -0800   "MusicMan" said,   =3D-> or like that marvellous ditty to the Mitsubishi advert, > "You don't tug on Superman's cape, > You don't spit into the wind; > You don't pull the mask off the ol' Lone Ranger, > An' you don't mess-around with him!" <-=3D     Which of course is just another example of the way that commercial advertising sucks the life out of a good song (classical, rock, jazz or otherwise) and uses it to peddle merchandise to the masses. Surely Jim Croce is spinning in his grave - along with legions of other musical greats whos gems were purloined by Madison Avenue.   ~ C    
(back) Subject: Re: Gregorian Chant accompaniments From: "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 19:00:29 +0000 (GMT)   In the earliest years of the church, singing was unaccompanied and in unison. It had its origins in the Jewish liturgy. It developed during the 11th and 12th century with what is usually called"organum", which was a natural evolution, involving firstly singing in octaves, usually the boys from the monasteries, and then the addition of 5ths and 4ths as those with "tenor" voices found this more natural. The word "organum" comes the Greek for "instrument", and the accompaniment of chant by portative and positive organs is suggested. When I first got an organ in my home my Greek friends all asked me what sort of instrument it was. Warning ! As part of my graduate studies at the Royal College of Music I was required to write an essay on the history of church music. Professor Wilkinson commented that whilst entertaining reading, it was full of factual errors! John Foss     =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D www.johnfoss.gr http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/ Topics of the week : Opera Censorship and the right to silence   ________________________________________________________________________ Yahoo! Messenger - Communicate instantly..."Ping" your friends today! Download Messenger Now http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/download/index.html  
(back) Subject: Re: The Eight Little From: "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org> Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 14:00:16 -0500   > Whether Bach wrote them is still debatable... >=20 > For me, there is no question that they are delightful pieces.   I thought that Christof Wolff had written a paper fairly recently in = which he determined that they were written by Bach. =20   I have the Durpr=E9 edition (vol. V) and find the fingering = suggestions useful when I get stuck. Of course, everyone's hands = are different, so I don't follow Dupr=E9's suggestions slavishly, nor = would I suggest that anyone should, nor should anyone else's = suggested fingerings/pedallings be slavishly followed for that matter. = As pointed out, Dupr=E9's editions are still available. I've seen them = at the Boston Music Company, among others. But new, they are = frightfully expensive. I found mine on eBay for much cheaper. <G!> =20   As Andr=E9 pointed out, though, Dupr=E9 seems to have fallen out of = favor, at least in some circles, but I have still found his editions = useful. =20   Cheers, TommyLee=20 =00  
(back) Subject: RE: hymn tune "New Jerusalem" From: "Cole" <rcolev@woh.rr.com> Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 14:16:54 -0500   Hello, Will Light, I'm a newbie but I checked this tune out on the Cyber Hymnal site. I, too, =   thought the reference was to "Jerusalem" of Monty Python fame. But there = is a "New Jersalem" tune with a lot of the apocalyptic imagery from the Book of the Revelation of St. John the Divine. The usual words to "Jerusalem" (spoofed many time on Monty Python's Flying Circus) are, I think, by Blake =   and refer to some fable of Arthurian imagery favored by the English. I may =   be way off base here as the words seem to me to be rather preposterous. = (I don't want to offend anyone--especially any of my cousins in the UK.) Oh, btw, the tune "Jerusalem" is in the Hymnal 1982 (Episcopal-USA) but with a =   different set of words. I'm not sure about 1940 (Episcopal-USA).   Greetings, Gary (Black???), Am I correct in thinking that your reference to "New Jerusalem" is the = hymn and hymntune by Adrian Vermeulen-Miller? Please see this site: http://www.cyberhymnal.org/htm/n/e/newjerus.htm to check it out.   Thanks to all for the pleasure of being in this group and allowing me to pipe up. (I am profoundly sorry for that, but I just couldn't resist.) Ross Coulson "Cole" Votaw in Springfield, Ohio, USA   >It is just called "Jerusalem" ....Will Light >Coventry UK >----------------------------------------------------------- >In the movie was a hymn entitled, New Jerusalem? >Thanks, Gary      
(back) Subject: Re: The Eight Little From: "Shelley Culver" <culverse@westminster.edu> Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 14:30:58 -0500   >>> quilisma@cox.net 01/05/04 12:34 PM >>>   >I think most scholars now believe that Krebs wrote them.   Actually, Christoph Wolff has done extensive research and has published this research quite recently. His findings are that Bach did write The Eight Little, and the evidence is really quite strong. Bach probably wrote them to teach his son how to play.   Shelley  
(back) Subject: Re: Is the Church and the organ in a bad way? From: "Cole" <rcolev@woh.rr.com> Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 14:28:03 -0500   Please, Colin Mitchell, don't stop. I laughed myself into a coughing fit. Ross Coulson "Cole" Votaw -- Springfield, Ohio, USA   >I shall not say another word after this.....I promise. > ><snip> >I thank God that Jesus and Bach weren't incurable >romantics!! > >Regards, > >Colin Mitchell UK      
(back) Subject: Re: hymn tune "New Jerusalem" From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 11:43:16 -0800   What's not generally understood about Blake's text is that it uses a literary convention of the English metaphysical poets, as well as Latin poets: the CONCEIT, in which the reader is EXPECTED to answer in the negative. Readers of Virgil, etc. would have been familiar with the convention.   Q - And did those feet in ancient times Walk upon England's mountains = green? A - Nope. Never happened.   Q- And was the holy Lamb of God On England's pleasant pastures seen? A- Nope. Not in THIS reality.   Etc.   There have been various interpretations of the poem over the years ... for a long time it was thought that the lines   And was Jerusalm builded her Among those dark satanic mills?   were a protest against sweat-shops, child labour, etc.   The punch-line comes in the second verse:   I will not cease from mental fight, Nor shall my sword sleep in my hand, Till we have built Jerusalem In England's green and pleasant land.   Which would seem to give a larger interpretation than the one above.   Cheers,   Bud           Another good example is the language of the Five Mystical Songs, texts by George Herbert.   Cole wrote:   > Hello, Will Light, > I'm a newbie but I checked this tune out on the Cyber Hymnal site. I, > too, thought the reference was to "Jerusalem" of Monty Python fame. But > there is a "New Jersalem" tune with a lot of the apocalyptic imagery > from the Book of the Revelation of St. John the Divine. The usual words > to "Jerusalem" (spoofed many time on Monty Python's Flying Circus) are, > I think, by Blake and refer to some fable of Arthurian imagery favored > by the English. I may be way off base here as the words seem to me to be =   > rather preposterous. (I don't want to offend anyone--especially any of > my cousins in the UK.) Oh, btw, the tune "Jerusalem" is in the Hymnal > 1982 (Episcopal-USA) but with a different set of words. I'm not sure > about 1940 (Episcopal-USA). > > Greetings, Gary (Black???), > Am I correct in thinking that your reference to "New Jerusalem" is the > hymn and hymntune by Adrian Vermeulen-Miller? Please see this site: > http://www.cyberhymnal.org/htm/n/e/newjerus.htm to check it out. > > Thanks to all for the pleasure of being in this group and allowing me to =   > pipe up. (I am profoundly sorry for that, but I just couldn't resist.) > Ross Coulson "Cole" Votaw in Springfield, Ohio, USA > >> It is just called "Jerusalem" ....Will Light >> Coventry UK >> ----------------------------------------------------------- >> In the movie was a hymn entitled, New Jerusalem? >> Thanks, Gary > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >      
(back) Subject: RE: Incurable Romantics From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 17:07:13 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   Vergil Fox said that Bach was a Romantic Composer. Listening to so many of his works and their bold harmonies I only can agree with that statement, even when I honestly cannot agree with Fox' Bach interpretation.   heretically yours and no flames please Andres =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.   (you may skip following) ----- Original Message ----- From: Charlie Lester <crlester@137.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, January 05, 2004 2:09 PM Subject: Incurable Romantics     > Colin Mitchell said, > > =3D-> It's the same process as the old organist playing Bach > who, on reaching a mind boggling crescendo on a four > manual Harrison & Harrison built in 1927, had the gall > to announce, "If only Bach could have had an organ > like this to play!" <-=3D > > Indeed. > > Particularly since the instruments that he -did- have to > play were -tonally- more related to the H&H than they were > to most of the counterfeited, pseudo-Baroque squawk-boxes > made during the full heat of the "Baroque Revival." > > As for the actions, granted, that's a different matter. But > there are those who maintain that Bach -- a controversial > and innovative musician in his day, rather than being cursed > with the Luddite mentality -- would surely have appreciated > the luxury and convenience of modern electric action. > > Somehow, all things considered, one rather doubts that he > spent a lot of time squatting pensively on the organ bench > drawing stops and listening for the different amounts of > chiff depending on how fast he pressed down on the keys. > > > > =3D-> I thank God that Jesus and Bach weren't incurable > romantics!! <-=3D > > Who's to say they are not?! > > > ~ > C > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >      
(back) Subject: RE: The Eight Little From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 17:08:51 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   They weren't composed by Johann Sebastian Bach but by another guy whose = name incidentally was johann sebastian bach; known as "Hanno the ghostwriter". Shakespeare faces exactly the same problem too.   Tongue in cheek (and nothing personal) Andres =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.   (please skip following if you follwed this thread) ----- Original Message ----- From: <quilisma@cox.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, January 05, 2004 1:34 PM Subject: The Eight Little     > > > OrgelspielerKMD@aol.com wrote: > > Dear List, > > > > > (big ol' snip) > > Though, my personal feelings are > > that they [The Eight Little Preludes and Fugues] were written by an > > Italian composer of some sort. > > > > Sincerely, > > Christopher J. Howerter, SPC > > Director of Music > > St. Paul's Lutheran Church > > Bethlehem, PA > > Cell: (610) 462-8017 > > > > > > > > I think most scholars now believe that Krebs wrote them. > > I would question that an Italian composer wrote them, unless he had > emigrated to Protestant North Germany ... not too likely in those times > of almost constant religious strife. > > And Catholic South Germany's pedal organs weren't a WHOLE lot better > than the Italians (grin), until a generation later. > > Italian pedal-boards WELL into the 19th century consisted of a few large > Bourdon pipes for pedal-points in the "good" keys of unequal > temperament, which were activated by pedals that were in some cases no > more than wooden "mushroom" buttons, similar to Iberian organs of the time. > > Indeed the Serassi family continued that conservative tradition of > Italian organ-building ... no reeds, single rank breaking upper octaves > and mutations on individual sliders, limited pedal ... right into the > 20th century, if I'm not mistaken. I think the last Serassi died around > 1930. > > So there would have been no point in composing pieces that couldn't be > PLAYED on Italian organs. > > Cheers, > > Bud